Falange – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 10:02:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png Falange – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ 32 32 Guillermo del Toro’s Best Performances in Movies, Ranked https://faaeeantrapologia.com/guillermo-del-toros-best-performances-in-movies-ranked/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 16:30:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/guillermo-del-toros-best-performances-in-movies-ranked/ Guillermo del Toro has certainly become a recognizable name in the horror, sci-fi, and fantasy genres, especially in terms of the more enveloping environments that mesmerize audiences. He always seems to add new masterpieces to his repertoire, and even his abandoned projects pique the continued interest of viewers. Its track record of entertainment excellence seems […]]]>

Guillermo del Toro has certainly become a recognizable name in the horror, sci-fi, and fantasy genres, especially in terms of the more enveloping environments that mesmerize audiences. He always seems to add new masterpieces to his repertoire, and even his abandoned projects pique the continued interest of viewers. Its track record of entertainment excellence seems to speak for itself, developing a memorable world-building and sense of uniqueness.


Besides incredible practical effects and his penchant for creatures in his works, his films are often marked by jaw-dropping acting performances. These portrayals include a wide range of ages and genders, emphasizing the stellar talent found all over Hollywood and beyond. Check out the best performances from Guillermo del Toro’s films, ranked.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

6/6 Ron Perlmann – Hellboy (2004)

Ron Perlman in Hellboy
Pictures of Colombia

Expose the audience to a memorable moment creature characteristic protagonist, the first Hellboy the film gave way to a famous franchise. Ron PerlmanThe depiction of the eponymous character adds a strong physicality to the already muscular Hellboy, given his inherent purpose. Hellboy’s mission represents an evil advantage for the allied forces against the Nazis, whom he was originally supposed to aid when he was called to our world. Perlman’s performance is recognizable and ultimately quintessential, reminding viewers that history thanks him for “bringing[ing] Hellboy comes to life on the big screen”, as Cinemablend quotes.

5/6 Mia Wasikowska – Crimson Peak (2015)

Mia Wasikowska in Crimson Peak.
Universal images

Crimson Peak is an incredible example of classic gothic horror imagined through a contemporary cinematic lens, welcoming audiences into an immersive chilling story with even deeper and darker secrets within. The film expands on the newly married Edith’s exploration of her impending new residence, an old mansion. Like Edith, Mia Wasikowska depicts a young woman welcomed into the darkness of the home as she comes face to face with her haunting story, as well as her own. His breathtaking performance centralizes the horror found in this film, as Edith bears witness to the shocking events surrounding her.

Related: Why Crimson Peak Is One Of Guillermo Del Toro’s Most Underrated Movies

4/6 Ivana Baquero – Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)

Ivana Baquero in Pan's Labyrinth.
Photo house

Ivana BaqueroOfelia’s performance immerses the audience in a frightening and fantastical world through the perspective of a young person, who is also surrounded by the traumas of her very real world. As Pan’s Labyrinth‘s main character, her perspective introduces the audience to the Falange vision of Spain in 1944. This is seen through the eyes of a girl who dreams of happier fantasy stories, which soon become as real as her dark present day. when she encounters the Faun Pan, credited as Fauno. As a Spanish and Mexican production, the film is set in Spanish, showcasing del Toro’s roots in Mexico. Baquero’s performance capitalizes on her wide-eyed imagination, as Ofelia sees more shocking and intriguing events day after day.

3/6 Megan Charpentier and Isabelle Nélisse – Mom (2013)

Isabelle Nélisse and Megan Charpentier in Mama.
Universal images

Although this movie was directed by Andy Muschietti, it was presented and produced by Guillermo del Toro, so it still matters. In a duet of stunning performances by two young actresses, Mom Features Megane Charpentier and Isabelle Nelisse as sisters Victoria and Lilly. Cast aside by their father during an evening of horrific tragedy, the two are watched closely by a mysterious motherly force (known as the titular Mama) as they are lifted out of misery and poverty. neglect in their new life. Charpentier and Nélisse portray the sisters’ utterly raw survival instincts in their more fitted appearances. During the time of Momis filming – according to an interview from We Got This Covered with Jessica Chastain – Nélisse did not speak English, as her first language was French. She began to learn on set, explaining her largely quiet yet impactful performance alongside Charpentier.

Related: The Most Terrifying Horror Movie Moms, Ranked

2/6 Bradley Cooper – Nightmare Alley (2021)

Bradley Cooper and Cate Blanchett in Nightmare Alley.
Searchlight Pictures via Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Revitalizing the classic 1947 film, del Toro’s alley of nightmares contains an atmosphere of cast and optics that saves some disappointments that some audience members have noted. He is remembered as one of the most amazing horror coins of 2021. bradley cooperIt’s Stanton Carlisle’s turn to lead the audience into the spooky carnival that seems to consume the lives of everyone involved. Stan finds employment there with the undercurrent of exploitation, ending up falling victim to it himself by the end of the story. Filled with performances from established stars, Cooper stands out most distinctly at the end of the film, and his final scenes depict the depravity he is trapped in, as he laughs and cries helplessly.

1/6 Sally Hawkins – The Shape of Water (2017)

Sally Hawkins in The Shape of Water.
twentieth century fox

It’s no secret that The shape of water has received well-deserved attention from the Academy since its release. It earned 13 nominations, “including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Leading Actress for Sally Hawkin“, according to the Independentgoes to win four Oscars. Revolving around the bond between a mute woman and a strange amphibian discovery, it captures lessons of acceptance and ultimate understanding. Sally Hawkins’ portrayal of Elisa Esposito is powerful, expressing her character’s deepest desires through her performance. Through her closeness to Trump, she educates him on how the two can exchange information through sign language. She shows how verbal communication is not the only way to create strong bonds between two parties.

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Spanish government targets Franco-era figures buried in Toledo for upcoming exhumations https://faaeeantrapologia.com/spanish-government-targets-franco-era-figures-buried-in-toledo-for-upcoming-exhumations/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 11:45:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/spanish-government-targets-franco-era-figures-buried-in-toledo-for-upcoming-exhumations/ Spanish government SOURCES have confirmed to reporters that they are already studying the upcoming exhumations of Franco-era military figures, after three coffins were removed from La Macarena basilica in Seville this week. The exhumations are being carried out under Spain’s recent approval democratic memory law, which was passed by the Socialist Party-led government with the […]]]>

Spanish government SOURCES have confirmed to reporters that they are already studying the upcoming exhumations of Franco-era military figures, after three coffins were removed from La Macarena basilica in Seville this week.

The exhumations are being carried out under Spain’s recent approval democratic memory law, which was passed by the Socialist Party-led government with the aim of healing some of the open wounds that remain from the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and the subsequent dictatorship.

According to reports in Spanish media, the government has set its sights on the Alcazar of Toledo, where it is seeking to move the remains of Jaime Milans del Bosch, who died in 1997 aged 82. Milans was not only part of the blue division of volunteers who fought alongside the Nazis, but also the lieutenant general who ordered tanks to the streets of Valencia during the failed coup attempt of 1981 in Spain.

In addition to Milans, the government wants to exhume Franco-era general José Moscardó, who is also buried in the Alcazar crypt. Moscardó was the military governor of the province of Toledo during the Civil War and defended the Alcazar against Republican forces.

The law of democratic memory allows the cancellation of titles and medals which were granted by the regime of the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco, as well as the annulment of the convictions pronounced by the courts during the dictatorship.

It also clarifies that figures from that era cannot be left buried in public places where they can be praised or glorified. It is this part of the legislation that is used to carry out exhumations.

In the early hours of Thursday morning, the body of General Gonzalo Queipo de Llano was withdrawn from La Macarena in Seville. The remains of his wife, Genoveva Martí, and those of the Auditor General of the Civil War, Francisco Bohórquez Vecina, were also removed from the church.

In 2019, Franco’s body was removed from the Valley of the Fallen monument in Madrid after a vote in favor of exhumation passed in the Congress of Deputies, the lower house of Spain’s parliament.

The family of Jose Antonio Primo de Riverawho was the founder of Spain’s fascist Falange party, announced that he would privately remove his remains from the Valley of the Fallen before the Spanish government did.

The Socialist Party promoted a series of historical memory laws while in power, beginning in 2007 when the legislation was passed by the government of then Prime Minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero. The bill recognized the rights of victims on both sides of the civil war and formally condemned the repression of the Franco regime.

Read more:

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A total (and often captivating) theatrical experience: Ainadamar’s review of Scottish opera https://faaeeantrapologia.com/a-total-and-often-captivating-theatrical-experience-ainadamars-review-of-scottish-opera/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 21:55:13 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/a-total-and-often-captivating-theatrical-experience-ainadamars-review-of-scottish-opera/ Do you remember Osvaldo Golijov? Two decades ago, he was classical music’s next big thing: a believable postmodernist with lush, listenable tonal flair, and an Argentinian with a complex and interesting European heritage in a millennium where everyone agreed – for a while, anyway – that the future was Latin American. . Major labels recorded […]]]>

Do you remember Osvaldo Golijov? Two decades ago, he was classical music’s next big thing: a believable postmodernist with lush, listenable tonal flair, and an Argentinian with a complex and interesting European heritage in a millennium where everyone agreed – for a while, anyway – that the future was Latin American. . Major labels recorded his music from its premiere; he was popular. Too popular for some – I remember a promoter of contemporary music lamenting, with the attitude of a householder who has just found the Head Boy smoking behind the garbage cans, that Golijov “doesn’t was not developed as we hoped”. Anyway, Golijov was great, then something stalled. Orders failed to materialize, there were rumors of creative blockage, and the show continued.

So here we are in 2022, finally seeing the “Scottish premiere and UK premiere” of Golijov’s 2003 opera Ainadamar. Note these qualifications: Ainadamar was captured for a UK premiere around the height of Goli-mania in 2008 (not in a theatre, but by the CBSO in Birmingham) and it hasn’t been seen here since. The impression left by this 2008 concert was that of an essentially static work, a dramatic cantata emphasizing the cantata rather than the dramatic. At least this new production by Deborah Colker for Scottish Opera sets the record straight. The visual dimension adds enormously to the effectiveness of the score. Ainadamar belongs to the theatre.

But Colker goes further – designing an onstage world that makes sense of the dreamlike flashbacks and narrative layers of David Henry Hwang’s libretto, and presenting it with a bravery that matches (some might say saves) the smoky, infused music. of flamenco by Golijov. The story, condensed into a little too long 80 minutes, is the death of Federico Garcia Lorca, told in flashback by actress Margarita Xirgu, star of Lorca’s Marianne Pineda. Designer Jon Bausor has created a circular curtain of hanging wires; a shifting, permeable barrier between fact and fiction, past and present, and using video projections (Tal Rosner) and moody lighting (Paul Keogan), it provides cover for the shifts scene, as well as full-fledged abstract images. Margarita (Lauren Fagan), overwhelmed with grief, runs around the circle, waving the threads with her hand. Blood-red strings slide from above, in an eerie inversion of the opera’s central image – the “fountain of tears” outside Granada where Lorca is believed to have been murdered.

Both tracks (only two really count for much, though Julieth Lozano was sprightly and likeable as Margarita’s student Nuria) took that space and filled it with warm-blooded life. Margarita carries the show effectively, and Fagan – fresh out of playing village pie in The Wreckers to Glyndebourne – infuses a tearful fervor into every gesture and every phrase, scraping a dark, bitter residue of pain from its low notes. She’s terrific, her vocal performance clearly informed by the wild, heartbreaking scream of flamenco singer Alfredo Tejada, playing the Phalangist officer whose menacing broadcasts (projected as news headlines) are the most chilling moments in history. . That folk idioms don’t automatically equate with freedom or authenticity is one of the most gratifying aspects of Golijov’s score.

Against Margarita’s flamboyant conviction, Lorca himself (a pants role, sung by Samantha Hankey) is a cooler, dapper client in a suit and tie. Again, Hwang and Golijov’s decision to present Lorca as an entertainer with an inner voice (as opposed to the politicized theatrics of actress Margarita) is a compelling characterization, and Hankey embodies the poet with grace. easy. His masculine ambulation is matched only by the measured passion of his singing, which gradually narrows into a cry of pain. There’s gripping choreography without too many eye-blinks or castanet-clapping, and though your enjoyment of Golijov’s music (played warmly and tightly paced under the direction of Stuart Stratford) will depend on your personal tolerance level for the flamenco guitars and sultry trumpet solos, this production goes beyond the music: it’s a total (and often captivating) theatrical experience. An opera, in other words. Golijov came on stage to salute. He looked delighted.

In Manchester, Sir Mark Elder conducted Verdi Requiem and it was as great as expected, with the low brass (with cimbasso – imagine a trombone filled with growth hormones, then wrapped around a lamppost) flooding the lower part of the orchestra with the velvety blackness of El Greco while the Hallé Choir floated and shone like a cherub from above (they were incredibly agile in Verdi’s massive choral fugues). Soprano Natalya Romaniw soared through clouds of glory, singing like she was in Don Carlos and quivering with passion on the final ‘Libera me’. Apparently it was his first Verdi Requiem and Elder persuaded her to sing it; in which case we have yet another reason to be grateful to Sir Mark.

The post office A total (and often captivating) theatrical experience: Ainadamar’s review of Scottish opera appeared first on The spectator.

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Retrospective: an infamous anniversary https://faaeeantrapologia.com/retrospective-an-infamous-anniversary/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 13:00:36 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/retrospective-an-infamous-anniversary/ Much of the credit for the fascist accusation in the 20th century belongs to Mussolini. The William Davidson Digital Archive of Detroit Jewish History contains nearly 1,000 pages that mention him. There is a major anniversary this week; however, it is not a celebratory occasion. It is the anniversary of a dark day in European […]]]>

Much of the credit for the fascist accusation in the 20th century belongs to Mussolini. The William Davidson Digital Archive of Detroit Jewish History contains nearly 1,000 pages that mention him.

There is a major anniversary this week; however, it is not a celebratory occasion. It is the anniversary of a dark day in European history. A hundred years ago, on October 28, 1922, the King of Italy Victor Emmanuel III handed over power to Benito Mussolini and asked him to form a government. The king and his colleagues foolishly thought they could control Mussolini.

Mussolini, with the help of his fanatical henchmen, the “Blackshirts”, quickly established a totalitarian state. This was the beginning of modern political fascism in the world. Mussolini became an inspiration to fascist ideologues such as Francisco Franco and his Falangists in Spain, and worst of all, Adolf Hitler and his Nazis in Germany. In fact, in the December 29, 1922 issue of the Detroit Jewish ChronicleHitler was referred to as the “Bavarian Mussolini”.

Recently, we have seen the rise of far-right nationalism in Europe and America. De facto dictatorships reign in Hungary, Belarus, Russia and elsewhere. Last month, far-right parties gained significant power in democratic Italy and Sweden. The United States also has its extremists. Just consider the infamous “Unite the Right” rally held five years ago in Charlottesville, Virginia by neo-fascists, neo-Nazis and other like-minded people.

Historically, fascism has led to the worst forms of anti-Semitism. The Nazis enacted the Holocaust. Participants in the “Unite the Right” rally spewed hatred of Jews. Sadly, this is not an isolated incident in America today.

Much of the credit for the fascist accusation in the 20th century belongs to Mussolini. The William Davidson Digital Archive of Detroit Jewish History contains nearly 1,000 pages that mention him. While very interesting to read, the reports and articles are sobering to say the least.

From 1922, Mussolini became the subject of news and editorials in the the Chronicle. For example, see the direct editorial “Fascismo and Democracy” in the July 18, 1924 issue: “We are as opposed to a Mussolini dictatorship and fascism as we are to Lenin, Trotsky and others in Russia. Mussolini is discussed in many editorials and supplemental articles in the 1920s.

By the 1930s, reports of Mussolini rivaled those of the Nazis, but he had yet to fully acquiesce in Hitler. In some cases, he is even presented as a defender of the Jews.

Once World War II began, Mussolini was mentioned on hundreds of pages from both the the Chronicle and the jn as Axis leader. This was especially the case after he embraced Hitler’s desire to round up Italian Jews for concentration camps (December 10, 1943, jn). In the aftermath of the war, until today, Mussolini remains a serious subject for historians, political scientists and other writers and documentarians.

I decided to write this column after reading about the Brothers of Italy, a right-wing descendant of a fascist party formed after World War II. Last month it emerged from elections as Italy’s largest political party. Its leader, Giorgia Meloni, said “the Italian right has been putting fascism back in history for decades, unequivocally condemning the suppression of democracy and ignominious anti-Jewish laws”.

Let’s hope that’s the case. Too often, however, we have heard similar statements from Mussolini and other fascists, statements that turned out to be vain hopes.

You want to know more ? Access the DJN Foundation archives, available for free at www.djnfoundation.org.

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Beware the rise of authoritarians abroad and at home https://faaeeantrapologia.com/beware-the-rise-of-authoritarians-abroad-and-at-home/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 10:00:01 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/beware-the-rise-of-authoritarians-abroad-and-at-home/ One hundred years ago today, on October 26, 1922, the Italian government resigned under pressure from Benito Mussolini, who was planning an insurrection and a “march on Rome” with his blackshirt army. Prime Minister Luigi Facta begged the petty and irresolute King Victor Emmanuel III to declare a state of siege, but the king refused […]]]>

One hundred years ago today, on October 26, 1922, the Italian government resigned under pressure from Benito Mussolini, who was planning an insurrection and a “march on Rome” with his blackshirt army.

Prime Minister Luigi Facta begged the petty and irresolute King Victor Emmanuel III to declare a state of siege, but the king refused and, in a desperate attempt to avoid armed conflict, appointed Mussolini prime minister.

This was the beginning of the rise of modern fascism in Europe, which quickly spread to the National Socialist German Workers’ Party (Nazi Party) under Hitler and then to the Fatherland Front in Austria under Kurt Von Schuschnigg. Schuschnigg was bullied into accepting Austria’s absorption into the Third Reich following a terrifying encounter with Hitler at Berchtesgaden in February 1938. The spread of fascism also embraced the Iberian Peninsula, with the formation of the Falange Española of General Francisco Franco and the National Union in Portugal under António de Oliveira Salazar. Fascist movements also erupted for a time in Bulgaria, Romania, Yugoslavia and Greece.

Despite the horrors of World War II, the legacy of far-right neo-fascist ideological authoritarianism reverberated through the following decades and is evident in many countries today. The emergence of Giorgia Meloni, president of the Fratelli d’Italia (Brothers of Italy) party, as Italy’s first female prime minister is a centuries-old irony. The Italian Brothers are a far-right populist political party that split from Silvio Berlusconi’s People’s Freedom Party in 2012. Meloni has praised Mussolini in the past, saying: “Mussolini was a good politician, in that everything he did, he did for Italy”. In 2018, she even celebrated Vladimir Putin’s electoral victory as representing “the unequivocal will of the Russian people”. however, changed his mind about Putin after the Russian invasion of Ukraine and called on the EU to continue supplying weapons to Volodymyr Zalensky.

Meloni is Eurosceptic, anti-immigration, anti-abortion, anti-euthanasia and anti-same-sex marriage. She describes herself as a Catholic and conservative Christian and says she represents “God, country and family”. Meloni’s popularity has grown during the pandemic, in his role as leader of the only effective party opposed to Mario Draghi’s government of national unity. In a strategy that should be familiar to British voters, she proposes a sweeping policy of tax cuts and massive increases in Italy’s national debt to fund relief from soaring energy bills.

Meloni’s populist rise to power from the ashes of the pandemic is by no means unique. The coronavirus crisis has provided the ideal platform for nationalist governments to consolidate their authority, rushing through a series of emergency measures, leading inexorably to an erosion of freedom.

The worst example is Hungary, whose autocratic and neo-fascist Prime Minister Viktor Orbán systematically intimidated the Hungarian judiciary, emasculated the free press and manipulated electoral law to the specific advantage of his own ruling party, Fidesz. He was the first to place armed guards at the Hungarian border to prevent an influx of refugees, in direct violation of EU humanitarian conventions. Orbán seized on the coronavirus pandemic as a way to effectively kill democracy. He is also a fan of Vladimir Putin.

Orbán found a willing apprentice in the authoritarian Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon, whose SNP government became increasingly centrist and intolerant, tolerating no criticism or opposition, even from its own members. The Prime Minister’s obsession with holding a second independence referendum, instead of dealing with our failing education system, the crumbling NHS, the sky-high drug-related deaths, the ferry fiasco, the skyrocketing inflation and soaring energy costs, is a sure sign of the narrow-minded xenophobia of its toxic synthesis of nationalism and socialism.

None of these abject failures were mentioned in Ms Sturgeon’s ‘UN candidacy speech’ at the SNP party conference, or even in her economics piece Building a New Scotland published last week. The SNP Government’s command economy approach to wasting public money was best exemplified by its intervention at the struggling Lochaber steel smelter when it guaranteed £586million of taxpayers’ money to the billionaire Sanjeev Gupta. With Gupta’s steel empire now facing serious financial problems, Scottish taxpayers could find themselves facing a bill of more than half a billion pounds.

But economic incompetence is only the tip of a huge nationalist iceberg. Ms Sturgeon betrayed the true and deeply sinister instincts of her government when she tried to introduce a law that would have mandated an appointed person or “state guardian” for every child in the country. This chilling macho principle that “government always knows best” can be seen on a broader level in world leaders like Putin, Xi Jinping, Trump, Erdogan, Bolsonaro, Khamenei and Kim Jong-un. They share the same qualities, values ​​and characters, despite differences in geographical locations and political systems.

Nationalism can encompass both right-wing and left-wing political ideologies. The kind of nationalism that these leaders promote convinces their followers that their nation is superior to other nations. They believe that their culture, values ​​and way of life are worth more than those of other countries and therefore they find themselves and their country more valuable than those of other countries. It’s a dangerous illusion, but it can easily be seen here in Scotland, when crowds of chanting, flag-waving SNP supporters gather in our streets.

George Orwell, in his essay “Notes on Nationalism,” identified three key traits with which SNP supporters will be familiar. First, he listed the “obsession”, writing that a nationalist’s “special mission is to prove that the nation he has chosen is in every way better than its rivals”. Second, Orwell listed “instability”, which he described as “the relentless, reductive, uncompromising fervor” of a nationalist’s mindset. And third, he listed “indifference to reality”, explaining that “every nationalist is capable of the most flagrant dishonesty, but he is also – since he is aware of serving something greater than himself – unshakably sure to be right”.

Benito Mussolini said, “It’s good to trust others, but not to do so is much better.” One hundred years after the dawn of modern fascism in Europe, this motto may soon be engraved on the door of Bute House.

Struan Stevenson was a Conservative Member of the European Parliament representing Scotland (1999-2014).


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Spain cancels 33 titles awarded by dictator Franco to his family and aides https://faaeeantrapologia.com/spain-cancels-33-titles-awarded-by-dictator-franco-to-his-family-and-aides/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 09:14:11 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/spain-cancels-33-titles-awarded-by-dictator-franco-to-his-family-and-aides/ MADRID – Spain on Friday abolished 33 aristocratic titles awarded by dictator Francisco Franco and his successor to loyal lieutenants and family as a new ‘democratic memory’ law came into effect. The measure affects two of Franco’s grandchildren, as well as the descendants of several of his top generals, ministers and other senior officials. Franco […]]]>

MADRID – Spain on Friday abolished 33 aristocratic titles awarded by dictator Francisco Franco and his successor to loyal lieutenants and family as a new ‘democratic memory’ law came into effect.

The measure affects two of Franco’s grandchildren, as well as the descendants of several of his top generals, ministers and other senior officials.

Franco ruled Spain from 1939 to 1975 after leading a military coup against the left-wing elected government of the Popular Front of the Second Republic, which resulted in a three-year civil war that claimed the lives of 500,000 people.

The law, which recently lifted its last parliamentary obstacle in the upper house, equates “the glorification of the perpetrators of crimes against humanity” with the humiliation of the victims of the Franco regime and removes titles that exalt civil war and dictatorship military.

While most of the titles were granted by Franco himself as a reward for their loyalty, five people affected by the law were ennobled by his successor as head of state, the former king Juan Carlos I, in the first months of his reign after the death of Franco.

Francisco Franco Martinez-Bordiu, the eldest grandson of the autocrat who inherited the lordship of Meiras from Franco’s widow, Carmen Polo, described the abolition of the title as “nonsense without any practical effect” in a July interview with the newspaper El Independiente.

“I will continue to be lord of Meiras even if the government does not recognize it,” he said.

His sister, Carmen Martinez-Bordiu, will be stripped of the Duchy of Franco, granted by Juan Carlos I to Franco’s only daughter shortly after the strongman’s death at the end of 1975.

Others affected by the bill include relatives of the founder of the fascist Falange party, Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, and descendants of Generals Gonzalo Queipo de Llano and Juan Yagüe, who ordered massacres of civilians in the towns of Seville and Badajoz, respectively.

Fourteen years after Spain passed its first ‘historical memory’ law, new legislation imposed by the centre-left government aims to close loopholes and cover a wider range of Franco-related victims and crimes .

It also promotes the search and exhumation of victims buried in more than 3,000 documented mass graves. At least 114,000 civilians were victims of enforced disappearances during the war and subsequent crackdown, according to a 2008 court ruling.

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Online launch of a virtual museum on the Spanish Civil War with the aim of filling a gap in collective memory https://faaeeantrapologia.com/online-launch-of-a-virtual-museum-on-the-spanish-civil-war-with-the-aim-of-filling-a-gap-in-collective-memory/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/online-launch-of-a-virtual-museum-on-the-spanish-civil-war-with-the-aim-of-filling-a-gap-in-collective-memory/ TO LITTLE fanfare, the Virtual Museum of the Spanish Civil War launched online in September. The free website aims to educate anyone interested in the conflict, which took place from 1936 to 1939 and is still bitterly divided among many Spaniards today. The website consists of 130 images grouped into five galleries, with the photos […]]]>

TO LITTLE fanfare, the Virtual Museum of the Spanish Civil War launched online in September. The free website aims to educate anyone interested in the conflict, which took place from 1936 to 1939 and is still bitterly divided among many Spaniards today.

The website consists of 130 images grouped into five galleries, with the photos accompanied by simple text that seeks to explain how the conflict unfolded on a military level, the impact it had on the world at large. era and the effect it had on the Spaniards. population.

The project will serve to fill a gap in the Spanish collective memory, given that there are few museums dedicated to history in the country and even fewer when it comes to the Civil War.

The website was created by an international team of scholars from centers of learning as diverse as Trent University in Canada, Warwick University in England and Arkansas State University in the United States. .

One of the pages of the online museum.

The arrival of the museum comes at a time when there have been new developments in terms of historical memory in Spain.

The Socialist Party-led government recently passed the Democratic Memory Law, which aims to heal the still-open wounds of the Civil War and the dictatorship of Francisco Franco.

These include a DNA bank to help locate the bodies of victims who are still buried in mass graves across the country, as well as changes to the Valley of the Fallen, the monument outside Madrid that was until recently Franco’s resting place.

The Spanish government exhumed the remains of the former dictator from the Valley of the Fallen in 2019. The family of José Antonio Primo de Rivera, the founder of Spain’s fascist Falange party, announced last week that they would privately exhume the remains of the politician of the valley. of the fallen monument, before the central government did so under the new Historical Memory Act.

As for the new online museum, the creators said they plan to add content over the next few months, as well as translating the texts – currently available in Spanish and English – into other official languages ​​such as the Basque, Catalan and Galician.

Read more:

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Explainer: What will be the effects of the new Spanish law on democratic memory? https://faaeeantrapologia.com/explainer-what-will-be-the-effects-of-the-new-spanish-law-on-democratic-memory/ Wed, 12 Oct 2022 10:45:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/explainer-what-will-be-the-effects-of-the-new-spanish-law-on-democratic-memory/ EARLIER this month, the Socialist Party-led central government approved a new bill: the Democratic Memory Law. The legislation was passed with 128 votes in favor, 113 votes against and 18 abstentions in the Congress of Deputies, the lower house of the Spanish parliament. The purpose of the law is to heal some of the open […]]]>

EARLIER this month, the Socialist Party-led central government approved a new bill: the Democratic Memory Law. The legislation was passed with 128 votes in favor, 113 votes against and 18 abstentions in the Congress of Deputies, the lower house of the Spanish parliament.

The purpose of the law is to heal some of the open wounds that remain from the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and the subsequent dictatorship of Francisco Franco. It is based on the law on historical memory adopted in 2007 by another administration of the Socialist Party and which recognized the victims of the conflict and the dictatorship.

The central government plans to allocate 13.95 million euros for the new law in the 2023 budget, but it will have to act quickly if it wants to get things done. With just over a year to go before another general election in Spain, poll leader Alberto Núñez Feijóo of the main opposition Popular Party (PP) has pledged to repeal the s he came to power. Moreover, the remaining victims are now of advanced age.

Here are some of the main points included in the legislation:

Valley of the Dead. The controversial Civil War memorial features prominently in the law. The name will be changed to Valley of Cuelgamuros, in reference to the local area, and no figure linked to Franco’s military coup, civil war or dictatorship will be honored there. Franco’s body was exhumed from the site in 2019 and the family of the founder of the fascist Falange party, José Antonio Primo de Rivera, announced this week that they would move his remains ahead of the government. The government also wants to make the monument a place of memory, with an explanation of its history and a tribute to the victims.

A DNA database. The law will also seek to better respond to the many victims of war and the Franco era whose bodies lie in unmarked graves. The plan is for regular excavations to search for these remains, and if found, the land will be temporarily expropriated by the state. A DNA database of victims from that time will be created. The search for the missing dead will represent 60% of the total budget allocated to the new law, according to figures quoted by the Spanish daily El País

Cancellation of sentences. Under the law, all sentences handed down by Franco-era courts will be overturned.

Cancellation of titles, medals and pensions. Any title granted by the Franco regime will be eliminated, while a full case-by-case review of any pensions or other financial rewards that have been granted will also come under scrutiny. Improved education. The legislation will seek to address the lack of education in Spanish schools about the Civil War and the Franco era. This proposal can however be complicated, given that the Spanish regions are in charge of education and those governed by the PP with the extreme right Vox will oppose such a decision.

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The founder of the Spanish fascist Phalange party will be exhumed from the valley of the dead by his family https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-founder-of-the-spanish-fascist-phalange-party-will-be-exhumed-from-the-valley-of-the-dead-by-his-family/ Wed, 12 Oct 2022 07:45:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-founder-of-the-spanish-fascist-phalange-party-will-be-exhumed-from-the-valley-of-the-dead-by-his-family/ THE family of José Antonio Primo de Rivera, the founder of Spain’s fascist Falange party, has announced that they will privately exhume the politician’s remains from the Valley of the Fallen monument, before the central government does so under of a new law on historical memory. A statement from the family, seen by the Spanish […]]]>

THE family of José Antonio Primo de Rivera, the founder of Spain’s fascist Falange party, has announced that they will privately exhume the politician’s remains from the Valley of the Fallen monument, before the central government does so under of a new law on historical memory.

A statement from the family, seen by the Spanish daily ABCsaid the exhumation would be “a strictly private family affair” and not a “public spectacle” which could provoke “clashes between Spaniards”.

Primo de Rivera’s remains, the statement continued, “will be interred in the location chosen by the family.”

The family complained it would be “the fourth time” his remains had been moved since his death.

For his part, central government sources said ABC that the executive was “grateful for the family’s willingness to proceed with the exhumation and to comply with the Democratic Memory Act”.

People visiting Franco’s grave in the Valley of the Fallen before his exhumation in 2019.

The Socialist-led government in Spain recently passed this legislation, which aims to bring “justice, reparation and dignity” to the victims of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39) and the military dictatorship of Francisco Franco.

Primo de Rivera, who was the eldest son of the Spanish dictator, General Miguel Primo de Rivera, was a supporter of the coup against the Spanish republic that started the civil war.

He was imprisoned before the start of the conflict and was executed during his first months. He was interred in the Basilica of the Valley of the Fallen in 1959.

At the end of 2019, Franco’s remains were exhumed from the Valley of the Dead by order of the government, despite the opposition of those close to him.

The monument, which is located in the Guadarrama mountains near Madrid, was defined by Franco as a place of “national atonement” and reconciliation.

But it has always been a controversial site, not only for housing the remains of Franco and Primo de Rivera, but also because victims from the losing Republican side of the conflict were buried there without the consent or knowledge of their families.

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Spain to move remains of Franco’s allies to more inconspicuous graves https://faaeeantrapologia.com/spain-to-move-remains-of-francos-allies-to-more-inconspicuous-graves/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 13:43:56 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/spain-to-move-remains-of-francos-allies-to-more-inconspicuous-graves/ Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, founder of the Spanish fascist Falange party who died at the start of the civil war, is buried in an imposing basilica near Madrid – Copyright AFP JALAA MAREY Spain plans to move the remains of two far-right figures linked to its 1936-1939 civil war who are buried in grandiose […]]]>

Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, founder of the Spanish fascist Falange party who died at the start of the civil war, is buried in an imposing basilica near Madrid – Copyright AFP JALAA MAREY

Spain plans to move the remains of two far-right figures linked to its 1936-1939 civil war who are buried in grandiose sites, a minister announced on Thursday.

In remarks to Cadena Ser radio, Minister Felix Bolanos said new legislation passed this week would affect the grave of Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, founder of Spain’s fascist Falange party, who died at the start of the civil war and was buried in an imposing state. mausoleum near Madrid.

The Basilica in the Valley of the Fallen is where the remains of dictator Francisco Franco were laid after his death in 1975 until they were moved to a more discreet grave by Spain’s leftist government in October 2019.

It would also affect the grave of Nationalist General Gonzalo Queipo de Llano, an ally of Franco who led a military campaign in the south during the Civil War and who is said to have given the go-ahead for the murder of Spanish poet Federico Garcia Lorca.

He is buried in the iconic Macarena Basilica in Seville.

Asked if the law would mean his remains would be moved, Bolanos said it would affect anyone involved in the coup that sparked the war and the dictatorship that followed.

“The new law says there can be no prominent place for people involved in the dictatorship or coup,” Bolanos said of landmark legislation passed by parliament this week to honor the victims of Francoism.

“This is not only the case of Queipo de Llano, but also of Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, who is buried in front of the main altar (of the basilica)… which is an important place,” he said. he declares.

“Once the legislation comes into effect, the work will begin,” Bolanos said without giving further details.

“Obviously they should be buried with dignity where the parents decide, but they cannot be in an important place because it is a way of paying homage to the protagonists of the dictatorship.”

Honoring those who died or suffered violence or repression during the war and the decades of dictatorship that followed has been a top priority for Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez since coming to power in 2018.

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