Falange – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 10:10:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png Falange – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ 32 32 PrimoHoagies to open store in Rockaway https://faaeeantrapologia.com/primohoagies-to-open-store-in-rockaway/ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/primohoagies-to-open-store-in-rockaway/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 17:58:29 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/primohoagies-to-open-store-in-rockaway/ Westville’s sub-sandwich chain PrimoHoagies will open a store in Rockaway, its second store in North Jersey, on October 19. The franchise location is owned by locals Felix Galinsky and Anthony Phalange, who also own another location. Galinsky and Phalange opened their first PrimoHoagies location in Mahwah last year, and despite the ongoing pandemic “have found […]]]>

Westville’s sub-sandwich chain PrimoHoagies will open a store in Rockaway, its second store in North Jersey, on October 19.

The franchise location is owned by locals Felix Galinsky and Anthony Phalange, who also own another location.

Galinsky and Phalange opened their first PrimoHoagies location in Mahwah last year, and despite the ongoing pandemic “have found great success in this new venture thanks in large part to the hard work and dedication of their team,” said the company in a press release.

PrimoHoagies plans 18 new stores in 2021. – PRIMOHOAGIES

“As an Italian-American, I can say that our menu is above the rest, both in terms of quality and offerings,” said Phalange. “We look forward to continuing to strengthen our presence in northern New Jersey. “

The 2,200 square foot store will create 15 jobs and provide take-out, delivery, catering and limited indoor seating.

The first PrimoHoagies location opened in South Philadelphia in 1992 and, since relocating its headquarters to Westville, has expanded to several states, including Colorado, Florida, and Pennsylvania, in accordance with announced agreements more early this year.

The first 100 customers online at 10 a.m. on opening day will receive free hoagies, with special-priced hoagies available throughout the day.

The restaurant, located at 395 Mt. Hope Ave., will be open daily from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.


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German election: ramifications for US foreign policy https://faaeeantrapologia.com/german-election-ramifications-for-us-foreign-policy/ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/german-election-ramifications-for-us-foreign-policy/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:05:39 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/german-election-ramifications-for-us-foreign-policy/ After 60 years, the leaders of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) have returned to the organization’s birthplace in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia. During the two-day meeting hosted by the Government of Serbia, the 60th anniversary was marked with inspirational speeches, leaders reaffirmed their collective commitment to strengthen the principles and multiple tasks defined 60 years […]]]>

After 60 years, the leaders of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) have returned to the organization’s birthplace in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia. During the two-day meeting hosted by the Government of Serbia, the 60th anniversary was marked with inspirational speeches, leaders reaffirmed their collective commitment to strengthen the principles and multiple tasks defined 60 years ago.

As the pandemic spread, developing countries seized the opportunity and strongly demanded a more equitable global distribution of Covid-19 vaccines and more funding from rich countries to help the poorest adapt. to a warmer world.

Speakers particularly criticized world powers for not fairly sharing vaccines, suggesting poor countries were at the mercy of powerful states piling up supplies.

“We are observers of a global power game and are subject to the benevolence of powerful countries which distribute their accumulated (vaccine) reserves at their own pace,” Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo said at the meeting in Belgrade. .

Akufo-Addo told the rally that “60 years later, the great powers have not disarmed, and the threat of nuclear war has not receded either. They are still as powerful as they were then, and this has been evidenced by the Covid pandemic and the unsavory policy of vaccine nationalism we are witnessing today. “

He lamented the fact that NAM member states have become a global power play and are subject to the benevolence of powerful countries, which distribute their accumulated reserves at their own pace, not necessarily in accordance with realities.

“The need for self-sufficiency today in the countries of the South is as important as positive neutralism was in the days of the Cold War. The impact of the pandemic on our populations has been severe. We need to stand side by side and be determined to make sure we are better prepared for future pandemics, ”Akufo-Addo said.

He continued: “We must not miss this opportunity to take far-reaching decisions for a more equitable and balanced world, based on the principle of the equality of sovereign states. We must continue to work for the global goals of peace, development and interdependence.

While stressing the importance of protecting the interests of the developing world, Akufo-Addo further recalled “that there will be challenges, but by working hand in hand, we can move forward together, through cooperation and solidarity. , and achieve the restructuring of the global financial system to facilitate the rapid development of our economies. The next sixty (60) years of the movement must mark its emancipation to meet the wishes and aspirations of development, dignity and diversity.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has urged rich countries to allocate half of the funds they provide to developing countries to tackle climate change to help those countries adapt and survive in a warming world.

“Fifty percent of all climate finance provided by developed countries and multilateral development banks should go to adaptation, to resilience,” Guterres said in a video message at the opening of a two-part meeting. days.

Rich countries are under increasing pressure to keep their broken pledge, made in 2009, to send $ 100 billion a year to help fund an adequate response by developing countries to rising global temperatures as the world braces for for COP26.

Of the funding channeled by rich countries to help poorer countries cope with climate change, adaptation has normally only accounted for around 20%, or an average of around $ 30 billion per year in 2017- 18. Most of the rest has been devoted to reducing emissions from global warming, for example by switching to renewable energies.

Guterres warned rich economies to step up efforts to help developing countries tackle “biodiversity loss, pollution and climate change” and further called on the Group of 20 rich countries to do more to help vaccinate the planet against the new coronavirus.

The observer status in the Non-Alignment Movement (NAM) that Russia has obtained opens up new opportunities for interaction to ensure global security and sustainable development, Russian President Vladimir Putin said in his message to participants at the MNA jubilee meeting posted on the Kremlin website.

The Non-Alignment Movement plays a fairly important role as an international organization on the world stage, the Russian leader said.

“This [the Non-Alignment Movement] systematically protects the principles of unconditional equality of all States, respect for their sovereignty and legitimate interests and promotes constructive multilateral dialogue in strict compliance with the letter and spirit of the United Nations Charter ”, Mr. Putin stressed.

The non-alignment movementThis positive potential is especially needed now that “the situation in the world is becoming increasingly turbulent and humanity is facing an increasing number of threats and challenges,” the post read.

“It is important to note that this reputable and representative structure is actively engaged in the resolution of crises and makes a considerable contribution to collective efforts aimed at building a more democratic and stable world order, and at strengthening trust and mutual understanding between members of the international community, “said the Russian leader. noted.

“Our country recently obtained observer status within the Non-Alignment Movement. This certainly opens up new opportunities for interaction to resolve key regional and global issues and ensure security and sustainable development in the world, ”Putin said.

Although many members of the Non-Aligned Movement are actually quite close to China or the Soviet Union, the movement persisted throughout the Cold War, despite several conflicts between members that also threatened the movement.

In the years following the end of the Cold War in 1991, he focused on developing multilateral ties and connections as well as unity among the developing countries of the world, especially those in the Global South. .

The Non-Alignment Movement is an international organization of member states that oppose participation in military-political blocs and promote the peaceful coexistence of peoples. Her 60th birthday brought together mothers of 100 countries, with 43 delegations led by foreign ministers. After the United Nations, it is the largest group of states in the world.

Ghana’s first president, Osagyefo Dr Kwame Nkrumah, was one of the Movement’s five historic founding fathers. Indian Jawaharlal Nehru, Indonesian Ahmed Sukarno, Egyptian Gamel Abdel Nasser and ex-Yugoslavia Josip Broz Tito started the Movement in Belgrade in 1961.


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PARALLEL MOTHERS is a striking and messy portrayal of motherhood https://faaeeantrapologia.com/parallel-mothers-is-a-striking-and-messy-portrayal-of-motherhood/ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/parallel-mothers-is-a-striking-and-messy-portrayal-of-motherhood/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 18:49:04 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/parallel-mothers-is-a-striking-and-messy-portrayal-of-motherhood/ Families are an ocean of complications and contradictions. And just as we carry the love and stories of those who came before us, we also carry the heartache and baggage that shapes our lives. Pedro Almodóvar’s latest film, Parallel mothers, is a moving and tense portrait of motherhood and family, both blood and found. Written […]]]>

Families are an ocean of complications and contradictions. And just as we carry the love and stories of those who came before us, we also carry the heartache and baggage that shapes our lives. Pedro Almodóvar’s latest film, Parallel mothers, is a moving and tense portrait of motherhood and family, both blood and found. Written and directed by Almodóvar, the film follows two women on their way to motherhood, whose lives become entangled due to a messy and consequential turn of events.

Janis and Ana, roommates in a hospital in Madrid, prepare to give birth. Both single, their pregnancies unplanned. The prospect of becoming a mom turns Janis on. It is an experience at the antipodes for Ana, who is not yet 18 years old and lives with her former actress mother following the said pregnancy. Her pregnancy is much more traumatic.

Ana and Janis, both very pregnant, stand in the hallway of a maternity ward in a hospital

Sony Pictures Classics

Penélope Cruz anchors the film in the role of Janis, a nearly 40-year-old photographer who sees this pregnancy as her desire to become a mother. Janis is a rich and complex character, and Cruz makes her feel just as multidimensional as Janis learns a disturbing truth that will change the course of her life and that of Ana. Newcomer Milena Smit is incredibly expressive as Ana, conveying so many emotions with just a look. Janis is clearly in the lead, but it’s the on-screen dynamics of Cruz and Smit that makes everything work.

Adding a rich layer to the film is a major subplot focusing on the still open wounds of the Spanish Civil War some 80 years later. The fascists murdered Janis’ great-grandfather, along with nearly a dozen others. She hires archaeologist Arturo (Israel Elejalde) to conduct an excavation of the known location of a mass grave on the outskirts of her hometown. Janis’ promise to her grandmother that she would find justice for her great-grandfather and give him a decent funeral gives the film a deep line.

For Janis, it was the source of a generational trauma, an experience that deeply shaped her family, even almost a century later. Ana and Janis are a generation apart, and the way the Spanish Civil War shaped each of them varies widely. Janis, raised by the grandmother whose father was torn from her family by the phalanxes, understands the pain perfectly, bubbling just below the surface. However, coming from a young generation and a family whose family does not endure the same trauma, Ana is only introduced to this particular experience by Janis.

It’s a well-rounded and moving subplot, which never feels heavy. Almodóvar’s decision to weave a subplot bringing the pain of the Spanish Civil War era into the 21st century is an overtly political decision by Almodóvar. Certainly during the resurgence of far-right ideology in the world. But the rise in power is spectacular, especially during the last particularly moving minutes.

Janis and Ana kiss in Parallel Mothers movie

Janis and Ana kiss in Parallel Mothers movie

Sony Pictures Classics

While Janis spends much of the film trying to end her family, especially the late grandmother who raised her, Ana’s family is still plagued with open, festering wounds. Most notably with her mother, Teresa (Aitana Sánchez-Gijón), who divorced her father to become an actress when she was young. Finally reaching her professional tempo, Teresa has her own complicated relationship with motherhood and her career, and how society’s expectations of motherhood shattered her relationship with Ana as she continued her career.

Parallel mothers reunites Almodóvar with several of his frequent collaborators, including his brother, Agustín Almodóvar, and Esther Garcia, who produced the film. (And, of course, Cruz, who has now appeared in eight of Almodóvar’s films.) Alberto Iglesias’ magnificent melancholy score adds nostalgia and tension as Janis struggles with a devastating truth.

Parts of the plot seem familiar. In particular, the main plot point that the drama points to throughout the second act. But Almodóvar doesn’t necessarily try to shock us with the expected turn. Instead, the film focuses more on the very human response to unexpected and changing situations. Messy, totally flawed, and heartbreaking, even when a particular decision is downright frustrating. Parallel mothers is a painful, often contained melodrama. The film is all about flawed people and the devastating decisions they make. But it’s also cathartic and at least somewhat optimistic. And, remarkably human. It’s a big turning point for Almodóvar, tackling a dark period in recent Spanish history woven through this story of new life and heartbreak. While not all aspects fit together perfectly, it’s a moving and engaging story that’s worth every big attempt.

4/5

The PARALLEL MOTHERS post is a striking and messy portrayal of motherhood that first appeared on Nerdist.


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‘The Jew is to blame’: young neo-fascists in Spain spark outrage https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-jew-is-to-blame-young-neo-fascists-in-spain-spark-outrage/ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-jew-is-to-blame-young-neo-fascists-in-spain-spark-outrage/#respond Fri, 16 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-jew-is-to-blame-young-neo-fascists-in-spain-spark-outrage/ A tribute to the Blue Division highlights the growing radicalization among young Spaniards. Neo-fascist Isabel Medina Peralta giving a Nazi salute after an anti-Semitic speech on February 13. (Source: Ruptly video) Dr Carmen Aguilera-Carnerero is Senior Lecturer in the Department of English and German Philology at the University of Granada (Spain) as well as Senior […]]]>

A tribute to the Blue Division highlights the growing radicalization among young Spaniards.

Neo-fascist Isabel Medina Peralta giving a Nazi salute after an anti-Semitic speech on February 13. (Source: Ruptly video)

Dr Carmen Aguilera-Carnerero is Senior Lecturer in the Department of English and German Philology at the University of Granada (Spain) as well as Senior Researcher at the Center for Radical Law Analysis (CARR).

On February 13, an event honoring the soldiers of the División Azul (the Blue Division or the Spanish Division of Volunteers) took place at the Almudena Cemetery in Madrid. The winners, a group of 14,000 young men, both soldiers and Phalangists, fought for Hitler in World War II to restore the Führer’s previous support to Francisco Franco during the Spanish Civil War.

The event was organized by Juventud Patriótica (Patriotic Youth), a neo-Nazi group from Madrid and supported by España 2000 and La Phalange, two far-right Spanish groups. About 300 people attended the event, some of whom wore Nazi badges and carried neo-fascist flags while giving fascist salutes. Among them all, the presence of a young woman – not even 20 – holding a megaphone stands out from the crowd in her blue phalanx shirt.

Her name was Isabel Medina Peralta, a history student, and she was shouting anti-Semitic slogans never heard before, at least in democratic times. Isabel told the participants of the event “It is our supreme duty to fight for Spain and for a Europe now weakened and destroyed by the enemy” (“es nuestra suprema obligación luchar por España y por una Europa ahora debil y liquidada por el enemigo) as well as “the enemy will always be the same, even if he wears different masks: the Jew, because there is nothing more certain than this affirmation: the Jew is to blame” ( el “enemigo que siempre va a ser el mismo, aunque con distintas máscaras: el judío, porque nada hay más certero que esta afirmación: el judío es el guilty”).

These kinds of assertions shook Spanish public opinion to the point that Twitter closed her personal account two days later when she had been proclaiming the same kind of message for years. Yet she immediately opened a new one afterwards.

The Jewish community in Spain is really rare; barely 45,000 of them live in Spain, according to data provided by the Federation of Jewish Communities in Spain (FCJE). Although it is inevitable about the relevance of the Jews in the history of Spain (also known as Sephardic Jews), the historical event most relevant to them was probably the expulsion of the entire community by the Catholic Kings in 1492, the culmination of a tragic period in which the Inquisition relentlessly pursued them.

Franco’s attitude towards Jews has been discussed by historians and academics whose views oscillate between the dictator’s friendly attitude towards Jews during the Holocaust and deep anti-Semitism. In 2015, the Spanish government passed a law by which Sephardic Jews proved the connection to the country (via surnames or knowledge of the language, among other conditions) could return to Spain and obtain citizenship. By 2019, nearly 6,000 Jews had acquired Spanish citizenship, although they are still demographically distant from the nearly 2 million Muslims living in Spain.

Times like these require relentless truth. We are proud to be funded by readers. If you like our work, support our journalism.

Isabel Medina Peralta describes herself as a fascist and a national socialist. She rejects any affiliation or even distance connection or sympathy with VOX or any conservative party, which Isabel despises for seeing the nation as a symbol rather than focusing on her people, which she does not. The young history student accepts the potential effects of her words and believes that sooner or later they will lead her to prison, a time she plans to invest in writing a book. Indeed, the “new muse of Spanish fascism” has accused the Abascal party of favoritism and electoral propaganda since Rocío Monasterio, president of VOX in Madrid, wrote a tweet supporting the community and Jewish associations after the outrageous speech .

Isabel’s speech elicited mainly two types of reactions: either people thought that she was just a person in search of popularity, an anecdote that brought to life old ghosts from a past, totally disconnected from current problems. in Spain or cited it as a representative pledge of the growing polarization of discourse in Spanish society. Either way, Isabel’s speech brought out some key issues. On the one hand, he exposed a growing global problem of radicalization among young people, to which young Spaniards are no strangers. On the other hand, he brought back to the table the old debate on hate speech, the need to regulate it legally and the limits of free speech.

Regarding the first, Isabel belongs to the Phalange Española and the Bastión Frontal group. The latter is a radical organization born during the containment of COVID-19 with just over 100 members, most of whom come from other organizations like Hogar Social and have ties to other radical groups like San Blas Crew or the Conquista. del Estado. They shouted on the first day the leader of Unidas Podemos, Pablo Iglesias, as the official candidate for the Community of Madrid.

A study conducted by the SM Foundation launched in 2017 on the behaviors and attitudes of Spanish millennials revealed the growing ideological radicalization of this generation, as one in five young people (out of a total sample of 1,250) supported either the extreme left or the radical right. . The latest events in Spain, such as Isabel Medina’s speech or, conversely, the street violence that took place for several days after the imprisonment of rapper Hasél seem to be proof of this. Generation Z, to which Isabel belongs, seems to be following the same trend.

Regarding the need to regulate (or not) hate speech, some legal measures have been taken. The FCJE, the Movement against Intolerance and the Platform against Antisemitism have announced that they will use all legal means to bring this event to court. Similarly, the Madrid public prosecutor’s office has called for an investigation to determine whether the speech can actually qualify as a hate crime. Articles 510 and 570 of the Spanish Penal Code which regulate freedom of expression are formulated very loosely, hence the possibility of different interpretations.

Several academics and experts in the field have pointed out the dangers of a law that could restrict citizens’ freedom of expression. For example, they could lead to what is known as the ‘chilling effect’ – whereby citizens or groups are deterred from giving opinions or thoughts for fear of breaking the law and being used by governments to act as a deterrent. impose censorship in the name of protecting certain groups. or rights.

Although currently the Jewish community in Spain is small, they also suffer indiscriminate attacks duly reported by the FECJ and prosecuted when necessary. The same happens to Muslims and other minority groups. Due to the growing polarization of the younger generations that we talked about above, the need for a serious debate on hate speech in Spanish society seems indispensable. And even the desire to rethink the legislation on this subject.

Unfortunately, the history of the twentieth century is full of examples where hate speech has always been the prelude to genocides, wars or attacks of all kinds. The internet, while the easily named culprit, is not always to blame, hence the examples of the Holocaust, the Rwandan genocide or the Balkans in the age of social media. This does not mean that the debate on Internet regulation is not another essential subject to be addressed. Nonetheless, this should not obscure other issues that Isabel’s speech exposed, such as the need to foster critical thinking learning among students. Whatever the outcome, this kind of debate should always be preventative rather than post-incident lamentation (however large).

This article is brought to you by the Center for Analysis of the Radical Right (CARR). Through its research, CARR intends to conduct discussions on the development of radical right-wing extremism around the world.

Rantt Media and ZipRecruiter


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Franco-fascism / neo-Nazism still dies hard in Spain: “Our enemy is the Jew” | Shimon samuels https://faaeeantrapologia.com/franco-fascism-neo-nazism-still-dies-hard-in-spain-our-enemy-is-the-jew-shimon-samuels/ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/franco-fascism-neo-nazism-still-dies-hard-in-spain-our-enemy-is-the-jew-shimon-samuels/#respond Tue, 16 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/franco-fascism-neo-nazism-still-dies-hard-in-spain-our-enemy-is-the-jew-shimon-samuels/ The Spanish Civil War has left scars so far, dividing families and ideological movements from the far right to the far left. The troops and arms supply of Hitler and Mussolini brought Franco to power as a prelude to World War II. Although the fascist government declared neutrality, it continued its military cooperation with Nazi […]]]>

The Spanish Civil War has left scars so far, dividing families and ideological movements from the far right to the far left.

The troops and arms supply of Hitler and Mussolini brought Franco to power as a prelude to World War II.

Although the fascist government declared neutrality, it continued its military cooperation with Nazi Germany. About 47,000 Spanish volunteers, mostly from Franco Phalangists, fought mainly on the Eastern Front against the Soviet Union, first under the name of the Blue Division / Legion, then in the Waffen SS.

The Allies warned Franco that the Blue Legion was a violation of Spanish neutrality, particularly as a result of its role in the Battle of Krasny Bor on February 13, 1943, about 12 miles southeast of Leningrad (St. Petersburg ).

This year, Saturday February 13 – 78th anniversary – some 300 people marched through Madrid to the cemetery of La Almudena, paying homage to the División Azul (Blue Division), convened by the neo-Nazi groups: Juventud Patriota (Patriotic Youth) , España 2000 and La Phalange.

Carrying banners in honor of “the honor and glory of the dead”, arms outstretched in Hitler salute, they sang fascist songs. One speaker said: “It is our duty to fight for Spain and to fight for Europe, now weak and liquidated by the enemy. Our enemy will always be the same, even under different masks… The Jew is guilty and the Blue Division fought for this reason.

Wreaths designed in Nazi swastikas were placed on the monument.

The Wiesenthal Center has, for more than thirty years, followed the Nazi line of escape from Spain to Latin America, discovering the Nazis residing along the Costa Blanca, present in the trials of neo-Nazi editors based in Spain and in auctions of Nazi souvenirs.

What is most disturbing about the march of the “Blue Division” is the massive participation of young people. There is clearly an educational break that requires a program on the dangers of neofascism in Spain and the incitement to anti-Semitic hatred and violence that accompanies it which cannot be confused with freedom of expression.

Sadly, Franco’s fascism / neo-Nazism still dies hard in contemporary Spain.

Shimon Samuels is Director of International Relations at the Simon Wiesenthal Center. He was deputy director of the Leonard Davis Institute for International Relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, European director of ADL and Israeli director of AJC. He was born in UK and studied in UK, Israel, USA and Japan.


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This is American fascism | open democracy https://faaeeantrapologia.com/this-is-american-fascism-open-democracy/ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/this-is-american-fascism-open-democracy/#respond Thu, 14 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/this-is-american-fascism-open-democracy/ When one scratches beneath the surface, it becomes evident that many of these exonerations of the Franco regime as non-fascist potentially reflect academics’ own blind spots and sexism – ignoring the central role of one of the most powerful women in the world. Spain, Pilar Primo de Rivera, who headed the state-run “Phalanx Women’s Section” […]]]>

When one scratches beneath the surface, it becomes evident that many of these exonerations of the Franco regime as non-fascist potentially reflect academics’ own blind spots and sexism – ignoring the central role of one of the most powerful women in the world. Spain, Pilar Primo de Rivera, who headed the state-run “Phalanx Women’s Section” for more than four decades as heir to her brother’s fascist legacy. She was even proposed at one point as a potential wife of Adolf Hitler. A woman of immense power, she influenced education nationally and endeavored to instill fascist ideologies in young people through a “national Catholic” program – reflected in particular in books for children and educational programs of the time.

Franco, too, ardently defended the “national Catholicism” which linked religion to Spanish identity. His imagery and rhetoric attempted to match that of 15th-century Isabelle and Ferdinand, the two “Catholic kings” who, in 1492, expelled Muslims and Jews from Spain and began conquering the Americas. The deeply anti-Semitic Franco couldn’t go after the Jews in Spain because there simply wasn’t such a large Jewish population in the country; instead, Franco attacked communists, anarchists, socialists, gays and immigrants. He also stoked conspiracies of secret Masonic and Jewish cabals.

Today, in the right-wing media in the United States, similar rhetoric is frequently used against “globalists”, “Communist and Socialist Democrats” and “Hollywood”. The similarities don’t end there. The Franco regime frequently brandished the slogan “Una, Grande y Libre! (One, Great and Free) – a slogan one could easily imagine chanted at a Trump rally.

Comparatively, like Franco, Trump had no qualms about using images of Christianity to his advantage. Moreover, one can certainly see that a sort of “Christian nationalism” has developed in right-wing circles in the United States, advocated by Steve Bannon, Betsy DeVos and a slew of cronies. Trump created anti-Muslim policies, placed migrants in concentration camps, attacked transgender people, and, as Franco did with Mussolini and Hitler, desperately tried to forge alliances with dictators around the world. While history doesn’t repeat itself, it does, it certainly rhymes, and Trump’s ideology and political agenda is certainly a strain of fascism. The Trump brand is particularly Islamophobic, misogynist, racist, xenophobic, queerphobic, and against liberalism and socialism.

Not a checklist, but a formula with variables

Some researchers have attempted to create a sort of “fascist checklist”: is there a strongman figure? Is there violence? Are they using an imaginary past to legitimize their actions? Is there a militarized police? Imperialist tendencies?


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Fine for displaying Franco flags in Sa Pobla Mallorca https://faaeeantrapologia.com/fine-for-displaying-franco-flags-in-sa-pobla-mallorca/ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/fine-for-displaying-franco-flags-in-sa-pobla-mallorca/#respond Tue, 21 Jul 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/fine-for-displaying-franco-flags-in-sa-pobla-mallorca/ The flags were withdrawn after the intervention of the police in Sa Pobla. 28-04-2020 The secretariat of the regional government for democratic memory imposed a fine of 2,001 euros on a resident of Sa Pobla for having hung two Franco flags in the street. The flags appeared along Calle Marina on a Saturday afternoon in […]]]>

The flags were withdrawn after the intervention of the police in Sa Pobla.

The secretariat of the regional government for democratic memory imposed a fine of 2,001 euros on a resident of Sa Pobla for having hung two Franco flags in the street.

The flags appeared along Calle Marina on a Saturday afternoon in late April. They were considered a serious violation of the Balearic Law on Democratic Remembrance and Recognition, which prohibits any demonstration involving the recognition of Francoism or the exaltation of the military uprising of 1936. Fines for this range from 2,000 to 10,000 euros.

One of the flags was a Spanish flag with the eagle of San Juan (Saint John); the other was the flag of the Phalanx. The flags have garnered a lot of attention on social media and police in Sa Pobla have flagged the resident for alleged violation of the law. The flags were withdrawn, but the case was taken up by the secretariat.

The law states that owners will be responsible for the removal or disposal of any symbol “contrary to democratic memory which is placed on private buildings and projected in public space”. In addition to flags, these symbols include shields, badges and plaques or references to Francoism.

The resident has the right to appeal the decision of the secretariat.


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Counting the wounds still left by the Spanish Civil War https://faaeeantrapologia.com/counting-the-wounds-still-left-by-the-spanish-civil-war/ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/counting-the-wounds-still-left-by-the-spanish-civil-war/#respond Tue, 14 Jan 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/counting-the-wounds-still-left-by-the-spanish-civil-war/ But what about the man himself? The task of finding the real Manuel Mena could not have been more difficult. His relatives burned his belongings, including his papers, after his death. Cercas managed to find an elderly couple of ladies whose memories suggested that as a boy, Mena was a “heartless kid”. But then he […]]]>

But what about the man himself? The task of finding the real Manuel Mena could not have been more difficult. His relatives burned his belongings, including his papers, after his death. Cercas managed to find an elderly couple of ladies whose memories suggested that as a boy, Mena was a “heartless kid”. But then he interviewed classmates who described how, under the influence of a local schoolteacher, Mena developed a passion for knowledge and became a much more thoughtful and responsible teenager.

Cercas gives himself some postmodern latitude in this narrative, speculating every now and then as to how, if he shed any pretense of not being a novelist, he would fill in the gaps in his story. But his reconstructions are fairly closely tied to known historical facts, and there is no doubt that he invested a tremendous amount of time and effort into unearthing what little there was to know about Manuel Mena. However, halfway through the book, its subject remains “a fuzzy, distant, schematic figure, without humanity or moral complexity, as rigid, cold and abstract as a statue”.

Things start to change when he receives the notes of a speech Mena gave on leave from the front lines. Cercas’s great-uncle was a fascist, a follower of the Phalanx. But, as Cercas shows with a quote from its founder, José Antonio Primo de Rivera, which Mena had written, the Phalanx had views not so far removed from those that would ignite the passions of a generation of young Spaniards after 1968. , those valiant successors of Achilles who fought Franco’s riot police with stones and Molotov cocktails:

“There is a capitalist system with expensive credit, with abusive privileges of shareholders and bondholders, without work, which takes most of the production and sinks and impoverishes employers, businessmen and workers.

What finally gives life to Mena to her grandnephew is the memory of a family member of what the now hardened in combat alfez provisional said to his brother during one of his last holidays: he was fed up with the war and wished not to have to return to the front. Suddenly, he “had become a man of flesh and blood, a simple self-respecting muchacho disillusioned with his ideals and a lost soldier in someone else’s war, who no longer knew why he was fighting.


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Franco’s exhumation plan reveals unresolved tensions https://faaeeantrapologia.com/francos-exhumation-plan-reveals-unresolved-tensions/ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/francos-exhumation-plan-reveals-unresolved-tensions/#respond Thu, 03 Oct 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/francos-exhumation-plan-reveals-unresolved-tensions/ José Antonio, a retired mechanic from Granada, in southern Spain, decided this week to say “one last goodbye” to Francisco Franco. So he drove the five and a half hours to the Basilica of the Valley of the Dead, a giant complex near Madrid that the former dictator ordered to dig into the rock, from […]]]>

José Antonio, a retired mechanic from Granada, in southern Spain, decided this week to say “one last goodbye” to Francisco Franco.

So he drove the five and a half hours to the Basilica of the Valley of the Dead, a giant complex near Madrid that the former dictator ordered to dig into the rock, from where Franco’s remains could soon be moved. .

José Antonio, who, like many other visitors to the enclosure, was reluctant to give his full name, remembers the days “when one could walk safely in the street, even if there was no not so much democracy and freedom ”.

He was far from being alone in his feelings. On the same morning this week, a man from the Rioja region gave the fascist salute at Franco’s grave, which was covered with so many bouquets of fresh flowers that the inscription was barely visible.

Several people placed medallions and watches on the stone slab, as if to imbibe the spirit of the dictator, then grabbed them and hugged them.

Such views may soon become a thing of the past. Spain’s Supreme Court ruled last week that there should be no obstacles to exhuming Franco’s body from the state-owned site, dismissing a lawsuit brought by the dictator’s grandchildren.

“We are closing a dark chapter in our history,” proclaimed Pedro Sánchez, Spain’s Socialist Prime Minister, at the United Nations General Assembly in New York shortly after. “No enemy of democracy deserves to lie in a place of worship or institutional respect.”

Francisco Franco speaking in Bilbao in 1939 © AFP

The Valley of the Dead is officially a memorial to the war dead on both sides and contains the remains of 33,000 people – but the only graves marked are those of Franco and José Antonio Primo de Rivera, the founder of the fascist Phalange, who was shot down by Spanish Republicans in 1936.

Mr. Sánchez wishes to proceed with the exhumation of Franco, whose 36-year reign did not end until his death in 1975, before the Spanish legislative elections on 10 November.

The dictator is reportedly buried next to his wife, Carmen Polo, in a private family crypt on the outskirts of Madrid, where police are permanently stationed and fascist protests could be difficult to mount.

But the question is whether, rather than closing a chapter, Mr Sánchez’s plans ignite old tensions.

“What’s next? Isabel Díaz Ayuso, who heads the center-right government of the Greater Madrid region, asked Thursday. “Will the parish churches burn down as in [19]36? “

Historian Sir Paul Preston, author of works including a biography of Franco accusing the dictator’s nationalists of planning mass murders during the Civil War of 1936-1939, said he was naive when he noted, Thirty years ago, it was a “matter of the times” before Spain’s divisions over the dictator died down. “Spain has never known the kind of denazification process that Germany and Italy have known,” he said.

The equivalent of the Valley of the Dead, which was largely built by Republican prisoners and is marked by the largest stone cross in the world, “would be a monument to Hitler just outside Berlin,” a- he added.

But, he said, he had the “almost shameful reaction” that although re-burying Franco was “absolutely what should have happened … wouldn’t it have been better to let the sleeping dogs lie?

Instead, Sánchez’s plans sparked backlash.

Protesters shout slogans and carry banners with the photo of Adolf Hitler and Francisco Franco during a demonstration outside Madrid's Supreme Court calling on the government to ban the burial of Spanish dictator Francisco Franco in the Almudena Cathedral in Madrid, after his exhumation from the Valley of the Fallen, in Madrid, Spain, on September 24, 2019. The banner reads "The criminals".  REUTERS / Juan Medina

Anti-Franco demonstrators in front of the Supreme Court in Madrid © Reuters

The Francisco Franco Foundation, which stores 33,000 documents related to the late dictator and sells Francoist merchandise ranging from wine to CDs, called on its supporters to pray “for his soul and all those who have fallen in love with Spain” at the Valley this Saturday.

He also wrote to Pope Francis, asking him not to allow the exhumation team to access the basilica without the consent of the Franco family and the Benedictine monks who run the complex.

Mr Sánchez’s position has also come under attack from the anti-immigration Vox party, which won 10% of Spain’s elections in April, breaking the mold in a country that has been wary of the far right since Franco’s death.

Juan Chicharro, president of the Franco foundation and retired general in the Spanish navies, said Vox was “a hope, a light, for many Spaniards”.

He portrays the far-right party as a true heir to the Francoist tradition, which he describes as anti-communism, attachment to the unity of Spain and respect for the country’s centuries-old Christian traditions.

Madrid, Spain, October 1, 2019. Juan Chicharro Ortega, head of the Fundación Nacional Francisco Franco, poses for a portrait inside the headquarters of the Fundación.

Juan Chicharro considers the far-right Vox party as a true heir to the Francoist tradition © Gianfranco Tripodo / FT

Some commentators suggest that the planned exhumation of Franco’s remains could help Vox in next month’s election, called after Mr Sánchez failed to form a government, while paying dividends for the acting prime minister.

“Sánchez’s political calculation is that if he can really do it before November 10, he will be seen as someone who has made a historic change that the left has long sought,” said Jorge Galindo, political scientist and columnist.

“It may also be practical for Sánchez for Vox not to be too weak: Vox’s fear helped the Socialists in the April elections and the party wants the right-wing vote to be split.

But Mr Galindo added that the Franco controversy would at most halt Vox’s decline, as opinion polls suggest the party will struggle to maintain its April share of the vote.

Indeed, while many people, mostly elderly, visiting the Valley of the Dead shared the Franco Foundation’s anger at Mr. Sánchez’s plans, even here voices dissented.

“The war dead belong here, but not this man, who put thousands of people here,” said Beatriz, who remembered the fear that half a century ago prevented it. to talk about politics when she went to Madrid.

“It was a dictatorship. . . rather he is with his family.

This article has been modified since its publication to correct an earlier reference to Pope Benedict


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Forbidden fascist anthem played at a Spanish bullfight https://faaeeantrapologia.com/forbidden-fascist-anthem-played-at-a-spanish-bullfight/ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/forbidden-fascist-anthem-played-at-a-spanish-bullfight/#respond Mon, 12 Aug 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/forbidden-fascist-anthem-played-at-a-spanish-bullfight/ A stadium in the Spanish resort of Palma de Mallorca played a banned fascist anthem on Sunday amid controversy over the reintroduction of bullfighting on the Spanish island of Mallorca. The song, known as “Cara al Sol” or “Face au soleil”, was the anthem of the Phalange, the far-right party of Spanish dictator Francisco Franco, […]]]>

A stadium in the Spanish resort of Palma de Mallorca played a banned fascist anthem on Sunday amid controversy over the reintroduction of bullfighting on the Spanish island of Mallorca.

The song, known as “Cara al Sol” or “Face au soleil”, was the anthem of the Phalange, the far-right party of Spanish dictator Francisco Franco, who ruled the country until 1975. Sunday’s game was the first since the song was banned by the local government two years ago, The Guardian reported. The ban was later overturned by the Supreme Court.

As the anthem played, hundreds of demonstrators stood outside the arena to protest, shouting that bullfighting was “torture” rather than an art. Bullfights are frequently reported in the cultural pages of Spanish newspapers.

The Phalangists were a major component of the nationalist side in the Spanish Civil War.

“Anti-Semitic propaganda, including the notorious fictional book ‘The Protocols of the Elders of Zion,’ circulated throughout the territories held by the Nationalists” during the war, according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Among those supporting the fight was Jorge Campos, the local leader of the far-right Vox party. Vox’s platform, whose name means “voice” in Latin, is to defend Spain against what it says are the dangers of separatism, Muslim immigration, feminism and liberals.

In March, the party nominated a Holocaust revisionist as a congressional candidate for the city of Albacete, in central Spain. The candidate, historian Fernando Paz, quickly dropped out of the race, citing the scrutiny he faced in the Spanish media. Other Vox candidates include retired generals who defend Franco’s far-right regime.

In April, Likud’s director of foreign affairs Eli Hazan apologized for backing Vox ahead of the country’s general election on Sunday. Hazan had tweeted good luck to the leader of Vox during the general election and called the extremist party a “sister party to Likud” in the European Parliament.

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