Falange – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 05:31:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png Falange – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ 32 32 Abortion activists storm Catholic churches during Mother’s Day mass https://faaeeantrapologia.com/abortion-activists-storm-catholic-churches-during-mothers-day-mass/ Thu, 05 May 2022 16:24:41 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/abortion-activists-storm-catholic-churches-during-mothers-day-mass/ CV NEWS FEED // A radical abortion group calling itself “Ruth Sent Us” announced this week that it is mobilizing activists to enter Catholic churches during Mass next Sunday in response to reports that the Court supreme is about to cancel Roe against Wade. “Whether you’re a ‘Catholic for Choice,’ an ex-Catholic, other faith or […]]]>

CV NEWS FEED // A radical abortion group calling itself “Ruth Sent Us” announced this week that it is mobilizing activists to enter Catholic churches during Mass next Sunday in response to reports that the Court supreme is about to cancel Roe against Wade.

“Whether you’re a ‘Catholic for Choice,’ an ex-Catholic, other faith or no faith, recognize that six hardline Catholics have decided to overthrow Roe,” the group said. declared on Twitter. “Hold on to or at a local Catholic church on Sunday, May 8.”

Ruth sent us a video with the message, which showed activists dressed in Handmaid’s Tale costumes in a hallowed building, disrupting worshipers with cries of “Abortion on demand and no excuses!”

The same radical group earlier this week published places private homes of pro-life Supreme Court justices, calling on activists to come to their homes. “We must rise up to force accountability using a variety of tactics,” the group said.

A TikTok account of Ruth sent us downloaded a video of activists marching towards the doors of a Catholic church. “Sometimes a*****s need a beat,” the post said.

Ruth sent us on Twitter another video of demonstrators interrupting mass in another sacred building. The activists entered and stood between the holy altar and the parishioners. “For 2,000 years, the Catholic Church has been an institution for the enslavement of women,” one shouted.

“This is what Mother’s Day should look like,” Ruth Sent Us tweeted. “Catholic and Evangelical Churches Nationwide.”

CatholicVote communications director Joshua Mercer said Catholics across the country should be careful and prepared when attending Mass, especially next Sunday.

“In the past, we might have viewed the words of these activists as empty threats. But given the recent spate of very real attacks on Catholic statues and churches, it makes sense to be cautious,” Mercer said.

He added that Ruth Sent Us and other activists are quite explicit about their anti-Catholicism. “If they had wanted to, they could have focused only on the issue of abortion. But instead they chose to highlight the Catholic faith of some of the pro-life judges,” he said, noting that the radical abortion group called the judges “extremist Catholics.”

CatholicVote called on Catholics to pray for the judges whose addresses have been published. “We’re talking about human beings, with kids,” Mercer said. “And this Sunday, keep your eyes peeled. They are ruthless people, and they seek confrontation.

Below, readers can see the group of radical activists interrupting mass.

]]>
The far right in Europe: Vox continues to grow in Spain, but how far? https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-far-right-in-europe-vox-continues-to-grow-in-spain-but-how-far/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 14:49:10 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-far-right-in-europe-vox-continues-to-grow-in-spain-but-how-far/ Almost all of Spain’s political parties celebrated Emmanuel Macron’s victory in the French presidential elections over Marine Le Pen’s far-right National Front. Almost all except Vox, the Spanish formation to the right of the right who prefers to cling to Le Pen’s “historic” result. “The support of 45% of the French people is an extraordinary […]]]>

Almost all of Spain’s political parties celebrated Emmanuel Macron’s victory in the French presidential elections over Marine Le Pen’s far-right National Front. Almost all except Vox, the Spanish formation to the right of the right who prefers to cling to Le Pen’s “historic” result.

“The support of 45% of the French people is an extraordinary result for Marine Le Pen and it would be a serious mistake to ignore it,” said Jorge Buxadé, first vice-president of Vox Political Action and head of the party’s delegation on the social networks. . European Parliament.

He accompanied the post, posted on his networks at 11:41 p.m. Sunday, accompanied by a photo with candidate Le Pen on the night of his defeat in the second round against Macron.

In Spain, however, the extreme right of Vox just celebrated a small big victory: his beginnings in a regional government.


Demonstration in Madrid called by Vox against the central government. Photo: AP file

A few days ago the new government of the Junta de Castilla y León took office, the first Spanish autonomy with an executive made up of the People’s Party (PP) and Vox.

To Alfonso Fernández Mañueco, reelected regional president of the PP, there was no other form a government with a 31-year-old lawyer, Juan Garcia-Gallardounknown to Vox voters until party leader Santiago Abascal nominated him as candidate.

García-Gallardo is, since April 19, Vice President of Castilla y Leonwithout executive functions.

Not a bad game started in 2014 and who, in the last general election, became the third political force in Spain: has 52 deputies in Congress.

The president of Vox, Santiago Abascal.  Photo: EFE

The president of Vox, Santiago Abascal. Photo: EFE

“Vox was a stillborn party”, he however condemns to Bugle political scientist and professor Fernand Vallespin.

“In its early days, it was a split in the People’s Party that it barely reached 1% of the vote and that the same thing had to happen to La Phalange, which remained of Francoism, ”adds the political scientist.

The Catalan conflict, its fuel

And he continues: “These were parties that were outside the Spanish political system. But what gave him a lot of life was the Catalan conflict (and its attempt at independence from Spain in 2017). vox represents extreme Spanish nationalism and its initial success cannot be understood without the Catalan conflict.

“When the Socialist Party came to power with its parliamentary allies (in 2020), where the Catalan or Basque separatists were, and the coalition government with Podemos, there was a right-wing sector that he radicalized a lot against the Socialist Party”, specifies

“Voice there he started looking for his own land in which he practices culture wars. It attacks the radicalized feminism which they say exists in Spain, attack tolerance towards immigrationreinforce the discourse of the unity of Spain”, he lists.

In Castile and Leon the situation was difficult. The Socialist Party could have cooperated so that Vox did not enter the government with one abstention but didn’t want to do it. He proposed that if the PP stopped collaborating with Vox in other regional parliaments, he would help him. It was a poisoned offer,” says Vallespín, professor of political science at the Autonomous University of Madrid.

Just in case, the new president of the People’s Party and former president of Galicia, Alberto Nunez Feijoo, avoided attending the investiture of his party colleague Fernández Mañueco. He pleaded for an agenda brimming with commitments with social agents at the headquarters of the PP, Calle Génova in Madrid and He thus managed to avoid the photo with Santiago Abascal.

“Now the PP has leadership with an offer closer to Spanish society. He is rather reminiscent of the pragmatic PP of (Mariano) Rajoy, without having all the corruption scandals in his backpack. A PP that is renewed by a leader who has won four elections with an absolute majority in his native country, Galicia, and who offers him the hope of being able to beat the Socialist Party, of being the party with the most votes” , says Vallespin.

But a new concern is growing around Vox after the announcement by the Andalusian President, Juanma Moreno, of the PP, who has just set a date for the elections in her autonomy: June 19.

Necessary support

According to the latest polls, the Andalusian People’s Party will arrive in June in a better position than the PSOE. NeverthelessI need support from Vox obtain the parliamentary majority necessary to govern.

“Far-right parties generally live thanks to their condition as parties perceived as anti-system – Vallespín defines them -. This kind of moralization of politics where the voters of certain parties are singled out as plague victims, basically, benefits these matches. It’s about demonizing them to keep them from growing and the opposite happens.

And he says: “There is evidence that when these types of parties enter into governments, they tend to moderate and tend to lose votes. What gives them support is Ser los strangersthose who challenge the political spectrum or the dominant values ​​in the political system”.

And regarding the possible role that Vox could play in the next general elections, scheduled for next year, Vallespín maintains that “Feijóo, if he won the elections, he can never rule alone”.

“The majority of People’s Party voters He has no problem with an alliance with Vox. They see it as more serious that the Socialist Party agrees with Podemos or relies on parliamentary allies like Esquerra Republicana de Catalunya or Bildu, the representatives of the former ETA,” he says.

And he adds: “Because they see Vox as Misguided voters of the PP. This means, for Feijóo, that he is not going to lose many votes before the threat that he is going to agree with Vox. ”

According to Vallespin,there is no gesture on the part of the government to lend a hand to the PP so that it does not need the votes of Vox. On the other hand, the PP thinks that may end up taming Voxwho can incorporate it into government without incorporating its harshest proposals”.

In view of the next legislative elections, of the PP, however, they begin to lament aloud: “There will be no choice but to make a deal with Vox to go to La Moncloa.”

Madrid. Corresponding

ap

TOPICS THAT APPEAR IN THIS NOTE

]]>
“Guernica” and Ukraine: Picasso’s War Disasters https://faaeeantrapologia.com/guernica-and-ukraine-picassos-war-disasters/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 10:00:33 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/guernica-and-ukraine-picassos-war-disasters/ The current bombings of towns and villages in Ukraine are reminiscent of the savage attacks on civilians during the Spanish Civil War. In Picasso’s violent and powerful masterpiece, Guernica, a great artist responded to the cruel slaughter of the innocent. His portrayal of the bombardment of a small town, defenseless and of no military importance, […]]]>

The current bombings of towns and villages in Ukraine are reminiscent of the savage attacks on civilians during the Spanish Civil War. In Picasso’s violent and powerful masterpiece, Guernica, a great artist responded to the cruel slaughter of the innocent. His portrayal of the bombardment of a small town, defenseless and of no military importance, evokes the same shock and horror as the Russian bombs and atrocities committed against defenseless citizens during their invasion of Ukraine.

On April 27, 1937, during the Spanish Civil War, The Times reported the attack on Guernica, a town near Bilbao in northern Spain: “Guernica, the oldest town of the Basques and the center of their cultural tradition , was completely destroyed yesterday. afternoon by insurgent air raids. The bombardment of the open city far behind the battle lines occupied precisely three and a quarter hours, during which a powerful fleet of German planes ceaselessly unloaded on the city bombs and incendiary projectiles. All of Guernica was soon in flames. At the request of the Spanish fascists, 43 German planes killed 1,600 people, mostly women and children (the men had gone to war), and destroyed 70% of the city.

Picasso explained the principles of humanity that inspired his painting: “I have always believed and still believe that artists who live and work with spiritual values ​​cannot and must not remain indifferent to a conflict in which the most high values ​​of humanity and civilization are at stake. . . I clearly express my horror of the military caste which plunged Spain into an ocean of pain and death. Picasso completed the huge 25-by-11-foot fresco in a month of hard work. It was first exhibited in the Spanish pavilion at the Universal Exhibition in Paris, toured Europe to raise funds for the Republican cause, and was placed on extended loan at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. York. It is now at the Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid.

This complex image should be read, like a book, from left to right. The scene is painted entirely in black, white, and gray, and the victims are confined indoors and in darkness. There are six human figures with thick, twisted fingers and wide-open mouths, three of which are screaming. Picasso was passionate about bullfighting and this spectacle dominates painting. He said, “the bull is brutality and darkness, the horse represents the people.” In the center, facing the bull as if controlled by a picador in a bullfight, the horse with muzzle-nose, tombstone teeth, blade-like tongue, ragged mane and fluttering tail howls in agony. Padded but unprotected, the horse is pierced by a matador’s sword and gored with a bull’s horn. Head thrown back, the horse tramples the matador lying on the ground.

At top left, the triumphant bull stands motionless with blade-like ears, a white head, and a blazing white tail. Beneath the bull’s black body, a weeping woman with a drooping bare chest holds her dead baby and stretches her long neck which almost touches the massive bull’s chin. The bull is also dramatically opposed to the woman in the upper right. With flowing hair and a large ghostly white head, modeled after Picasso’s lover, Marie-Thérèse Walter, she slips through a narrow window, stretches out her long arm, and throws herself into the room. She holds a lighted oil lamp behind the horse’s head and under a glowing electric light bulb sun, which is shaped like an eye and pointed eyelashes that radiate like flames. Below her, a bare-breasted woman with a leaning head squats defensively with one leg stretched behind her. She rushes away from the fire consuming the woman in the upper right and heads towards the two high lights.

In the center foreground, a gaping-mouthed matador, lying on his back with severed arms outstretched, is trampled by the speared horse and mortally wounded. Reversing their traditional roles, he is defeated by the bull and holds a broken sword. On the far right, matching the woman with the baby, another woman tilts her head back, desperately throws up her arms and spreads her fingers. Trapped in a collapsing house in the flames that surge above and below her, she cannot escape through the small open window. The two distant lights contrast with the glow of the burning building.

In Picasso’s depiction of defenseless civilians destroyed by overwhelming force, the bull, horse, and matador symbolize bullfighting. The baby and the matador are dead; the horse will die; the grieving mother, the flaming woman and the crouching woman are doomed. As in Francisco Goya’s The Disasters of War, the cruelly tormented victims cry out for help that cannot come. The round-faced white woman, carrying the oil lamp, offers the only faint glimmer of hope. She illuminates the horrors, but cannot save the victims. As WH Auden wrote in “Spain”: “The story of the vanquished / Can say Alas but can neither help nor forgive.”

The Spanish Republicans or Loyalists lost the civil war, just as the Ukraine could lose this war. Spain was oppressed by the Fascist or Falangist regime from 1939 until the death of Francisco Franco in 1975. Picasso called his monumental work, seen from the point of view of the victims, “an instrument of war of attack and defense against the enemy”. It remains a noble depiction of victory in defeat, a human protest against the overwhelming forces of war and death. But his warning has once again been ignored, as Hitler returns in Putin’s guise to destroy Europe’s civilized values.

Jeffrey Meyers recently published Robert Lowell in Love and Resurrections: Authors, Heroes—and a Spy


A message from the article


We’re the only publication committed to covering all angles. We have an important contribution to make, needed more than ever, and we need your help to continue publishing throughout the pandemic. So please donate.

]]>
Revisiting the past | Colm Toibin https://faaeeantrapologia.com/revisiting-the-past-colm-toibin/ Sat, 09 Apr 2022 14:04:32 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/revisiting-the-past-colm-toibin/ This article is part of a regular series of conversations with the Reviewcontributors; read the previous ones here and sign up for our email newsletter to receive them weekly in your inbox. In our March 10, 2022 issue, Colm Tóibín reviewed Parallel mothers, Pedro Almodóvar’s latest film in which his characters confront the dark forces […]]]>

This article is part of a regular series of conversations with the Reviewcontributors; read the previous ones here and sign up for our email newsletter to receive them weekly in your inbox.


In our March 10, 2022 issue, Colm Tóibín reviewed Parallel mothers, Pedro Almodóvar’s latest film in which his characters confront the dark forces of their country’s past as they excavate the unmarked common graves of loved ones killed during the Spanish Civil War. Tóibín describes the filmmaker as “a moralist opposed to dishonesty and hypocrisy; his characters work to recognize aspects of themselves that were hidden or forbidden.

This surprising description could perhaps also apply to Tóibín, a prolific critic and novelist whose work candidly questions many of the themes that are also found in Almodóvar’s films: Catholicism, homosexuality and masculinity. . For two decades, Tóibín has regularly contributed to the Review. He is currently Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and Chancellor of the University of Liverpool.

After graduating from University College Dublin in 1975, Tóibín moved to Barcelona, ​​spending the next three years amid the fever of the new Spain emerging after the death of Francisco Franco. His experiences there influenced his first novel, South, which follows an Irish woman who emigrates to Barcelona. After his stay in Spain, Tóibín returned to Ireland in 1978 and began working as a journalist. He left his native country again in 1985 and traveled through Europe, South America and Africa, experiences that led him to produce Bad Blood: A walk along the Irish border and The Sign of the Cross: Travels in Catholic Europe.

As a critic, Tóibín has often considered works of Spanish art and literature that struggle against the forces and legacies of fascism; in addition to Almodóvar, he wrote about Javiar Marías, Pablo Picasso, and Federico García Lorca, who was assassinated by Falangist forces at the start of the Spanish Civil War.

Among the artists representing the anima of post-Franco Spain, he says, “a number of novelists emerged, but many of them were playful, as interested in form and tone as they were in politics. But, still, it is possible to get a portrait of modern Spain from Javier Marías, Almudena Grandes, Antonio Muñoz Molina and Enrique Vila-Matas. But the spirit of change also appears in the poems of Luis García Montero and in the paintings of Miquel Barceló.

In his review of Lorca’s volume Poet in SpainTóibín clarifies that artists are often burdened with politics, writing that “Lorca knew with almost whimsical certainty that in Spain in 1936 the personal was political, and that the body itself, especially the body of a woman or of a homosexual man, was as much the territory of conflict and fate as the ownership of land or factories.

While Tóibín recognizes that Parallel mothers “could seem to be Almodóvar’s most political film”, he stresses the importance of the director’s early work during Spain’s transition to democracy: “Moving sexual strangeness into the light of normality was for him a profoundly political act”.

Tóibín refers to motherhood as “one of Almodóvar’s great subjects”. The same could be said of Tóibín, who closely examined maternal dynamics in Will of Mary, house of namesand mothers and sons. I asked her if there was something that drew gay people to motherhood stories. “Yes,” he replied. “Gay people are kinder to their mothers than straight people, who, it seems, are often very busy.”

Right now he is reading Harald Jähner Consequences, a story of daily life in Germany in the decade following the fall of the Third Reich. “It gives us a fascinating account of what really happened in Germany in the lives of ordinary people after the war, but it also has a wider mission,” he said: “to show us how people behave weirdly and how the obvious things often don’t.” it doesn’t happen and how well people adapt to the oddest of circumstances.

Tóibín, although best known as a novelist, began writing poetry at the age of twelve. “It was an impulse rather than a decision,” he told me. “Poems and novels can both come from impulses. Often the impulse, the original one, is enough to sustain a poem, but a novel takes long days of boring work.

His first collection of poetry, Vinegar Hill, will be released on April 12, and is the culmination of decades of work: “If something comes to mind, I write it as the opening of a poem. From this I have completed two poems this year. Maybe by the end of the year I’ll have eight poems. When I’m not doing that, I’m working on a new novel. Perhaps, like Almodóvar’s characters, Tóibín revisits the past “to insist that what happened should not be forgotten”.

]]>
Starkie: scholar, musician, drifter https://faaeeantrapologia.com/starkie-scholar-musician-drifter/ Thu, 24 Mar 2022 16:26:56 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/starkie-scholar-musician-drifter/ Today, the Camino de Santiago, an increasingly popular pilgrimage to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia, Spain, not only attracts over 200,000 hikers a year, but is also enshrined on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Irish actor James Nesbitt starred in a film based on the pilgrimage called “The Way”. Although many people […]]]>

Today, the Camino de Santiago, an increasingly popular pilgrimage to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia, Spain, not only attracts over 200,000 hikers a year, but is also enshrined on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Irish actor James Nesbitt starred in a film based on the pilgrimage called “The Way”. Although many people mistakenly believed that the pilgrimage to Santiago had been going on uninterrupted since the Middle Ages, the trek did not experience a resurgence in popularity until the late 1950s, thanks in large part to the Irish scholar Walter Starkie, whose 1957 classic “The Road to Santiago” became the first modern popular work written in English on the pilgrimage, but he made many other important contributions to Spain and its culture.

Sign up for The Irish Echo newsletter

Sign up today to receive daily, up-to-date news and views on Irish America.

Although Starkie is now a forgotten figure in his native Ireland, Spain still remembers him for the many contributions he made as a teacher, translator of Spanish literature and as founder of the highly influential Institute British during World War II. He was, however, much more than an academic. A charming wanderer who was fluent in four languages, he was most proud of being called “the man who knows the gypsies”. Few men have been more successful in combining respectable academia with vagrant life. His popular travel books described his vacation away from academia, when he slung his violin over his shoulder and roamed the roads of Europe, living with the gypsies as one of them and paying his way with his violin.

It is perhaps hard to believe that this fiddle-playing wanderer, beloved of Europe’s Roma community, was in fact a scion of privileged Irish Protestant ancestry, albeit raised Catholic. Born in Ballybrack, Killiney, Co. Dublin, Starkie was the son of a famous Greek scholar and translator of Aristophanes, and the last resident Commissioner of National Education for Ireland under British rule. During his days at Trinity, Republicans accused him of being a “Western Briton”.

Starkie graduated in 1920, with first-class honors in classics, history, and political science. An accomplished violinist, he also won first prize in violin at the Royal Irish Academy of Music in 1913. Due to his severe asthma, he was rejected for service in World War I, but joined a band entertaining the forces in Italy, where he married an opera singer and complicated his legacy by supporting the early stages of Mussolini’s fascist regime.

He was a friend of William Butler Yeats, who asked him to serve on the advisory board of the Abbey Theatre. Starkie was often at odds with the other board members and failed to convince them to direct Sean O’Casey’s anti-war drama “The Silver Tassie”, which led O’Casey to abandon the abbey. He became a Fellow of Trinity College in 1926 and its first Spanish teacher in 1926. One of his students at Trinity was the Nobel Prize-winning playwright Samuel Beckett.

Starkie’s life would change with his first trip to Spain in 1924. He lectured at the Residencia de Estudiantes, where some of the giants of 20th-century Spanish culture studied, including the playwright and poet Federico Garcia Lorca, for whom he plays the violin, director Luis Buñuel and painter Salvador Dali. The Spaniards quickly fell in love with him as he appeared as a figure of a bygone era, in which the wandering scholar had a solid knowledge of languages, music and literature.

A great storyteller who loved his wine and his music, Starkie loved the Spanish fiestas the most where the music took center stage and people went into spontaneous flamenco. He charmed the Spaniards by going for his food at the tables of the cafes of Antequera or by walking around Madrid with his violin slung over his shoulder. He would shock some of his more staid Irish and British friends with the effusive greetings given to him by wild-looking gypsies who loved his music. Few people recognized him as a teacher. Once, appealing to the Basque painter Ignacio de Zuloaga, he looked so disheveled that the painter’s servant slammed the door. Starkie responded by sitting on the painter’s doorstep, pulling out his violin and playing the painter’s favorite Basque tune, to which the painter responded by opening the door, laughing and greeting him with a hug. bear.

Walter Starkie.

In the 1930s he wrote a few successful travel books, “Spanish Raggle-Taggle: Adventures with a Fiddle in Northern Spain” (1934) and “Don Gypsy: Adventures with a Fiddle in Barbary, Andulusia and La Mancha” ( 1936). Due to the many influences of his youth, Starkie donned very different personas in his travel diaries: sometimes Irish, sometimes English, sometimes just a wandering minstrel or fiddler. These works chronicle his interactions with all classes of people in Spain, something few other travel writers did at the time. He also spent a lot of time with Andalusian gypsy musicians, chronicling their music and listening to their stories. Writing allowed him to indulge his passion for travel and music; for example “Don Gypsy” is subtitled “Adventures with a Violin in Southern Spain”.

Walter Starkie’s lasting ties to Spain took root most firmly during the years 1940-54. Like many other Irish Catholics, Starkie was a supporter of Franco during the Civil War and because of his support for the Falangist movement, the dictator had no objection to his appointment in 1940 as British Council representative in Spain. Starkie founded the British Institute in Madrid and was also appointed British Cultural Attaché. The Institute thrived on Starkie’s stunning personality, in stark contrast to the haughty British Embassy staff, who did little to foster warm bonds with the Spanish people. His many Spanish admirers quickly acclaimed him as the most dynamic and productive Goodwill Ambassador to ever serve the Spanish and English speaking nations. On any night of Starkie’s tenure at the British Institute, one could encounter Madrid’s cultural elite, including Pio Baroja, future Nobel Prize-winning novelist Camilo Jose Cela, painters like Ignacio de Zuloaga and many others. He founded branches of the British Institute in Barcelona, ​​Bilbao, Valencia and Seville, taught comparative literature at the University of Madrid, and lectured at almost every other university in Spain.

Thanks in part to Starkie’s outsized influence, Spain remained neutral during the war. During the war he also helped set up and operate an escape route for British airmen shot down over France. Starkie and his wife also allowed their large apartment at 24 Calle del Prado to be used as a refuge for fleeing Jewish refugees.

Starkie helped popularize Spanish literature in the English-speaking world, publishing his translation of “Don Quixote”. He was fascinated by the image of the Andalusian pícaro, the hoodlum or chancellor who made his living by plotting.

In 1954, he reluctantly left for the United States where he taught at several universities, but he still kept a home in Madrid, where he planned to retire. He returned to Madrid in 1970 and lived there until his death in 1976. His body was taken back to Ireland and now rests in the family tomb in Dublin.

]]>
The Forgetting Pact – Kevin Cassar https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-forgetting-pact-kevin-cassar/ Mon, 21 Mar 2022 06:30:06 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-forgetting-pact-kevin-cassar/ Tista’ taqrah bil-Malti. “Let’s not disturb the graves and let’s not throw the bones at each other,” Jose Maria Aznar, the former Spanish prime minister, once said. Aznar’s Popular Party housed most of General Franco’s unreconstructed supporters. Franco, the brutal dictator of Spain had ruled the country with an iron fist for nearly four decades […]]]>

Tista’ taqrah bil-Malti.

“Let’s not disturb the graves and let’s not throw the bones at each other,” Jose Maria Aznar, the former Spanish prime minister, once said. Aznar’s Popular Party housed most of General Franco’s unreconstructed supporters. Franco, the brutal dictator of Spain had ruled the country with an iron fist for nearly four decades until 1975. Following his death came the ‘pacto del olvido’ – the pact of oblivion, the choice of Spain to forget the crimes of Franco.

The problem is that when we are forced to forget, we remember a lot. Robert Abela is campaigning to force the nation to forget. Abela does her best to erase the past. The Labor past carries the potent stench of corruption and the blood of a journalist. Abela himself has too much to hide.

“Now expect our friends in the opposition to talk more about the past, that’s what those who have nothing to offer for the future do,” Abela said on February 6. His words echoed those of Pablo Casada, the leader of the right-wing Spanish People‘s Party, an extension of Franco’s Falangists: “I would like to talk about the Spain of my children, not that of my grandparents”.

Both Abela and Casada have one goal: to bury the past before the past bury them.

Labor is trying to obliterate the past by slandering those who dare to remember it. “Bernard Grech is a representation of the past,” Abela announced March 1 at an event in B’Kara. “Grech wants to bring the country back to the time of Tonio Fenech”.

ONE chimed in, “Grech continues to use the face of the past”, “Grech speaks to the youth of the past”, “The PN of the past against everything and everyone”, “PN rooted in the past”, “PN continues to embrace extremist ideals the past “.

In 1977, Spain passed the Amnesty Law which swept aside the crimes of the Franco regime. This allowed Francoist politicians to gain full amnesty, stay in power, and remain in government. Spain has chosen not to condemn its former caudillo, the leader. After all, Franco had brought Spain immense prosperity. Besides Japan, Spain was the country with the strongest economic growth between 1959 and 1974 – the Spanish miracle.

In 2020, Malta’s own leader, he-Mexxej, was deposed after the brutal assassination of Daphne Caruana Galizia and revelations of her office’s close ties to the alleged go-between and mastermind. Like Franco, Muscat was a deeply divisive figure, adored and reviled. Like Franco, Muscat boasted of having brought prosperity to Malta, with economic growth exceeding that of most EU countries – the Maltese miracle.

And like Spain, Malta chose not to condemn its former leader. It was a clever way to allow Muscat’s own consultant, Robert Abela, to become the “prime minister of continuity”. He ensured that Muscat’s close allies won full amnesty, stayed in power, and remained in government.

Now Robert Abela is emulating the Spanish model of impunity with his own pact of forgetting. He wants to erase the memory. He threatens justice not to prosecute Muscat for his part in the scam of hospitals fearing what it will reveal. He threatened the Caruana Galizia investigation to close it to prevent the truth from being revealed.

He doesn’t want the nation to remember Rosianne Cutajar’s deals with Yorgen Fenech, Melvin Theuma’s ghostwork, Refalo’s VR looting, Lawrence Cutajar’s information to middleman, Zammit Lewis’ relationship with Yorgen Fenech .

He wants no one to remember Nexia BT, Brian Tonna, Karl Cini, Keith Schembri, Adrian Hillman, Pilatus Bank, Ram Tumuluri. He won’t let anyone report Konrad Mizzi.

He will not allow Joseph Muscat to participate in his campaign. He completely loses his rags when someone mentions his monthly salary of €17,000 from the Planning Authority. Or its direct orders with ARMS, Air Malta and the Ministry of the Environment. Or his ties to the Maksar brothers.

He frantically eludes the media fearing repeated questions about his stinky deal with a suspected money launderer, kidnapper and narcotics trafficker.

Pedro Almodovar’s award-winning documentary ‘The Silence of Others’ recalls the epic struggle of General Franco’s victims. It offers a cautionary lesson in the dangers of forgetting the past.

Malta must also learn this lesson. She must resist with all her energy Abela’s frantic attempts to bury the past. Seeking the truth is not treason. It is a responsibility, however painful and difficult, to serve justice.

Let’s not collaborate with Abela’s call for silence, the silence of injustice. When one digs up the history of his party, of the country and his own, it is not to look at the past. It is about fighting for the future.

Hiding a skeleton in the closet is hard enough. What chance is there of an entire nation with an exploding closet of stopping the skeletons from falling?

In 2007, three decades after Franco’s death, Spain woke up to its past. It passed the Historical Memory Law to investigate crimes committed under the Franco regime. He finally condemned Franco and his rule. After decades of repression, Spain was able to look at its past openly and honestly, able to prosecute and condemn those who abused their power to the detriment of the nation.

Decades of imposed silence have failed to extinguish the nation’s yearning for justice. In 2019, Franco’s body was finally exhumed and removed from the purposely built mausoleum in the Valley of the Fallen and buried in a family cemetery. Those who abuse power deserve neither shrines nor glorification.

Abela attempts to hold back the tide. By erasing the past, he draws attention to the impunity still enjoyed by his relatives and his Party. He cannot break with the corruption of Muscat. He is trapped there.

The real problem is that the current direction is a seamless continuation of the previous one. The more Abela tries to make us forget, the more we remember. The urgent duty of every honest citizen is to maintain this memory.

]]>
When General Franco helped Real Madrid destroy Barcelona https://faaeeantrapologia.com/when-general-franco-helped-real-madrid-destroy-barcelona/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/when-general-franco-helped-real-madrid-destroy-barcelona/ As Real Madrid and Barcelona prepare for El Clasico on Monday, we take a look at how General Franco made things a little easier for the Spanish giants. Real Madrid versus Barcelona is a rivalry that’s been around longer than our parents and even a few of our grandparents. The two teams share a rich […]]]>

As Real Madrid and Barcelona prepare for El Clasico on Monday, we take a look at how General Franco made things a little easier for the Spanish giants.

Real Madrid versus Barcelona is a rivalry that’s been around longer than our parents and even a few of our grandparents.

The two teams share a rich and historic rivalry, ranging from showcasing great football to controversy. It is a rivalry that is deeply rooted in politics.

However, today we are not going to go into every detail. Today the focus is on how a certain general France gave Real Madrid the lead. While all of Europe was burning after the outbreak of World War II, Spain had its own dictator in the person of General Francisco France.

Football matches that changed the world: Franco made sure Real Madrid scored ELEVEN goals for Barcelona - Irish Mirror Online

The general was a true despot and a man responsible for many of the anti-authoritarian feelings in Catalonia that still exist today. The Camp Nou was the only place where the Catalan language was spoken openly. Therefore, we can understand why Barcelona holds a special place in the hearts of locals.

On June 13, 1943, Real Madrid did something to Barcelona in the Copa del Generalisimo (yes before it was called Copa del Rey), which will forever be etched in the memory of Catalan fans.

The Blaugrana beat Real Madrid 3-0 in the first leg before traveling to the Estadio Chamartin, Madrid’s humble home before the Santiago Bernabeu. The Catalans were the favorites to reach the final but according to famous historian Joan Barau the second leg was no competition to begin with.

Real Madrid take political advantage

According to rumors and testimonies from several members of Barcelona’s squad and coaching staff, they were threatened by fascist police before kick-off. According to a legend, Spain’s Director of State Security threatened the players which practically drained them of all the confidence they had.

The game was General Franco’s way of showing the full extent of his powers to the Catalans.

Barau says: “In this tie, [at the Bernabeu]Barcelona were overwhelmed by military pressure and those close to the Falange (the National Fascist and National-Syndicalist political party), which greatly heated the atmosphere.

Real Madrid won the game 11-1. It was a game that is remembered as a match of shame and result that Los Blancos never really brag about because it’s a skeleton in the club’s cupboard that they’d rather never open.

]]>
Russia-Ukraine war: the discredit of the European right aligned with Putin https://faaeeantrapologia.com/russia-ukraine-war-the-discredit-of-the-european-right-aligned-with-putin/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 18:20:52 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/russia-ukraine-war-the-discredit-of-the-european-right-aligned-with-putin/ The war in Ukraine has challenged the support network Vladimir Putin has forged in Europe with far-right politicians for years. This is not surprising because Putin considers himself “conservative”, and partly critical of the Soviet era he lived in the last years of the USSR as a young officer of the KGB, the legendary secret […]]]>

The war in Ukraine has challenged the support network Vladimir Putin has forged in Europe with far-right politicians for years.

This is not surprising because Putin considers himself “conservative”, and partly critical of the Soviet era he lived in the last years of the USSR as a young officer of the KGB, the legendary secret service.

Moreover, from a declared atheist, he has already converted to power to the Orthodox Christian religion during a ceremony presided over by the Patriarch of All Russia, Kirill. His dream is to revive the Russian Empire.

The most important figure on the list is Italian Matteo Salvini, a member of the Rome government and leader of the right-wing League, who in 2018 won 34.6% in the European Parliament elections held in Italy .

From that peak, it has since fallen to the current 18%. Salvini was the right-wing candidate in next year’s Italian general election.

Salvini, in the crosshairs

The slippage he suffered following Putin’s warlike adventure hurt him so much that his own party discreetly asked him not to move and to speak as little as possible.


Salvini, uneasy, when they take out a T-shirt with Putin’s face. (AP)

Salvini was a member of the European Parliament and at the Strasbourg Palace he spoke openly in favor of Putin on several occasions. Once on television, he declared: “I am exchanging a Mattarella for Putin”, a boast directed against the President of the Republic, Sergio Mattarella, today the most respected and beloved figure of Italians.

Salvini’s pro-Putin proclamations abound. The aggression against Ukraine forced him to affirm that he was against the war without criticizing the Russian president and to go to the border with Poland, where a stream of refugees arrives every day.

“I came to help women and boys,” he told reporters. His visit included a meeting with the Polish mayor of Przemys, Woichec Bakum, who received him surrounded by journalists. A video broadcast hundreds of times in Italy showed that when Salvini arrived, the mayor unsheathed a white T-shirt bearing the image of Putin, who realized he had fallen into a trap .

It was the “maglietta” that he knew how to distribute to thousands of people and with which he walked around carrying it in 2017 in Moscow’s Red Square. The mayor did not invite him and Salvini withdrew amid cries of repudiation.

In France, the Putin affair fell like a bomb on the far right, which is divided in the first round of the presidential elections scheduled for April.

Marine Le Pen’s admiration for Putin

National Rally candidate Marine Le Pen, who shares a group with Salvini in the European Parliament, told Russian newspaper Kommersant in 2011 that she admired Putin.

Now he had to condemn the war in Ukraine. On February 24, when the invasion began, Le Pen called for the withdrawal of troops, saying the military operation “breaks the balance of peace in Europe”.

Marine Le Pen, loyal ally of Putin.  (AFP)

Marine Le Pen, loyal ally of Putin. (AFP)

Taking some distance does not make us forget that in 2017 Marine Le Pen was received by Putin when she was the face-to-face candidate of the far-right National Front, founded by her father.

Le Pen now denies his closeness to Putin. “I was one of the few politicians who always sought to maintain an equidistance between the United States and Russia. The newspaper “Liberation” reported that the Lepenists had to destroy a million electoral leaflets which depicted Le Pen with Putin.

Zemmour also bowed to Putin

Eric Zemmour, the other far-right candidate in the French presidential elections – where President Emmanuel Macron is increasingly favored – challenges Le Pen but last December predicted that Russia would never invade Ukraine, denouncing the “American propaganda”. This week he should have condemned the invasion in an act.

The pearl that the French press has discovered is that in 2018, Zemmour declared: “I feel like a French Poutine”. He comes out in favor of an alliance with Russia, which “would be the most reliable ally”.

Italian counter-terrorism services have detected that since 2014, when the war in Ukraine’s Donbass region began, more than sixty extremists have been fighting alongside small far-left groups in Italy for Russian claims. There are also right-wing groups that have taken up arms in support of Ukrainians.

The two main Italian neo-fascist groups are divided. Forza Nuova blames the United States and NATO, the Western alliance, for the conflict.

Pound House, named after the great American poet Ezra Pound, with fascist sympathies, is openly pro-Ukrainian “in defense of foreign imperialism”.

In Belgium, the extreme right of the Nation is on the side of Russia while the ultra-fascists of Bruges have taken the side of Ukraine. In Croatia, extremist groups of organized supporters have sided with Putin, while the ultra-nationalist far-right has sponsored enlistment in the neo-Nazi Ukrainian Azov Battalion, which is fighting in Mariupol.

In France, the Les Nationalistes party, led by Yvan Benedetti, justifies President Putin, while Bordeaux Nationaliste defends Ukraine.

The German Neo-Nazi Right

In Germany, the neo-Nazi alternative right defends Ukrainian President Zelensky with “a Europe that must free itself from Russian and American power”.

In Spain, the Democracia Nacional is mobilizing in favor of Ukraine, while another far-right movement, La Phalange, wonders if Putin is the only culprit.

In the Netherlands, far-right leader Geert Wilders and his Freedom Party vindicated Putin. Wilders himself visited the Russian Duma (Parliament) showing Russian and Dutch benderites.

In 2017, he repeated that “Putin is not an enemy” and denounced “hysterical Russophobia”. Russia “is on our side”. Now his enthusiasm has cooled.

Another very important character is missing. The ultra-conservative Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán, who in the European Union leads the four sovereignist countries, including Poland. A month ago, he flew to Moscow to meet Putin, an unwelcome gesture in the European Union.

When the Russians began the invasion on February 24, Orbán quickly changed his position: he endorsed European Union sanctions, backed Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, and traveled to Hungary’s border with Ukraine to welcome the fugitives. “We’ll get everyone in,” he promised.

A big change because Orbán was the sworn enemy of immigrants from Asia and Africa.

TOPICS THAT APPEAR IN THIS NOTE

]]>
Vox joins forces with Partido Popular https://faaeeantrapologia.com/vox-joins-forces-with-partido-popular/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 15:36:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/vox-joins-forces-with-partido-popular/ A far-right party will hold a share of power in Spain for the first time since the dictatorship of Francisco Franco, with the Voice party gaining a place in a coalition leading the regional government of Castile and Leon. Alonso Fernandez Mañueco, the new regional president of the conservative party People’s Party (PP), announced the […]]]>

A far-right party will hold a share of power in Spain for the first time since the dictatorship of Francisco Franco, with the Voice party gaining a place in a coalition leading the regional government of Castile and Leon.

Alonso Fernandez Mañueco, the new regional president of the conservative party People’s Party (PP), announced the agreement on Twitter just before the meeting of the new regional parliament for its first session. The PP won just over a third of the vote in an election in February, meaning it had to seek a coalition partner.

Fernandez Mañueco promised “a stable and strong government in full respect of the constitutional order” and the autonomous status of the region.

Vox regional chief Juan Garcia-Gallardo called the coalition deal “reasonable…with no winners or losers.” He added in a Twitter message, “Let us all work togetherwith a desire for dialogue and agreement, to achieve a legislature that benefits the citizens”.

Vox was launched in 2014 and is now the third largest party in the national parliament, reducing the PP’s share of votes. The PP is the country’s main opposition party and has traditionally alternated power with the currently ruling Socialists, but has seen its support eroded by corruption scandals.
Vox is campaigning to repeal a law banning Franco-era symbols and legislation inspired by feminism.

He also seeks to end Spain’s quasi-federal organization, in which regions independently administer key policies such as health and education, and wants to return Spain to the centralist form of government that existed at the time dictatorship.

Fernandez Mañueco’s words about respecting Castile and Leon’s autonomous status were apparently meant to fend off any attempts by VOX to dilute that.

Vox’s rise to regional governance is another win for the extreme right in Europe, which has expanded its support in France, Italy and Portugal. This could herald a further rise in support in Andalusia, Spain’s most populous region, which will hold elections in the coming months.

The last time the far right held power in Spain was during the 1937 merger of the fascist Falange with other traditionalist factions in a one-party system that lasted until Francisco’s death. Frank in 1975.

]]>
The far right obtains its first share of power in Spain since Franco https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-far-right-obtains-its-first-share-of-power-in-spain-since-franco/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-far-right-obtains-its-first-share-of-power-in-spain-since-franco/ MADRID, March 10 (Reuters) – A far-right party will hold a share of power in Spain for the first time since Francisco Franco’s dictatorship, with the Vox party securing a place in a coalition leading the regional government of Castile and Leon. Alonso Fernandez Mañueco, the new regional president of the conservative People’s Party (PP), […]]]>

MADRID, March 10 (Reuters) – A far-right party will hold a share of power in Spain for the first time since Francisco Franco’s dictatorship, with the Vox party securing a place in a coalition leading the regional government of Castile and Leon.

Alonso Fernandez Mañueco, the new regional president of the conservative People’s Party (PP), announced the deal on Twitter just before the new regional parliament convened for its first session. The PP won just over a third of the vote in an election in February, meaning it had to search for a coalition partner.

Fernandez Mañueco promised “a stable and solid government with full respect for the constitutional order” and the autonomous status of the region.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Vox regional chief Juan Garcia-Gallardo called the coalition deal “reasonable…with no winners or losers.” He added in a message on Twitter, “Let’s all work together, with a desire for dialogue and agreement, to achieve a legislature that benefits the citizens”.

Vox was launched in 2014 and is now the third largest party in the national parliament, reducing the PP’s vote share. The PP is the country’s main opposition party and has traditionally alternated power with the currently ruling Socialists, but has seen its support eroded by corruption scandals. Read more

Vox is campaigning to repeal a law banning Franco-era symbols and feminist-inspired legislation.

It also seeks to end Spain’s quasi-federal organization, in which regions independently administer key policies such as health and education, and wants to return Spain to the centralist form of government that existed during the dictatorship.

Fernandez Mañueco’s words about respecting Castile and Leon’s autonomous status were apparently meant to fend off any attempts by VOX to dilute that.

Vox’s rise to regional governance is another win for the far right in Europe, which has extended support to France, Italy and Portugal. This could herald a further rise in support in Andalusia, Spain’s most populous region, which will hold elections in the coming months.

The last time the far right held power in Spain was during the 1937 merger of the fascist Falange with other traditionalist factions in a one-party system that lasted until Francisco’s death. Frank in 1975.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Reporting by Belén Carreño Editing by Aislinn Laing and Frances Kerry

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

]]>