Spanish constitution – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 21:17:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png Spanish constitution – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ 32 32 God and Christ govern men for the good and prosperity of society https://faaeeantrapologia.com/god-and-christ-govern-men-for-the-good-and-prosperity-of-society/ Wed, 18 May 2022 18:40:37 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/god-and-christ-govern-men-for-the-good-and-prosperity-of-society/ Carry the importance of America and history consent Also, as discussed in my previous post, American Authority and Prosperity Rests on the Kingship of God, equal application to all citizens under the law – in our case, under God’s law – has a direct impact on business decisions and the financial success of companies. Stability […]]]>
United States Constitution

Carry the importance of America and history consent Also, as discussed in my previous post, American Authority and Prosperity Rests on the Kingship of God, equal application to all citizens under the law – in our case, under God’s law – has a direct impact on business decisions and the financial success of companies. Stability in law enforcement, in respect of property rights and in a country’s currency all create an environment conducive to business, investment and entrepreneurship. Here we will discuss enforcement under the law.

Roger McKinney explains that “unlike the laws of the surrounding nations which favored the rulers and the powerful, the laws of Israel applied to everyone equally. For the first time in history, all peoples were in equal relationship with the law, as Moses said: “You shall do no wrong in judgment; you shall not be partial to the poor nor deferential to the great, but you must judge your neighbor fairly” (Leviticus 19:15). The execution of the upright and just laws of the Sinai desert appeared as the foundation of the shining city. The declaration of the natural law of the United States would be, as it was with the ancient Hebrews, the manifestation of the law of God in its creation in their civil government. Other nations foolishly follow pagan beliefs, not this enlightened understanding of the Laws of God, and follow the whims of man, kings and tyrants. The government of Israel was in complete contrast to the government of Egypt and Pharaoh, and the government of the United States was in contrast to the king of England.

Even the ancient Hebrews had not reached this level of understanding and manifestation as America did. It was truly the Great Experience. “The analogy between theology and political philosophy is striking”, wrote Dr. Alice Baldwin in 1928, “God and Christ rule men for their good, therefore human rulers must do the same.” Joseph Belcher on May 28, 1701 in Boston preached “how Joshua, Moses, David, and Solomon had only the good of the people at heart,” as examples of righteous and godly rulers. Dr. Baldwin continued:

…certain great rights are given by Nature and the God of Nature to the people. These are part of every constitution and no ruler is authorized by God to violate them. Rulers cannot change the constitution; it can only be done by the people. But the constitution and the laws must conform to divine law. Therefore, leaders must carefully study the law of God, both natural and revealed.

It was a common observance and very frequently declared by colonial pastors to their constituents. And, of course, our founding fathers were parishioners in those congregations. Pastor Chauncy confessed:

And by encouraging, on the other hand, industry, frugality, temperance, chastity, and similar moral virtues, the general practice of which is naturally linked to the development of a people in all that tends to make you big and happy.

On May 14, 1778, Reverend Chauncey Whittelsey preached a sermon to the Connecticut State General Assembly, declaring God’s sovereignty over civil government and those serving in it. He began by declaring 2 Samuel (2 Samuel 23:3-4), “He who rules over men should be righteous, ruling in the fear of God.” Whittelsey quotes the book of Job, stating that “‘The fear of the Lord is wisdom, and to shun evil is to understand [Job 28:28].’ Thus, God being Judge, who cannot err, religion or the fear of the Lord is the true wisdom of man. Whittelsey states that it is the “duty” of every “civil magistrate”.[s].”

Dr. Baldwin further summarizes the teachings of the colonial ministers: “The restriction imposed on Christians by Christ is for the very purpose of increasing their freedom, and so it is in civil government. Without law and without obedience to law, there would be no freedom…Neither tyranny nor anarchy pleases God. It is about how the Law and Will of God manifests in His creation for the governance of His citizens. Colonial clergy understood this commission and worked to articulate it, and the understanding of the Basic Law, to American colonists. This supremacy of the kingship of God was noted in 1599 when the Jesuit high priest and Spanish scholar Juan de Mariana wrote, “Armed with the laws and authority of the people, he would maintain royal power within certain limits…that the authority of the people is greater. that the authority of [any earthly] King.” Freedom comes from the people, as the people of God, and not from an earthly authority or government.

As people serve as agents of God and in the service of his children, he expected them to serve by obeying him. In other words, as Pastor Chauncy preached, men are to “reign in the fear of God.” Chauncy declared in 1747 that civil rulers should “promote the general welfare and prosperity of a people, by discouraging, on the one hand, idleness, prodigality, profanation, impurity, drunkenness and similar immoralities, which tend, in the natural course of things, to their impoverishment and ruin.

The American covenant, or covenant, serves the same way as the covenant God made between Moses and the children of Israel; as they were, so are we, children of God. “So take care to put into practice the words of this covenant, that you may succeed in all that you do. You all stand today before the Lord your God; the chiefs of your tribes, your elders and your officers.

America’s adherence to equality before the law has deep historical roots and provides a stable environment, when properly enforced, for businesses to thrive and grow.

Jim Huntzinger is the President and Founder of Lean Frontiers, Inc., which develops Lean enterprise knowledge and learning communities for business and industry. With a background and experience in manufacturing and operations, he has also done extensive research on the history and development of American manufacturing and has also published several books on the lean business model, the history of manufacturing and the economy.

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Red-tagging publishers and bookstores | The Manila Times https://faaeeantrapologia.com/red-tagging-publishers-and-bookstores-the-manila-times/ Mon, 16 May 2022 14:57:56 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/red-tagging-publishers-and-bookstores-the-manila-times/ The Manila Critics Circle, which has chosen winners for the annual National Book Awards since 1991, denounced the red labeling of Adarna Books, which has published children’s books for more than 40 years. “The Manila Circle of Critics condemns the red branding of respected publisher Adarna House by the National Intelligence Coordination Agency (NICA) and […]]]>

The Manila Critics Circle, which has chosen winners for the annual National Book Awards since 1991, denounced the red labeling of Adarna Books, which has published children’s books for more than 40 years.

“The Manila Circle of Critics condemns the red branding of respected publisher Adarna House by the National Intelligence Coordination Agency (NICA) and the National Task Force to End the Local Communist Armed Conflict (NTF-Elcac). Not only is Adarna House an award-winning publisher known for producing only quality material, they are also a publisher dedicated to the truth. It is a disservice to our young readers to assume that they should be excused from learning about significant events in Philippine history like the imposition of martial law.

“The truth does not ‘sow hatred and lies in the tender hearts of our children’ (as Lorraine Badoy, spokesperson for NTF-Elcac put it). The truth does not ‘subtly radicalize’ (as the said Alex Paul Monteagudo, Executive Director of NICA). Monteagudo claimed that the portrayal of martial law in children’s books sows dissent and hatred in their minds. But martial law is part of our history, so are his victims. Like all true things, this is something readers should learn from the books and make up their own minds.

“Adarna House is an innovative, private, educational publisher that should be encouraged to continue publishing…and commended for its dedication to telling the story of the Philippines to young children.”

The red marking of Adarna Books follows the Popular Bookstore and Solidaridad Bookshop vandalism more than a month ago. Curiously, Adarna Books is owned by National Artist Virgilio Almario and his family, while Solidaridad Bookstore was founded by the late National Artist, Frankie Sionil Jose.

Each of the bookstores had their fronts defaced with graffiti in red paint, accusing them of being an “NPA front” (New People’s Army). The red marking of Adarna Books as well as Popular and Solidaridad bookstores goes against the right to freedom of speech and expression enshrined in our Constitution. Publishers and booksellers here don’t make any money, yet they persist in doing business because they are cultural industries. Their books help people think for themselves. This graffiti vandalism and red marking also threatens store owners, employees and customers, and must be stopped. Plus, we should all be working to improve our children’s dismal reading rates instead of pestering publishers and bookstores.

The late Fr. Joseph A. Galdon of the Society of Jesus was a professor and chairman of the much-vaunted English department at Ateneo de Manila University.

At a teaching seminar, he said that after martial law was imposed in 1972, military personnel descended on the English department. They said they were “looking for books that would destroy the country!” They weren’t armed with a search warrant, but since it was martial law, Father Galdon said they could look around if they wanted.

The soldiers checked the departmental library. One of the officers then held up a book and said, “Now this is a communist book. It is against the government. He was holding a copy of Father John Schumacher’s book, The Propaganda Movement. Father Galdon simply told them that the book was about the propaganda movement that began in 1872 against Spanish rule in the Philippines.

Another officer found a small book with an orange cover. It was Neil Postman’s teaching as a subversive activity. The officer said it was a subversive book just by the title. Father Galdon told the officer that the book “dealt with pedagogy or the art of teaching”.

When the officer looked lost, the good Jesuit said Postman’s book, published in 1969, was against “outdated teaching methods – with dramatic and practical proposals for how education can be made relevant in the world of today”. In sum, the book says that the student must be at the heart of the teaching and learning experience.

There are many sensible officers and soldiers in our armed forces. We are sure they would be upset if these incidents were to repeat themselves now that the mantra for the day is ‘unity’.

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Children take center stage at local Norwegian National Day celebrations https://faaeeantrapologia.com/children-take-center-stage-at-local-norwegian-national-day-celebrations/ Fri, 13 May 2022 10:01:05 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/children-take-center-stage-at-local-norwegian-national-day-celebrations/ The Norwegian School of Benalmádena. / ON The Norwegian community on the Costa del Sol will celebrate Constitution Day on May 17, also known as Children’s Day Norwegians celebrate their Constitution Day on May 17, also known as Children’s Day. This year, in addition to the traditional children’s parade in Benalmádena, an art competition is […]]]>

The Norwegian School of Benalmádena. / ON

The Norwegian community on the Costa del Sol will celebrate Constitution Day on May 17, also known as Children’s Day

Norwegians celebrate their Constitution Day on May 17, also known as Children’s Day. This year, in addition to the traditional children’s parade in Benalmádena, an art competition is dedicated to a historical Norwegian personality who lived in Andalusia.

In Norway, on Constitution Day, virtually every elementary school district holds its own parade, led by marching bands. One of their goals is to highlight the role of children in Norwegian society. The largest of the traditional parades takes place in Norway’s capital where tens of thousands of people gather and march, waving flags and shouting “hurrah!”

The children’s parade on May 17 has also become a tradition on the Costa del Sol. In Benalmádena, students from the Norwegian School (Den Norske Skolen), accompanied by a guest Spanish brass band, take to the streets. The parade begins in the center of Arroyo de la Miel at the Inmaculada Church at 10:45 a.m. Everyone sings the Norwegian national anthem, as well as other traditional songs. At 11:15 a.m., in front of the Casa de Cultura, speeches will be given by Mayor Víctor Navas and Director Trude Jahren.

This year, more than 100 Norwegian students and teachers will take part in National Day celebrations in Benalmádena.

Some of them will show off their ‘bunad’, Norway’s traditional costume. At 12:30 p.m., the events move to the school for games and other activities.

Traditionally, a class from a local Spanish school in Benalmádena Pueblo has been invited to join in the activities. This time, the school’s new outdoor canteen will offer typical waffles, hot dogs and ice cream.

painting in nature

In the rural complex Los Caracoles (The snails), in the region of Frigiliana, Torrox and Nerja, hot dogs are also prepared, but Andalusian style, and ice cream. The population of Norwegians and other Scandinavians is growing rapidly on the eastern side of the Costa del Sol.

On May 17, the resort will welcome all Norwegians who want to spend the day surrounded by nature, with Andalusian cuisine, including smoked salmon toast.

The organizers are sure that the peaceful environment, exotic fruit trees and an abundance of different flowers, as well as the unique snail-shaped buildings will attract both Norwegian children and adults. In addition, the “day” of Norway will last a few weeks in Los Caracoles thanks to an art competition for children.

Preparations for the Norwegian day at Los Caracoles. /

ON

From May 17 to May 31, a creative corner of the rural complex will be a space for painting and drawing. The subject of the art contest is “My image of the Princess of Norway”. The activity aims to raise awareness of Christine, Princess of Norway, the daughter of Håkon IV, King of Norway, who in the 13th century came to live in Spain. It is believed that she enjoyed Andalusia and died young here in 1262.

Until the end of the month, all photos with their imaginative portraits will be exhibited and then evaluated by a jury.

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Student Senate – The Spectator https://faaeeantrapologia.com/student-senate-the-spectator/ Wed, 11 May 2022 14:13:40 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/student-senate-the-spectator/ The last Student Senate meeting of the academic year began Monday at 6:02 p.m. During the open forum, Senator Brad Heap spoke about the party registry system he is working on with the Eau Claire Police Department to encourage safer parties with less noise citations and drinking citations. alcohol among minors. Senator Thomas Miller reintroduced […]]]>

The last Student Senate meeting of the academic year began Monday at 6:02 p.m.

During the open forum, Senator Brad Heap spoke about the party registry system he is working on with the Eau Claire Police Department to encourage safer parties with less noise citations and drinking citations. alcohol among minors.

Senator Thomas Miller reintroduced the bill 65-B-1 for revise the rules of procedure of the 66th session. The bill passed 17-0-2.

“I’m glad it finally happened,” Miller said. “We can now operate with a working document.”

Vice President Nick Johnson withdrew the bill 66-B-2 to establish support for and membership in the University of Wisconsin System Student Governance Association (UWSSGA).

The bill was withdrawn because the UW system wants to make changes to the UWSSGA constitution, according to Nick Johnson.

The senate has begun the process of appointing a new board of directors. The candidates make a five-minute presentation, answer questions for five minutes, and then the Senate meets in closed session to deliberate on the nomination of the candidates.

Miller, a freshman in political science, was named a Senate parliamentarian. Miller served as a senator during the 65th session and participated in the bylaws amendment process.

Anakah Denison, a third-year environmental biology major in ecology, has been named director of staff for the Senate. Denison was a senator during the 65th session.

Sahana Suresh, a third-year student in human resource management and information systems, was appointed as the commissioned director of academic affairs, but was not named. Suresh held a senator’s seat in the 65th session and will continue as a senator in the 66th session.

“I feel bad for the candidate who was not elected to the Senate,” Nick Johnson said. “We were very excited about this candidate, but there’s always a chance it could happen.”

Ivan San, a second-year biology student and pre-healthcare professional, was named director of the communications committee. San was a senator during the 65th session.

Ben Johnson, a second-year finance student, was named chair of the finance committee. Ben Johnson was involved in the finance committee during the 65th session.

Maddie Blong, a freshman majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology, has been named the Senate chair of the Committee on Equity in Student Affairs. Blong is a member of the Inter-Tribal Student Council and works for multicultural student services on campus.

During the deliberation process, the Senate meeting was halted due to a tornado warning and temporarily moved until the weather improves.

The meeting continued with the appointment of Hannah Kelly, a second-year political science student and student from Spain, to chair the Intergovernmental Affairs Committee. Kelly served as a senator and intern for intergovernmental affairs during the 65th session.

Sydney McGuine, a sophomore in environmental public health, has been named Senate Director of the Sustainability Committee’s Student Office. McGuine was a senator and a member of the SOS commission during the 65th session.

Heap, a freshman majoring in health care administration and psychology, was named director of the student organizations commission. Heap served as a senator and member of the Student Organizations Committee during the 65th session.

Sophomore public relations and communications student Brett Farmer has been reappointed as director of the University Activities Committee. Farmer was the committee’s public relations chairman during the 64th session and director during the 65th session.

The members of the executive council have resigned their seats as senators but will retain the right to vote.

Chairman Rossellin Gaitan said the Senate will make the final two appointments to the board of trustees, the academic affairs committee and the information technology committee, at an emergency meeting next week.

“Almost everyone we had set up to be considered passed, which is phenomenal,” Gaitan said. “I’m delighted that we have a great team that was chosen not only by us, but also by our committee.”

The sitting adjourned at 10:35 p.m. and the Senate will reconvene for an emergency meeting at 6:00 p.m. on Monday, May 16.

Kasper can be reached at [email protected]

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Flowers and Democracies | Opinion of the applicant https://faaeeantrapologia.com/flowers-and-democracies-opinion-of-the-applicant/ Mon, 09 May 2022 20:15:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/flowers-and-democracies-opinion-of-the-applicant/ Under the post-war Republic of the Philippines and under martial law, the Philippines held elections each November, with the new president sworn in the following January. It was a practice that we borrowed, basically, from Mother America. With a new post-Edsa Constitution, the elections were postponed to May, which was good because they coincided with […]]]>

Under the post-war Republic of the Philippines and under martial law, the Philippines held elections each November, with the new president sworn in the following January. It was a practice that we borrowed, basically, from Mother America.

With a new post-Edsa Constitution, the elections were postponed to May, which was good because they coincided with the summer holidays, allowing teachers to help with administrative work, prospecting and transmission of results, difficult, even perilous work. given the political cretins and guns that have accompanied the gold (corruption) and glitter (celebrities) of our elections.

The Spanish brethren had, centuries earlier, discovered the month of May for another purpose: feasts or religious feasts, a time to honor the patrons of the city with song and dance, a time for religious instruction, though quite often there was a swerve of religious themes in the band, much to the chagrin of the moral guardians.

But who could blame people seeking freedom from the harsh penitential Lenten practices of fasting and abstinence and motley prohibitions? Nature has also lent us a helping hand, as we have found our landscapes splashed with the colors of the Flores de Mayo, the Mayflowers we have appropriated for festivals, the flowers adorning religious statues, buildings, costumes, people.

May couldn’t be happier than it was, than it is in the Philippines, and the year’s elections, especially the national elections, provided additional treats, more than festivities, more entertainment… and more passion, often boiling over into violence.

This year’s national elections will be remembered as a colorful and often chaotic combination of the religious and the political. With political parties in disarray, it was unclear what an “opposition” would look like, which could have been a blessing, when people realized that our democracy was under siege, that it was time not only to exercising the civic duty to vote, but asking people to question old values ​​and produce new visions, new aspirations.

We questioned ourselves and never in our history have we seen such an outpouring of political opinions, expressed so creatively with a profession of commitment to these new visions, values ​​and ideals.

This summer of 2022, we were a people who were coming of age, no longer just to seek, but to find our identity, to understand who we were. For years to come, this summer of 2022 will be remembered by strangers in gatherings to build friendships, which would begin with offers to share food, an umbrella…and stories of families, children, and dreams.

We were finally understanding kapwa as finding ourselves in others, and the power of this pakikipagkapwa.

Nilda, a nurse friend and elderly person, texted about a ‘miracle’ to share her bottle of Padre Pio oil she always carried with a stranger she had met at the rally who found relief from a throbbing headache after using it.

I smiled and texted: the miracle was faith you had, Nilda, and your friend’s too, in an even more miraculous gathering of faith in the land.

It will take a few days before knowing the results of the elections. If indeed we will have President Leni and Vice President Kiko, there will be jubilation, although we recognize that the hard work has only just begun, to build new foundations, so that we will never have to go through what we have just been doing for the past few weeks, democracy on the brink.

If we end up with a different leadership, there will be sorrow but hopefully not despair. The work will be all the more difficult, but we must continue with what has started, to ensure that the fragile democracy that we have will not be further dismantled. We need all the more to be inflamed by the courage and the faith gathered in recent weeks.

Elections, in November or May, have taught us that democracies are very much like flowers, only blossoming with the right combination of circumstances and care. We take them for granted in good years, only wanting them when we realize they aren’t doing as well, or maybe they haven’t even appeared.

We thank Leni and Kiko and their team for this summer of 2022 where the flowers bloomed, furiously, and not just in pink. May our children and their children live in a time of ever-thriving democracies.

[email protected]

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Minister McKenzie wants child killers hanged https://faaeeantrapologia.com/minister-mckenzie-wants-child-killers-hanged/ Sat, 07 May 2022 21:13:53 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/minister-mckenzie-wants-child-killers-hanged/ Local Government and Rural Development Minister Desmond McKenzie is calling for justice in the form of hangings to be served for criminals who murder Jamaican children. In an interview Sunday at the annual Wrath Laying Ceremony at the Secret Garden Monument in downtown Kingston which contains the names of murdered children, McKenzie said the sentence […]]]>

Local Government and Rural Development Minister Desmond McKenzie is calling for justice in the form of hangings to be served for criminals who murder Jamaican children.

In an interview Sunday at the annual Wrath Laying Ceremony at the Secret Garden Monument in downtown Kingston which contains the names of murdered children, McKenzie said the sentence currently being imposed on the perpetrators was not adequate. .

“Those who are killed in a confrontation where a shooter would walk into a house and shoot an innocent child, there is no excuse. I don’t know how many police actions or how many laws we can put on the books, but as far as I am concerned, crimes against children should be treated differently and those who murder children should be sentenced to the death penalty.

“There are people who say it’s a step backwards to talk about hanging, but the price these criminals are paying and neglectful parents for brutal child abuse, we don’t see anyone paying the price they should pay and as a country we need to take stock and say ‘let’s do justice to the young people,'” McKenzie said.

Capital punishment, which in Jamaica is suspended, remains on the law books, even though the act has not been committed on the island since 1988, when Nathan Allen, who was convicted of murder, was killed on the gallows of Spanish Town Jail in St Catherine. , where it was done.

A moratorium was imposed on hanging after Allen’s death and it lasted until 2009, with Jamaica’s last court of appeal, the Privy Council, ruling in 2003 that a period of more than five years delay in carrying out a death sentence constituted cruel and inhuman punishment. , which violated the Jamaican constitution.

McKenzie, however, believes a serious approach must be taken to protect the lives of children on the island, with hundreds murdered in recent years by thugs, with the Secret Garden Monument, which was built in 2008 now out of space to contain the names of those killed. The monument was built during Mckenzie’s tenure as mayor of Kingston.

“We can no longer continue, conveniently, to talk about the atrocities that are inflicted on young people across the country and we are not comfortable that every year we come here to commemorate the unfortunate disappearance of young people, whose contribution to Jamaica can never be measured because we don’t know what they might have brought.

“They say it takes a village to raise a child, but I want to extend that, not just to a village, but to a country, where we all have to be parents for those who need it and even for those who have parents, because too much teaching does not do too much.

What we need is a country that is more responsive, more understanding and more grateful for children, but it has to start at home first,” McKenzie said.

He said a new monument will be built to hold the names of the children who are killed.

Meanwhile, Kingston Mayor Delroy Williams agrees that the child murders should be hanged.

“The issue of murder is a major social issue. The issue of child murder and violence against children is a very serious issue and I think I would agree with Minister McKenzie, in terms of looking seriously at the issue, in terms of the legal framework said Williams when asked.

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The Absolute Best Mediterranean Restaurants in the United States https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-absolute-best-mediterranean-restaurants-in-the-united-states/ Sun, 01 May 2022 06:04:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-absolute-best-mediterranean-restaurants-in-the-united-states/ Chef Enrique Limardo is the originator of Imperfecto’s fusion concept. The menu changes daily with an ongoing commitment to exploring the interplay between Mediterranean and Latin American cuisines. The white and blue hues are reminiscent of Greece and may recall notions tied to Artistolean perfectionism, a concept that Limardo rejects, opting instead for a world […]]]>

Chef Enrique Limardo is the originator of Imperfecto’s fusion concept. The menu changes daily with an ongoing commitment to exploring the interplay between Mediterranean and Latin American cuisines. The white and blue hues are reminiscent of Greece and may recall notions tied to Artistolean perfectionism, a concept that Limardo rejects, opting instead for a world that only evolves by being “imperfect”.

Light and airy, the dining room uses height and bold curves to create architectural intrigue, mimicking the feel of a whitewashed Greek town. As for the cocktail menu, the Perfectly Imperfect cocktail combines Belvedere vodka, Limoncello, yuzu juice, fresh pineapple and vanilla syrup in a coupe glass. La Noche Caliente combines jalapeño reposado tequila, Alessio vermouth, biscotti liqueur and mirto rosso.

According to Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema, Moussaka cigars with smoked eggplant and goat cheese-manchego cream are incredible. Sietsema also praises foie gras with crisp plantain brioche, soursop compote, parmesan and truffle.

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We will block Sweden and Finland from joining NATO, says Croatia https://faaeeantrapologia.com/we-will-block-sweden-and-finland-from-joining-nato-says-croatia/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 17:40:19 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/we-will-block-sweden-and-finland-from-joining-nato-says-croatia/ We will block Sweden and Finland from joining NATO, says Croatia Source: Damir Sencar/HINA/POOL/PIXSELL/Social Democratic Party of Croatia The announcement of Croatian President Zoran Milanovic on Tuesday, April 26and may surprise some, but he says “we will block Sweden and Finland from joining” because their candidacies will provoke Russia. Croatia, which has yet to ratify […]]]>

We will block Sweden and Finland from joining NATO, says Croatia Source: Damir Sencar/HINA/POOL/PIXSELL/Social Democratic Party of Croatia

The announcement of Croatian President Zoran Milanovic on Tuesday, April 26and may surprise some, but he says “we will block Sweden and Finland from joining” because their candidacies will provoke Russia.

Croatia, which has yet to ratify its NATO membership, believes that any application for membership from Scandinavian states will do little more than provoke Russian President Vladimir Putin. Croatia has its own problems as it tries to get Bosnia and Herzegovina to update its electoral law.

Milanovic told reporters in Zagreb that: “As far as I’m concerned, they can get into NATO, they can poke the rabid bear in the eye with a pen.

“However, until the question of the electoral law in Bosnia and Herzegovina is resolved, until the Americans, the English, the Germans, if they can and want to, force Sarajevo and Bakir Izetbegovic to update the electoral law within the next six months and grant Croats their basic rights, the Sabor must not ratify anyone’s admission to NATO”.

NATO cannot admit new members without the approval of current members.

“Let the President or the Secretary of State hear this now. Let’s see what they can do for Croatia. I’m tired of ignoring and neglecting a member of NATO and the EU, and sidelining Croatia,” adding that if the United States and its Western European allies want both Scandinavian countries in NATO, “they will have to listen to Croatia”.

Croatia’s grievance is that under the 1995 constitution that ended the civil war, ethnic Croats in neighboring Bosnia and Herzegovina are recognized as equals. But the country wants this group to be able to elect its own representatives and not as is the case now, where representatives are elected by the wider community, the majority of which are Bosnian Muslims, also known as Bosniaks.

Milanovic has many other gripes, including the EU’s refusal to admit Romania and Bulgaria to the Schengen border crossing arrangement, the lack of recognition of Kosovo which broke away from Serbia and the lack progress in talks with Albania and North Macedonia. The latter having changed their name to overcome the Greek objections.

He said, “We’re not asking Finland or Sweden to change their name to Ikea, just telling the Americans that these issues need to be addressed.”

Both countries remained neutral for many years but the invasion of Ukraine and threats from Russia made them think again.

Croatia was accepted as a NATO member in 2009 and the country joined the EU in 2013 when Milanovic was prime minister. What is unclear, however, is whether he will be able to see his threat to block Sweden’s and Finland’s NATO membership, as the nationalist opposition HDZ party has a parliamentary majority.


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Confederate Railroad arrives at Henderson for POW Memorial Benefit https://faaeeantrapologia.com/confederate-railroad-arrives-at-henderson-for-pow-memorial-benefit/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 19:35:55 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/confederate-railroad-arrives-at-henderson-for-pow-memorial-benefit/ One of country music’s most popular bands will travel to western Kentucky this summer to honor those who stood up for our country and never returned home. Confederate Railroad will play a benefit show in Henderson The Atlanta, GA natives, Confederate Railroad head to the Henderson County Fairgrounds on Friday, June 24 (2022) for the […]]]>

One of country music’s most popular bands will travel to western Kentucky this summer to honor those who stood up for our country and never returned home.

Confederate Railroad will play a benefit show in Henderson

The Atlanta, GA natives, Confederate Railroad head to the Henderson County Fairgrounds on Friday, June 24 (2022) for the “Rocking for Heroes” show to raise money for a POW memorial project which will be built on the exhibition grounds.

Rodney Bond with Hosp Veterans Outreach, Inc., is not only the man putting on the show, but the man leading the construction of the memorial. I recently spoke with Rodney on the phone and he told me that the memorial will feature the names of all known POWs, which no other memorial in the country does. Based on the artist’s rendering below, the granite memorial will feature three walls, with three sections each listing the names of those missing in action on the front and back, complete with the official POW/MIA logo as the centerpiece of the middle wall. . The memorial will also feature built-in benches for visitors to sit on as they pay their respects to those held captive by foreign countries as well as those who went into battle but never returned and are presumed borne disappeared.

henderson ky pow memorial

Hosp-KY Veterans Outreach, Inc.

In addition to headliners, Confederate Railroad, the show is also expected to feature a number of local artists who will take to the stage throughout the day. I imagine once they hit the stage, we’ll have all of our Confederate Railroad favorites, including the lead single from their self-titled debut album, “She Took It Like a Man.”

Doors to the show open at noon and Confederate Railroad is scheduled to take the stage at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are on sale now for $20 in advance. That price jumps to $30 at the door the day of the show. Advanced tickets can be purchased at the All Peddler Flea Market behind Audubon Chrysler in Henderson and online through the Hosp. KY Veterans Awareness website.

Hosp-KY Veterans Outreach, Inc.

Hosp-KY Veterans Outreach, Inc.

[Source: Hosp-KY Veterans Outreach, Inc.]

WATCH: 100 years of American military history

WATCH: What 25 historic battlefields look like today

What follows is an examination of what happened to the sites where America fought its most important and often brutal war campaigns. Using a variety of sources, Stacker selected 25 historically significant battlefields in American history. For each, Stacker investigated what happened there when the battles raged as well as what happened to those sacred lands when the fighting ceased.

It was the battlefields that defined the course of the American military, from colonial rebels to an invincible global war machine.

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An avid Naperville hobbyist knows the ropes of ship modeling https://faaeeantrapologia.com/an-avid-naperville-hobbyist-knows-the-ropes-of-ship-modeling/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 22:05:57 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/an-avid-naperville-hobbyist-knows-the-ropes-of-ship-modeling/ Passion pours into every model ship that 85-year-old Greg Zimmerman builds in the carpentry shop at Monarch Landing seniors’ community in Naperville. But painstakingly crafting a dozen intricate wooden ship miniatures isn’t Zimmerman’s primary calling. “When I was in sixth grade, I wanted to be a missionary,” says Zimmerman, who grew up in a family […]]]>

Passion pours into every model ship that 85-year-old Greg Zimmerman builds in the carpentry shop at Monarch Landing seniors’ community in Naperville. But painstakingly crafting a dozen intricate wooden ship miniatures isn’t Zimmerman’s primary calling.

“When I was in sixth grade, I wanted to be a missionary,” says Zimmerman, who grew up in a family of 11 in St. Viator Parish in Chicago’s Old Irving Park neighborhood. At 14, he began studying at the Saint-Jude Seminary in Momence. He earned a degree in philosophy before earning his degree in theology from the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. Ordained a priest in 1963, Zimmerman, who learned Spanish, spent five years as a missionary in Guatemala although he nearly died of hepatitis.

‘I’m one of the few Catholics to have received all seven sacraments,’ says Zimmerman, who was baptized, confessed, communicated, confirmed, ordained, received so-called last rites when ill, and married in 1974. He resigned from the priesthood in 1973 when he felt the progressive momentum of Vatican II had waned.


The details of model shipbuilding are so intricate they can be intimidating. But amateur Greg Zimmerman says the secret is to work on small sections.
– Brian Hill | Personal photographer

He met his wife, Jane, while they were part of a European trip to the Spanish home of the founder of the Claretian Order. They both later attended Loyola University, where he earned his master’s degree in counseling psychology and she attended nursing school. A former Associate Director of Nursing for the DuPage County Health Department, Jane’s passions include piano and guitar, writing, sailing, and leading a mindfulness and meditation class at Monarch Landing. . She also helps with her husband’s shipbuilding.

“I gave the plans to my wife and she sewed the sails,” Zimmerman says, pointing to his detailed work on the 1765 three-masted warship Norske Love.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

He was in his late thirties when he received his first model – a 19th century clipper called “Flying Fish”. He spent six months completing the project and immediately took on the biggest challenges of “plank on frame” designs, where the hull planking is laid piece by piece on the frame, as was the method used by builders. real ships.

“When you first look at plans, you get intimidated,” Zimmerman says of large instruction sheets with hundreds of steps that make assembling an IKEA entertainment center simple. “You’re like, ‘Oh, my God, this is going to take me a century.'”

The secret is just to work on a small section.

“I get great satisfaction watching a section I just finished. It looks great and I move on to another section,” says Zimmerman, who also waxes all the strings used in his models to keep them from rotting. “You’re building something that was structured years and years ago, and now it’s coming back to life.”



Building scale models of famous ships takes dedication but brings great satisfaction, says Greg Zimmerman, who has built a dozen ships in Monarch Landing's carpentry shop in Naperville.

Building scale models of famous ships takes dedication but brings great satisfaction, says Greg Zimmerman, who has built a dozen ships in Monarch Landing’s carpentry shop in Naperville.
– Brian Hill | Personal photographer

After completing his model of the USS Constitution, the wooden-hulled three-master nicknamed “Old Ironsides” for its heroism in the War of 1812, Zimmerman traveled to Boston, where he was able to walk the ship launched for the first times in 1797. He knew the ship inside and out because of his work on the model.

“It was like a week old house,” Zimmerman says. “That was cool.”

He hopes to visit the Mystic Seaport Museum in Connecticut to see the life-size version of his Charles Morgan model of the 19th-century whaler, which contains detailed test pots used to convert blubber into whale oil on deck. Smaller whalers have even more detail. “I took a piece of wire, hammered it, and filed it down like a little harpoon,” Zimmerman says.

His model of the San Felipe, a Spanish galleon launched in 1690, features brass cannons and lanterns. “The back part I had to carve out of wood,” says Zimmerman. “I’m not a woodcarver, but it turned out fine.”

He spent two years building HMS Victory, the English ship that Admiral Horatio Nelson used to win the Battle of Trafalgar on October 21, 1805. In addition to construction work, Zimmerman studied ships and their crews.

“It took 6,000 trees to build the Victory; 2,000 of them were oak,” says Zimmerman. With 350 men on each deck, the English filled the ranks with prisoners, who were chained to the guns. Women were brought on board to appease the men holding these weapons.

“If a child was born from this union, they called him a gun son,” Zimmerman says.

Disciplinaries with multi-tailed whips called a nine-tailed cat would punish sailors who misbehaved. This led to the phrase “Don’t let the cat out of the bag,” Zimmerman says.



The Monarch Landing Senior Community Carpentry Shop in Naperville has all the tools Greg Zimmerman needs to build great model ships.

The Monarch Landing Senior Community Carpentry Shop in Naperville has all the tools Greg Zimmerman needs to build great model ships.
– Brian Hill | Personal photographer

A lifelong learner, Zimmerman hosts Monarch Landing’s discussions of the Civil War. On its bookshelf, the New Jerusalem Bible shares space with the Torah, Quran, Bhagavad Gita, and other religious books, as well as “Joy of Cooking” and “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to T’ai Chi and Qigong”.

Zimmerman, who has performed nearly 1,000 marriages of all faiths, including same-sex marriages, says all religions share certain basic commandments. “Love God, love your neighbour,” Zimmerman says. “That’s how simple life is.”

His most expensive boat model had a list price of $1,200, but he found it on sale for half price. He notes that he still spends less on his hobby than most golfers spend on theirs. Some of his ships will go to the couple’s adult children – Sarah, Michael, Elizabeth and Gregory – or their 10 grandchildren.

“If you ever want a cool hobby, this is it,” Zimmerman says. “I could keep you here all day. It’s so rewarding. Eventually it becomes a discipline. You get really good at it. The skills will come. Don’t worry about it. It will happen.”

At his post in the carpentry shop, a sign reads: “I am the captain of this ship and I have my wife’s permission to say so.” Another features the Latin motto, “In Medio Stat Virtus,” which translates to “virtue stands in the middle.” Zimmerman sees it as “everything in moderation”.

Even with his beloved shipbuilding, Zimmerman practices moderation, limiting himself to a few hours a day. But his time in cabinetmaking led him to discover mandalas, the geometric configuration of symbols, often spiritual, which are a popular art form in Eastern religions. He has already created a few mandala artworks.

As Zimmerman has said many times before, “I have a new passion.”

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