Spanish war – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 05:58:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png Spanish war – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ 32 32 French aluminum industry wants ‘anti-dumping’ measures on cheap Spanish electricity – EURACTIV.com https://faaeeantrapologia.com/french-aluminum-industry-wants-anti-dumping-measures-on-cheap-spanish-electricity-euractiv-com/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 05:30:49 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/french-aluminum-industry-wants-anti-dumping-measures-on-cheap-spanish-electricity-euractiv-com/ As energy prices soared, European aluminum factories began to close as the bloc increased imports from Russia and China. However, French aluminum representatives are pointing to a problem closer to home – saying the EU-backed price cap on Iberian gas is leading to unfair competition and calling for anti-dumping action against Spain. In the spring, […]]]>

As energy prices soared, European aluminum factories began to close as the bloc increased imports from Russia and China. However, French aluminum representatives are pointing to a problem closer to home – saying the EU-backed price cap on Iberian gas is leading to unfair competition and calling for anti-dumping action against Spain.

In the spring, Spain and Portugal reached an agreement with the European Commission on an exception to EU electricity market rules for the Iberian Peninsula.

The deal created a temporary mechanism until the end of May next year that would cap gas prices at an average of €50 per megawatt-hour, halving electricity bills for many Spanish consumers and Portuguese.

Spain and Portugal agree with the European Commission to limit the price of gas

Gas prices on the wholesale electricity market will drop from €90 to around €50 in May to the benefit of Iberian customers, according to a “political agreement” with the European Commission, Spain and Portugal announced on Tuesday.

The deal, which has yet to be finalized…

However, the agreement is temporary as it will only apply until May 31, 2023.

In approving the measures, the EU executive said the scheme would reduce prices for Iberian consumers without “affecting trading conditions to an extent contrary to the common interest” and would keep “distortions of competition to a minimum”.

However, the French aluminum industry disagrees.

As a result of the measures, and in particular for the aluminum used in the building, “French customers will get their supplies from Spain”, Cyrille Mounier of the Aluminum France Federation told EURACTIV France.

Mounier advocates “anti-dumping measures against Spain” to curb what he sees as unfair competition within Europe.

Anti-dumping measures are border measures applied to imports of products from an exporter, which cause dumping injurious to the domestic industry producing a product or to third countries exporting it.

Spain’s Ecological Transition Minister Teresa Ribera said she was unaware of the complaints.

“Our intention is obviously to have stable, predictable and low prices as soon as possible, but it is possible that at some point this could mean a lower energy cost for the Spanish electricity industry compared to the energy cost in d ‘other European countries’, said in an exclusive interview with EFE and EURACTIV.com.

She also pointed out that the energy costs of the German electro-intensive industry were lower due to the price of Russian gas before the war and the intervention of the French government in the electricity market.

In France, industrial producers benefit from regulated access to cheaper nuclear energy – the so-called ARENH regime – which provides them with a certain amount of electricity at a fixed price of €42 per megawatt hour (MWh), but this has was considered insufficient for aluminum producers.

In relation to these measures, “we don’t have any public companies and we don’t inject money from the budget for this,” Ribera said.

“I don’t think there is anything wrong with it, no dumping, no anti-competitive situation or anything like that,” she added.

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Animating Beliefs in Spanish Culture: A Conversation on the “Puppets of the Impossible” https://faaeeantrapologia.com/animating-beliefs-in-spanish-culture-a-conversation-on-the-puppets-of-the-impossible/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 05:20:21 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/animating-beliefs-in-spanish-culture-a-conversation-on-the-puppets-of-the-impossible/ By Ana Salgado, September 27, 2022 On September 14, the Department of Theater and New Dance hosted an event called “Puppets of the Impossible” that featured Esther Fernández, writer and program advisor for Spanish and Portuguese at Rice University. Fernández is an authority on modern Spanish literature and culture, with a focus on the development […]]]>

By Ana Salgado, September 27, 2022

On September 14, the Department of Theater and New Dance hosted an event called “Puppets of the Impossible” that featured Esther Fernández, writer and program advisor for Spanish and Portuguese at Rice University.

Fernández is an authority on modern Spanish literature and culture, with a focus on the development of theater and its relationship to the country’s emerging civil society. Fernandez is also a Resident Associate at Wiess College, where she also serves as Divisional Counselor for the Humanities, and is a Fellow of the Center for Teaching Excellence. She recently published a book called “To Embody the Marvelous”.

The main objective of the event was to study how the movement of animated objects and puppets used in ceremonial contexts in the Iberian Peninsula in the early modern period became an essential element for transmitting didactic knowledge without commitment. direct human.

Fernández explores these man-made entities through artistic storytelling and shows how they inspireed deep theological ideas and at other times served a practical or pleasurable purpose.

During the event, Fernández shared his own explanation of animations that look like puppets and are created expressly to simulate simple physical movements in religious and ceremonial contexts that have existed since the dawn of mankind.

The discussion lasted an hour as Fernández summarized the figures of the articulated Christ, or “Cristos articulados”, that is to say articulated virgins – puppets representing holy protagonists, mechanical monsters, like the Tarasca who parade in Corpus Christi processions and religious automatons.

Especially in early modern Spain, these moveable objects and puppet figures all evolved into awe-inspiring and uplifting artifacts that audiences found extremely appealing, Fernández shared.

She also touched on various topics such as how their main dramatic effect was to make everyone who watched or interacted with them feel alive. These artificially animated beings had the ability to convey profound theological concepts in some cases, while providing amusement or utility in other situations.

Ana Salgado | Post Poly

Fernández’s words and style of expression are highly valued in the community of Spanish literary and theater artists. Marta Albalá Pelegrín, professor of modern Iberian literature and Renaissance theater, liked what Fernández had to say.

“I wanted to give Cal Poly Pomona students the chance to get involved not only in their research,” Albalá Pelegrín said. “But also, with the practice of managing a puppet and the feelings a puppet can evoke, as well as the ability of theater to transport audiences, engage them in the performance, and bring theater to communities.”

According to Albalá Pelegrín, Fernández takes students to the roots of puppet theater, so having a talk by Fernández at the CPP would benefit students in ways that she could not. Fernández, who performs with the puppet group Dragoncillo, a group of academics familiar with the golden age of theater, can bring people together and educate them about creating these kinds of communities through theater.

Theater student Stephanie Alvarado shared her feelings after attending the event.

“I thought that was pretty fascinating in terms of how stupid the puppet is and stuff, probably, when you think about it,” Alvarado said. “But now that I’ve seen that presentation was talking about the importance of religion and how it affects people’s feelings in such a profound way. After the event I believed the techniques used to bring these puppets to life, I found it quite interesting to see the significant relevance of stories like the Virgin and Christ being amplified. Overall I really liked it and it helped me respect puppetry as art.

Fernández said she finds inspiration and knowledge in theater and would like to see more theater that takes place in Spain and Latin America, especially for students who are native speakers.

“All of this cultural diversity that Latin America and Spain have is something that my company, Dragoncillo, offers to students who can grasp it and to native speakers to give back to the culture,” Fernández said.

Fernández never considered theater as something religious, even if it presents political and social problems. She believes that by attending a show, she will advance politically, culturally and socially. She insists that plays should break down stereotypes.

“I think you have to go there with a very open mind and see what resonates with you and what resonates with me. What better than to be united in a theater for a play, in these times of war, we can have a space of peace and coexistence,” Fernández shared.

The campus community can learn more about Fernández by visiting him website and watch a show Dragoncilloa group of puppeteers dedicated to creative storytelling that entertains and educates audiences.

Image courtesy of Ana Salgado

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Giorgia Meloni, leader of the Italian far right at the dawn of power https://faaeeantrapologia.com/giorgia-meloni-leader-of-the-italian-far-right-at-the-dawn-of-power/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 16:03:50 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/giorgia-meloni-leader-of-the-italian-far-right-at-the-dawn-of-power/ Giorgia Meloni succeeded in rebranding her party as the Brothers of Italy as the dominant conservative force in the country, without completely erasing its post-fascist roots. Her right-wing coalition is set to come to power after Sunday’s general election, making her favorite to become Italy’s first female prime minister – and its first far-right post-war […]]]>

Giorgia Meloni succeeded in rebranding her party as the Brothers of Italy as the dominant conservative force in the country, without completely erasing its post-fascist roots. Her right-wing coalition is set to come to power after Sunday’s general election, making her favorite to become Italy’s first female prime minister – and its first far-right post-war prime minister.

The new Italian right-wing darling summed up her personal brand in a now-famous tirade at a rally in 2019, which went viral after it was remixed into a piece of dance music.

“I’m Giorgia, I’m a woman, I’m a mother, I’m Italian, I’m Christian,” an excited Meloni told supporters in central Rome. “No one will take it away from me.”

The phrase has become a leitmotif of Meloni’s astonishing rise from leader of a fringe party with roots in Italy’s post-fascist right to the country’s likely next leader.

It captures the seeming paradox at the heart of Italy’s looming elections, a high-stakes vote that could usher in the most significant change in decades – a first female prime minister – while handing over power to the most conservative government since World War II. world.

Pollsters predict that Meloni’s Brothers of Italy party will become Italy’s largest party, winning a quarter of the vote – a more than five-fold increase from its score in the last general election in 2018. She is poised to overtake his better-known right-wing party. allies Matteo Salvini and Silvio Berlusconi, easily topping their combined tallies.

With Italy’s convoluted electoral law favoring broad coalitions, the three right-wing parties are well on their way to crushing the fractured center-left, potentially giving a Meloni-led government a large enough majority to change Italy’s constitution.

Europe under siege

The coda to Meloni’s ‘Christian mother’ harangue, which she repeated verbatim in Spanish at a rally in support of Spain’s far-right party last year, underscores fears of a camp arch-conservative who feels beleaguered in a fast-paced globalized world. -a changing world.

In Meloni’s mind, the besieging forces include immigration, Islam, European integration, “woke ideologies” and what she describes as “LGBT lobbies.” It’s a view she shares with the likes of Hungary’s Viktor Orban, whom she has vigorously defended in her squabbles with Brussels over democracy and the rule of law.

Until recently, her ideological role models also included Russian Vladimir Putin, whom she praised for “defending European values ​​and Christian identity” in her 2021 book, “I am Giorgia”. But she has since distanced herself from the Kremlin man, unequivocally condemning his invasion of Ukraine and backing Western sanctions against Moscow.


Last month, she recorded a video message in three languages ​​to reassure Italy’s partners that it would stick to Rome’s traditional alliances, including NATO. She also dismissed as “nonsense” claims that she leads an authoritarian government.

“We fiercely oppose any anti-democratic drift with words of firmness that we do not always find in the Italian and European left,” Meloni, 45, said in the message sent to foreign media in English, French and Spanish. .

“The Italian right has been making history of fascism for decades, unequivocally condemning the suppression of democracy and ignominious anti-Jewish laws,” she added.

Post-fascist roots

Meloni was 19 when she was first interviewed by foreign media as she sought an election campaign in her native Rome. She told French reporters at the time that “[fascist dictator Benito] Mussolini was a good politician, in the sense that everything he did, he did for Italy.

She would later change her tone, saying that the dictator had made “mistakes”.

Meloni was raised by her mother in the working-class neighborhood of Garbatella in Rome, after her father left them when she was just 2 years old. Garbatella was a stronghold of the left, but young Meloni chose the opposite side.

As a teenager, she joined the youth wing of the Italian Social Movement (MSI), a far-right formation created after the war by supporters of Mussolini. She won her first local election aged 21 and became Italy’s youngest minister a decade later when she was given the youth portfolio in Berlusconi’s 2008 government.

After the collapse of Berlusconi’s last administration, she founded her own party with other MSI veterans, naming it after the opening lines of the national anthem, Fratelli from Italy. Since then, she has gradually managed to propel the Brothers of Italy into the mainstream – without ever completely denying her post-fascist roots.

In particular, she rejected calls to remove from her party’s logo a tricolor flame which was an icon of the MSI and refers to the fascist tradition.

Supporters waving flags for Giorgia Meloni's Brothers of Italy Day in Milan's Piazza Duomo.
Supporters waving flags for Giorgia Meloni’s Brothers of Italy Day in Milan’s Piazza Duomo. © Benjamin Dodman, FRANCE 24

Meloni played down the ideological origins of his party, saying it is a dominant force similar to the British Conservative Party. But during the election campaign, she was careful not to alienate the main supporters who associate themselves with the tricolor flame.

“I dream of a nation where people who for many years have had to put their heads down, pretending to have different ideas so as not to be ostracized, can now speak their minds,” she said during the interview. a rally earlier this week.

Alone in opposition

While ideology still mobilizes his party base, Meloni’s growing popularity with the general public has more to do with his pragmatism and calculated political actions, which earned him a reputation for steadfastness and consistency.

While Salvini and Berlusconi teamed up with the center-left last year to form a unity government under Mario Draghi, Meloni refused, calling the appointment of the former eurozone central banker undemocratic.

Her decision to avoid the national unity coalition made her a natural recipient of Italy’s protest vote, said Maurizio Cotta, a political science professor at the University of Siena.

“Meloni skillfully exploited his position as the main opposition force,” Cotta explained in an interview last week. “She capitalized on the resentment of some of the population towards Draghi’s government – a capable and efficient administration that also came across as harsh and technocratic.”

The far-right leader has also taken advantage of the weakness and blunders of her right-wing allies, stealing support from the once-popular Salvini, whose position has plummeted since a botched power grab in 2019.

“She came across as a wiser and more credible politician than Salvini, offering responsible opposition and maintaining cordial relations with Draghi,” Cotta said.

At the same time, she has sought to reassure those who question her lack of experience, with her “Ready” slogan adorning billboards across the country.

‘God, fatherland, family’

On European issues too, Meloni has sought to balance conciliatory gestures with fiery rhetoric aimed at galvanizing his base.

Wary of Italy’s huge debt, she has emphasized fiscal prudence, despite her coalition’s call for tax cuts and increased social spending. She has pledged to support EU sanctions against Russia – in stark contrast to Salvini, who is still struggling to shake off the fallout from his past flattering Putin.

However, Meloni also warned that she would start “defending Italy’s national interests”, telling EU officials that “free riding is over”.

A future government led by Meloni is likely to draw attention to the subject of human rights, especially in its treatment of migrants and minorities. She called for a naval blockade of the Mediterranean coast of Africa to prevent migrants from reaching Italy.

Like other far-right formations, his party has supplemented its nationalist and anti-immigrant rhetoric with messages about conservative social values ​​and the protection of traditional families, vehemently opposing adoptions by same-sex couples. Its motto is “God, country, family”.

Although Meloni insists that she will not abolish Italy’s abortion law, Brothers of Italy has already decided to restrict its application in the regions it controls. Insisting on the need to bolster Italy’s low birth rate, party officials have hinted at the “Great Replacement” theory, a conspiracy suggesting that global elites want to replace Europeans with immigrants.

So many elements that denote stormy relations with the EU, believes Gianfranco Pasquino, professor emeritus of political science at the University of Bologna, who however minimized the risks of a breakdown in relations with Brussels.

“The foreign press is worried about a Meloni government but these fears are exaggerated,” he said. “There will certainly be clashes with Europe, but Meloni is more of a politician than an ideologue – she will not seek a radical break.”

Whatever kind of government Meloni eventually ushers in, Pasquino said, Italy will undoubtedly persevere.

“Italy never do particularly well, but the advantage is that they never do very well either.”

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How We Got to Guam – InsideSources https://faaeeantrapologia.com/how-we-got-to-guam-insidesources/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 01:08:10 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/how-we-got-to-guam-insidesources/ Fort Santa Agueda, Guam (Yashuhiro S., Flickr) Admit it, you never stopped wondering how the United States won the peaceful island of Guam, right? There is no reason to do so. That doesn’t happen in dinner conversations. And they certainly didn’t teach it in school. Guam was not taken in a great battle or fought […]]]>

Fort Santa Agueda, Guam (Yashuhiro S., Flickr)

Admit it, you never stopped wondering how the United States won the peaceful island of Guam, right? There is no reason to do so. That doesn’t happen in dinner conversations. And they certainly didn’t teach it in school.

Guam was not taken in a great battle or fought over by delicate diplomatic negotiations. The reason we acquired it was simple: bureaucratic clumsiness. A classic failure to communicate. Here’s how it went.

Just 210 square miles, tiny Guam sits in the Western Pacific. There is nothing special on the island. It was simply a convenient location for ships stopping en route to distant destinations such as China.

Spain claimed the place in the 1660s and it remained a remote outpost of this distant empire for almost 250 years.

Until the Spanish-American War.

After the battleship USS Maine exploded under shady circumstances in Havana harbor in early 1898, Congress declared war on the crumbling Spanish Empire on April 21. Places like Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Philippines became American possessions after fierce battles at San Juan Hill and Manila. Bay.

Since we were gobbling up so much Spanish territory, the top brass in Washington decided that seizing Guam would be a wise move. The navy’s role extended considerably into the Pacific, and it would make for a nifty coaling station. (Steamships burned tons of coal and often had to refuel at sea.)

Captain Henry Glass was ordered to take the cruiser USS Charleston and seize the small island. She was accompanied by three steamboats full of troops. If the Spaniards were ready to defend Guam, Uncle Sam was ready to fight for it.

The small flotilla arrived on June 21. Glass left the transports at sea and boldly sailed into Guam’s main port. All he encountered was a harmless Japanese merchant ship. The Charleston dropped anchor and fired 13 guns towards Fort Santa Cruz, a decaying relic of Spain’s glory days in the 17th century. The fort did not return a single shot. The Americans thought it was strange.

So they sent a boat to the Japanese ship to see what was going on.

Then something strange happened. While the boat was rowing towards the Japanese ship, another boat flying the Spanish flag was rowing towards the Charleston. The four men there were waving friendly gestures.

Glass and his officers were confused.

They dropped a rope ladder and the Spaniards climbed aboard.

The harbor master, his doctor and the other two smiled broadly. They were delighted with the surprise visit, they said. They thanked the Americans for having “saluteed” the Spanish flag with the cannon shots. They shyly admitted they were out of gunpowder, but if the Americans would be kind enough to give them some, they would gladly fire a salute in return, as military etiquette demands.

The Spaniards were stunned when Glass informed them that they were prisoners of war. Now it was their turn to confuse. How could they be prisoners of war when there was no war?

Madrid had not bothered to inform the Guam garrison of this. In the days before radio communication, all messages were delivered by boat. And the last time the Spaniards had heard from the mother country was April 14, seven days before the declaration of war.

The Spaniards were unable to resist. The garrison consisted of a motley collection of 69 men with four non-functioning guns. And even if the cannons had been usable, they had no gunpowder to fire them with.

Thus, Guam became American territory – until December 7, 1941, when Japanese troops seized it a few hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The United States reclaimed the island after a bloody battle in the summer of 1944. Old Glory has flown there ever since.

What exactly is the moral of this story, you ask? After looking everywhere, I found only this: when your country is at war, the lack of communication can have disastrous consequences.

Oh, and make sure the gunpowder arrives on time too.

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! Spanish News Today – Amazon halts expansion in Spain as online shopping market bottom falls https://faaeeantrapologia.com/spanish-news-today-amazon-halts-expansion-in-spain-as-online-shopping-market-bottom-falls/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 08:29:37 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/spanish-news-today-amazon-halts-expansion-in-spain-as-online-shopping-market-bottom-falls/ Publication date: 09/21/2022 The logistics giant will halt the expansion of its warehouses in Spain until at least 2024 Amid high economic uncertainty and steadily rising inflation rates, online retail giant Amazon has called for the construction of any new logistics warehouses in Spain to be suspended until 2024, issuing an ominous order to ” […]]]>

Publication date: 09/21/2022

The logistics giant will halt the expansion of its warehouses in Spain until at least 2024

Amid high economic uncertainty and steadily rising inflation rates, online retail giant Amazon has called for the construction of any new logistics warehouses in Spain to be suspended until 2024, issuing an ominous order to ” wait and see” to its local teams.

The growth of the online sales market during the pandemic catapulted Amazon to the world’s No. 1 in logistics, but a change in consumer behavior led Jeff Bezos’ company to report its first quarterly losses in seven years in May.

As a result, work will cease in the warehouses under construction in Reus (Tarragona), Girona, Vitoria and Seville, Murcia, Zaragoza, Vitoria, San Sebastian and Asturias, leaving around 150,000 square meters of land in Spain unused.

Despite the explosive announcement, Amazon reaffirmed its commitment to Spain, promising to “continue on the path to fulfilling our promise to have 25,000 permanent employees in the country by 2025. We will end 2022 with more than 20,000 permanent employees, after having created 2,000 jobs”. This year.”

“In 2022, we opened new logistics stations, Amazon Fresh hubs and a logistics center (in Spain),” the company said in a statement.

Most recently, the retailer launched a 130,000 square meter storage and management facility in Onda in July.

Despite the commitment of the multinational, the current economic situation in Spain does not bode well. Rising inflation has jeopardized Amazon’s low-margin model, a situation that could force it to raise prices to avoid huge losses. The flip side is that price increases will almost certainly discourage potential buyers, who are already suffering from inflated costs across the board.

Image: Archive

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Diego Luna and Adria Arjona recorded the Spanish dub of their character https://faaeeantrapologia.com/diego-luna-and-adria-arjona-recorded-the-spanish-dub-of-their-character/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 13:42:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/diego-luna-and-adria-arjona-recorded-the-spanish-dub-of-their-character/ It’s a very cool thing when fans in other parts of the world can hear the main cast of a project, and that’s exactly what will happen with Disney+. Andor. The two stars of the series Diego Luna and Adria Arjona provided the Spanish dub for their characters in the star wars prequel series. Andor […]]]>

It’s a very cool thing when fans in other parts of the world can hear the main cast of a project, and that’s exactly what will happen with Disney+. Andor. The two stars of the series Diego Luna and Adria Arjona provided the Spanish dub for their characters in the star wars prequel series. Andor premieres later this week on Disney+ with its first three episodes.


Luna being from Mexico and Arjona from Puerto Rico, the two actors recorded their dialogue in Spanish. Luna made the announcement last week during the show’s panel at Disney’s D23 convention. Both actors beamed with pride onstage as they broke the news, with Luna in particular declaring her appreciation for the Latino fan base. The star said those fans were “with them through the process.”

COLLIDER VIDEO OF THE DAY

Luna reprises her role from the 2016 prequel film Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. Andor is a prequel to this film, showing the character’s attraction to ambition and dedication to rebellion. Arjona plays a new character called Bix Caleen. Stellan Skarsgard, Denise Gough, Kyle Soller, Fiona Shawand Ebon Moss-Bachrach play supporting roles in the series. Genevieve O’Reilly and Whitaker Forest reprise their roles as Mon Mothma and Saw Gerrera from A thug respectively. Tony Gilroywho co-wrote A thugis the showrunner.

Related: Before ‘Andor’: A History of Rebellion in Star Wars, From ‘Rogue One’ to ‘The Force Awakens’

The first reactions to Andor praised the prequel series, calling it “complex and mature”. One of the main criticisms leveled at star wars Recent projects have been their lack of exploring parts of the galaxy far, far away without Jedis, lightsabers, and the dark side. Based on the reactions of critics, fans who had these negative feelings should be extremely pleased with the solid and concrete nature of Andor.

Andor is the fourth live action star wars show premiering on Disney+. The Mandalorian helped inaugurate the Mouse House streaming service, airing its first episode on the day the streamer launched. Boba Fett’s Book and Obi Wan Kenobi have since been created. There are also several shows in development, from Ahsoka with Rosario Dawson at The Acolytewhich features Amandla Stenberg, Jodie TurnerSmith, Manny Hyacinth, Lee Jung Jae and Charlie Barnett. In addition, a third season of The Mandalorian is scheduled to premiere next year.

Andor will premiere on Disney+ this Wednesday (Sept. 21) with its first three episodes. New episodes will then be released weekly until mid-November.

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The Hispanic Heritage Festival will be held at the Kenosha Public Museum on Saturday afternoon | Local News https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-hispanic-heritage-festival-will-be-held-at-the-kenosha-public-museum-on-saturday-afternoon-local-news/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-hispanic-heritage-festival-will-be-held-at-the-kenosha-public-museum-on-saturday-afternoon-local-news/ The Kenosha Public Museum, in conjunction with Bradford High School, will host a Hispanic Heritage Festival Saturday afternoon at the museum, located at 5500 1st Ave. “This is our first year working with the Kenosha Public Museum,” said Lee Belanger-Gonzales, chair of the World Languages ​​Department and AP Spanish teacher at Bradford High School. “So […]]]>

The Kenosha Public Museum, in conjunction with Bradford High School, will host a Hispanic Heritage Festival Saturday afternoon at the museum, located at 5500 1st Ave.

“This is our first year working with the Kenosha Public Museum,” said Lee Belanger-Gonzales, chair of the World Languages ​​Department and AP Spanish teacher at Bradford High School. “So this is the second year overall, but the first year with the museum.”

The event, which will be held from noon to 3 p.m., will include games and crafts from various Hispanic cultures with the Latino Empowerment Club of Bradford, vocal music from Grupo Tidente of Bradford, flamenco dance tutorials and opportunities to learn about Hispanic countries, Hispanic changemakers, and what Hispanic really means.

“There are information signs that will define what it means to be Hispanic,” Belanger-Gonzales said. “And talk about the Hispanic involvement in the Civil War, because a lot of people aren’t aware of the heavy involvement of Mexican Americans in our Civil War.”

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Mi Gente from Carthage College, Latinos Unidos from Indian Trail High School and Latinos Unidos from UW-Parkside will be present with additional activities.

“The biggest thing that I look forward to and what we hope to achieve is for the Kenosha community to interact with Hispanic people, and kind of get to know them and build that level of comfort within the cultures. ,” says Belanger-Gonzales.

Cultural dishes will also be offered, such as bighead tacos, tamales and other selections.

“As our Hispanic heritage students interact with the larger community, they connect with them and the community that connects with these Hispanic students,” Belanger-Gonzales said. “And obviously we’ve had some issues here in Kenosha, so it can’t be a bad thing when people are starting to appreciate the cultural differences and interact in a friendly way.”

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Diego Luna: cinemas leave “very little room” for films in Spanish https://faaeeantrapologia.com/diego-luna-cinemas-leave-very-little-room-for-films-in-spanish/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 20:00:32 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/diego-luna-cinemas-leave-very-little-room-for-films-in-spanish/ “The greatest amount of pressure [blockbusters] having on cinemas leaves very little room for Spanish-speaking films,” the “Andor” star said. Diego Luna is appalled at how big budget blockbusters eclipse international art films. More than 20 years after her award-winning turn at the Venice Film Festival in Alfonso Cuarón’s “Y Tu Mamá También,” Luna has […]]]>

“The greatest amount of pressure [blockbusters] having on cinemas leaves very little room for Spanish-speaking films,” the “Andor” star said.

Diego Luna is appalled at how big budget blockbusters eclipse international art films.

More than 20 years after her award-winning turn at the Venice Film Festival in Alfonso Cuarón’s “Y Tu Mamá También,” Luna has reflected on the current state of Mexican cinema.

“We don’t have a healthy industry these days,” Luna told GQ. “It’s very difficult to get your money back from the box office.”

He added: “The amount of pressure exerted by the middle finger [blockbusters] have on cinemas leaves very little room for Spanish-speaking films.

Luna currently directs the Disney+ “Star Wars” series “Andor,” which takes place five years before the events of “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” one of those major theatrical blockbusters.

For Luna, the critically acclaimed “Y Tu Mamá También” not only marked a turning point in her budding career, but also cemented a new direction for cinema as a whole.

“We were telling a very specific story [and] you had to read the subtitles and the audience responded,” Luna explained of the Mexican feature. “I suddenly realized there was a chance that specificity would take you far.”

The “Narcos” alum said of the history of Mexican cinema: “People went to the cinema to see stories where they could see themselves and their context represented. At the time, there were very few films that the government wanted to fund. This control no longer exists.

The ‘La Máquina’ actor previously told IndieWire’s Eric Kohn that he was encouraged to try losing his accent when he arrived in the US from Hollywood. “They used to call it ‘neutralising’, like it was something you could just get rid of. It was a fear of understanding,” Luna revealed.

He continued to act in “Star Wars” and now in the series “Andor”, “It was not a decision to keep my accent. If they hire me, I come with that. But when they chosen, they clearly send the message that they are trying to represent a world similar to the one we live in, where people speak differently and have a rich cultural and linguistic diversity.

Luna concluded, “We can’t generalize and say, ‘The whole industry is doing this to us. The industry is full of very sensible people that I meet every day to try to turn things around and make them better. The debate is enriched and becomes much more interesting. I experience change every day – otherwise I’d be doing theater in Mexico and wouldn’t even care.

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“All Quiet on the Western Front”: Toronto Review | Comments https://faaeeantrapologia.com/all-quiet-on-the-western-front-toronto-review-comments/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 22:31:58 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/all-quiet-on-the-western-front-toronto-review-comments/ Real. Edward Berger. Germany. 2022. 143 minutes Conflicts never seem to end, and the role of war films has always been to deal – repeatedly – ​​with the human desire to annihilate “the enemy”. (War films were among the first ever made, including short documentary clips of the Spanish-American War in 1898.) German veteran Erich […]]]>

Real. Edward Berger. Germany. 2022. 143 minutes

Conflicts never seem to end, and the role of war films has always been to deal – repeatedly – ​​with the human desire to annihilate “the enemy”. (War films were among the first ever made, including short documentary clips of the Spanish-American War in 1898.) German veteran Erich Maria Remarque, shocked by the so-called “war to end all wars “, wrote ‘All Quiet on the Western Front’ in 1928, and it was filmed, winning three Oscars, two years later. Now Edward Berger returns to the German source material, adding some twists, in a heartbreaking and visceral adaptation of a nearly century-old work, written when ruined veterans could still hear the sound of gunfire in their dreams.

Berger brings back the message of every war movie in the simplest, most direct way

Supported and distributed by Netflix, this is the original war epic. There is no twist; it’s not billed as a one-shot chase movie like Sam Mendes’ 1917a romance Merry Christmas or the cruel story of the life of a Battle horse. The teenagers go to war; they die, horribly, and they are repeatedly betrayed by their ruling classes. Germany’s entry into the international Oscars category is a tough and accomplished watch. With us, it will be watched with interest as a long-awaited return to its legacy. His sacrifice of the family elements of the novel in favor of a cross-section from the front to the peace negotiations works well to give tension to a feature film. A tough test of endurance on home screens, where it hits the streamer from October 28, it’s a rewarding, if deeply moving and at times overwhelming, theatrical experience.

Edward Berger (TV series Patrick Melrosethe little-watched title of the Berlinale All my Love) dramatically ups the ante for this widescreen spectacle of death and destruction. Its overriding purpose is to illustrate the bloody repetitiveness of war – the back-and-forth nature of this years-long futile struggle for mere yards of land. Before the credits, a crane shot lowers over footage of the dead as a boy soldier named Heinrich runs over and is immediately killed. His clothes are stripped from his body in a bloody mass of corpses, bagged, washed, altered, and sent back to the next recruit who will – literally – fill his boots. A double bass is an anachronistic touch but raises the fear of what is to come for the viewer. A new journey has begun.

The boy in the redone uniform is the central character of the film Paul Baumer (the wide-eyed debutant Felix Kammerer), born in 1899 and on the front lines in the third year of the war. He and his classmates are full of fervor – ready to march on Paris! – but they will never advance more than a few meters before plunging back into their rat-infested trenches. One by one they die, as a starving Paul manages to survive for 14 months and forms a bond with the older soldier Katczinsky, or Kat (Albrecht Schuch).

Kat has more experience than Paul and comes from a different social class – he can’t read – but they form a desperate bond; dreaming of home, even though they now know that victory is impossible. Brief moments on a farm in the Champagne region are immediately corrected when Paul and Kat find a whole convoy of new recruits gassed to death. Germany will soon be empty, they sigh.

Berger spares the viewer nothing as Paul’s innocent blue eyes gradually turn into a battle-hardened gaze. Men die brutally before they have had a chance to live, sometimes by their own hands. He spends a night in a dirty trench, watching a man he repeatedly stabbed gurgle and die.

What stops Everyone is silent to become too sad, too cruel, to watch is the character cross-section of Daniel Bruhl, the liberal politician Erzberger, as he tries to claim peace against the wishes of a vain army, personified by General Friedrich (Devid Striesow) who insists on repeatedly sending his troops to certain death. Defeat, when it comes, will be on French terms and, as Erzbeger has 72 hours to sign, Friedrich fires Paul in an unsuccessful outing.

The film touches on the terms of the Armistice and the tensions it will create in the future, while we hope against all odds for a life for Paul that he seems to have abandoned. Berger is keen to show the class differences between the ruling elite and the children they sent to die, which was interchangeable between camps and, for that matter, between wars.

Filmed in the Czech Republic, Everyone is silent is gruelingly realistic: impressive battle sequences follow one another with the sounds of conflict erupting in a cinematic bombardment. With the brutal ongoing struggle in Ukraine for territory, Berger brings back the message of every war movie in the simplest and most direct way – the cost in lives, yes, but also, our collective humanity.

Production Company: Amusement Park Film

Worldwide Distribution: Netflix

Producers: Malte Grunert, Daniel Dreifuss, Edward Berger

Screenplay: Edward Berger, Lesley Paterson, Ian Stokell, based on the novel by Erich Maria Remarque

Photography: James Friend

Production Design: Christian M. Goldbeck

Editing: Sven Budelmann

Music: Volker Bertelmann

Main cast: Felix Kammerer, Albrecht Schuch, Aaron Hilmer, Moritz Klaus, Thibault de Montalembert, Daniel Brühl, Devid Striesow

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Former Webb City Exchange Student Remains Ukrainian Refugee in Poland | Local News https://faaeeantrapologia.com/former-webb-city-exchange-student-remains-ukrainian-refugee-in-poland-local-news/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/former-webb-city-exchange-student-remains-ukrainian-refugee-in-poland-local-news/ Over the past six months, while living as a refugee in a foreign land, Sofiya Bezpala has tapped into a vein of undiscovered love and warmth for her native Ukraine. “With each passing month of war, I just have this (growing) love for my country,” she said. In 2017, when Bezpala, now 21, spent a […]]]>

Over the past six months, while living as a refugee in a foreign land, Sofiya Bezpala has tapped into a vein of undiscovered love and warmth for her native Ukraine.

“With each passing month of war, I just have this (growing) love for my country,” she said.

In 2017, when Bezpala, now 21, spent a year living with Amy and Kurt Krtek of Oronogo and attending Webb City High School as part of the Future Leaders Exchange Program, she often talked about traveling and living in places far from each other. side of the globe. It was important to her.

But now?

“The only place I want to travel is at home,” she told The Globe during a recent Zoom interview from where she lives in central Europe, her voice cracking. “One thing I know for sure is that if I choose a place to settle down, it will be my home. I want to live here; I want people to understand how proud I am to be surrounded by (my) people. I am Ukrainian in every molecule of my blood, from the top of my head to my toes.

Although her home country is very close, the fighting still raging in the northern, eastern and southern parts presents too much danger for her or her parents to return there permanently.

“I want to get closer to home, but I can’t,” she said. “I now know how much freedom costs.”

A refugee in Poland

Bezpala and his parents were forced to flee their hometown of Kharkiv in March after their country was invaded in February by forces led by Russian President Vladimir Putin. Their city of 1.4 million has become a key battleground due to its proximity to the Russian border, just 30 miles away.

After hiding for six days inside the city – occasionally encountering artillery barrages and missile strikes – the family spent another six days crossing the width of Ukraine, which is roughly the size of Texas.

Arriving in Poland, they were among the 12 million Ukrainian citizens who fled their homes following the Russian invasion. Days after moving into a refugee home in Warsaw, their lives were suddenly filled with “unknowns and uncertainties” for the foreseeable future, Bezpala said.

But then America came calling.

During her year of living with the Krtek family, Amy Krtek and Bezpala formed a special mother-daughter bond that has only grown stronger over the past six months. Bezpala proudly calls Krtek her “second mother” or “American mom.”

It was Krtek who, working diligently from his home in Oronogo, raised over $5,000 for Bezpala and his parents, transferring the money directly to Poland.

“Sofia is in a NATO country; she is safe,” Krtek said during the Zoom meeting. “One of these days, I can see her again. It’s just heartbreaking, here on my side, because I can’t be there with her. She’s going through so much trauma right now, and I just wish I could give her a hug.

Bezpala said she couldn’t imagine where she and her family could be now without the fundraising help of the Krteks.

“It would still be just as difficult. We were all lost here, my family, myself. This support has kept us alive and afloat,” she said. “I can’t imagine my life without my American family. This year-long trip (to southwest Missouri) just changed my life tremendously. America has come to us again.”

Grounded and centered

Despite her refugee status, Bezpala is trying to rebuild herself, little by little, one day at a time.

“Right now I would say things are a bit easier” than they were when they arrived in Poland, Bezpala said.

She lived with her parents for four months, mostly in a private apartment made available to them by the Polish government, before she was able to move out on her own. She now has a boyfriend, Max, who is from the same Kharkiv district where she lived before the Russian invasion. Because he can work remotely, they were able to travel outside of Poland and they expect to be in Croatia until the end of October.

Because Bezpala is fluent in Polish, English and Russian, she spent several days in eastern Poland, volunteering to help displaced refugees from her country find temporary shelter.

” I like to help ; I love volunteering,” she said.

On several occasions, Bezpala ventured across the border for brief visits inside Ukraine, transferring donated medical supplies from Poland to Ukrainian soldiers and medical officials stationed in Lviv. Round trip, it takes him about 30 hours to refuel.

Krtek said she was nervous every time Bezpala visited the war-torn country. On the other hand, “I’m so proud of her because she needed all this help but she was always helping others,” she said. “Here she is, a refugee living in another country, and she’s spent so much time and energy helping others, raising funds and raising awareness. I just think that’s great.

Bezpala continues to teach basic English to Ukrainian refugees at a Polish school. In her spare time, she is also learning two new languages: Spanish and Turkish.

“I love learning languages; it’s my passion and it makes me extremely happy,” she said.

She and Krtek often converse in Spanish.

“I love his positive attitude,” Krtek said. “I want everyone to be like her.”

‘I’m so lucky’

Despite the upheaval, Bezpala said she had little to complain about after helping so many of her fellow refugees and listening to their stories.

“I try to think about the things that are important to me – the people I’ve been separated from and want to hug right now, the war veterans I worked with who are no longer with us “, she said. “I don’t want to swear now but…I’m so lucky. Look, I’ve got my four limbs. I’ve got everything I could ask for – everything. There’s nothing else I need. need apart from my friends, the ability to volunteer and help, and that’s it.

She prays for the day when Russian forces leave and every displaced Ukrainian can return home.

“Ukrainians are famous for their holidays, so I don’t know how many days we will celebrate ‘after the war is over,’ but it will be a big day,” she said. Until that happens, “I hope and pray every day that it will happen soon and that Ukraine will finally be free.”

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