Spanish war – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png Spanish war – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ 32 32 The Philippines Election Shows How Personality Politics Is Our Collective Future in an Age of Digital Populism https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-philippines-election-shows-how-personality-politics-is-our-collective-future-in-an-age-of-digital-populism/ Tue, 17 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/the-philippines-election-shows-how-personality-politics-is-our-collective-future-in-an-age-of-digital-populism/ On June 30, “Bongbong” Ferdinand Marcos Jr, son of a former kleptocratic dictator who ruled the Philippines under martial law for nearly a decade (1972-1981), will assume the presidency of that country. He does so after being elected through a democratic process – but one in which the information and story have been heavily distorted. […]]]>

On June 30, “Bongbong” Ferdinand Marcos Jr, son of a former kleptocratic dictator who ruled the Philippines under martial law for nearly a decade (1972-1981), will assume the presidency of that country. He does so after being elected through a democratic process – but one in which the information and story have been heavily distorted.

Politics is family and personal in the Philippines, starting with its very name. The country bears the name of King Philip II of Spain, under whose reign (from 1565) the territory was placed under Spanish control and its colonial colonies developed there, largely at the expense of the indigenous population. The territory was a colony for 382 years, making it the country with the longest period of settlement. This colonial history would also include a five-decade stint by the United States, which ruled the country from 1898 after taking it back from Spain. (There is historical evidence that Spain actually handed it over to the United States during the Spanish-American War to be defeated by another white country instead of native forces that were close to victory). Japan also occupied the country for three years during World War II, between 1941 and 1945.

In an interesting turn of events, when the most prominent opposition to the Marcos regime, Senator Benigno Aquino Jr, was assassinated in 1983, his mantle was taken over by his family, who themselves eventually ascended to power. Aquino’s widow, Corazon Aquino, was to be elected president (1986-1992) after the overthrow of the Marcos dictatorship. His son, Benigno Aquino III, was later elected president in 2010.

His successor, incumbent President Rodrigo Duterte, took office in 2016 in a populist wave that propelled the anti-drug and talkative mayor of Davao City, who led a controversial anti-drug crusade that resulted in the extrajudicial execution of tens of thousands of people. . In the 2022 elections, Rodrigo Duterte’s daughter, Sara Duterte (who also succeeded him as mayor of Davao when he became president) won the country’s vice presidency. Her election shows that the family name carries a lot of weight in the country, and she could well be seen as the political heiress of her father, who cannot run because the Philippine Constitution prohibits more than one term for presidents. . In November 2021, Rodrigo Duterte announced his intention to run for vice president himself before apparently changing his mind. Sara Duterte’s ascension to vice president may also mean he will be immune from criminal investigation, particularly into the killings that took place during his anti-drug crusade.

For South Africa, the election will mean very little. We can anticipate business as usual. The small but growing trade relationship, which has grown from R2 billion to R2.5 billion over the past six years (with a current deficit of R1.8 billion for South Africa), is likely to continue regardless of who is in power in the Southeast Asian country. But indirect implications can take shape through the Philippines-China-US formation.

One of the key questions is whether the new president will continue the balanced approach towards the two nations that dominate his region, China and the United States. There has been a shift from Washington to Beijing under Duterte, although it has begun to adapt to the former in recent years, partly to find a balance (the United States is still viewed favorably by the population, especially by compared to China, which is considered a tyrant by some in the country). Importantly, the Philippines and China have a common dispute over the Spratly Islands in the waters of the Pacific Ocean which are part of a crucial trade route for goods moving between Africa, South Asia East and Southeast Asia by air and sea. Any escalation seems far-fetched, but if it happened it would likely be the result of tensions between Beijing and Washington rather than a decision made in Manila.

But the election still matters to us and to the rest of the democratic world in another, more subtle, yet important sense; the phenomenon of certain families dominating the political landscapes and destinies of their countries is global. Perhaps the best descriptive term for capturing it may come 11,000 km away, in Canada (a country Duterte’s government has clashed with in recent years). Canadian professors André Turcotte, Jon H Pammett and Lawrence LeDuc coined a term that best describes this trend in a book that bears it in the title: Dynasties and interludes. The concept of non-royal dynasties – certain families ruling their countries permanently or intermittently in a manner akin to monarchy – is almost universal. Throughout the world, many countries have been or are ruled by successive members of the same families. Many of them are democracies (in addition to Canada, we can also include Botswana, Ghana, India, Japan, Kenya, Singapore, and the United States), others are not ( Haiti, North Korea and Syria). Still others fall somewhere in between (Bangladesh and Pakistan). In Libya’s upcoming elections, many are looking to Saif Gaddafi, son of the late Muammar Gaddafi, as the country’s potential leader.

While it’s true that individuals tend to follow the same career paths as their parents or other close relatives (1.7 to 2.7 times more likely according to one study), with politics the stakes are clearly high. because of the implications for all of us. Perhaps one of the most glaring lessons from the Philippines is that increased internet penetration does not mean access to useful or reliable information, and history can be erased (especially when independent journalism is removed). The unfolding of events in the Philippines is a warning of how history can be brushed aside, especially in the age of digital media. During the campaign, many viral posts actively re-wrote the narrative of the country’s martial law period and repainted it as a golden age of growth and stability that benefited all Filipinos, not only to the Marcos family. All societies are vulnerable to variations in these distortions.

Social media companies, especially Facebook, the most popular app in the Philippines, have a warped incentive to keep people active no matter how inaccurate the content being shared. Indeed, they are complicit in the rewriting of entire stories. As former Facebook data engineer Francis Haugen showed in his 2021 leaks, the company, which has since bizarrely renamed itself Meta, is intentionally profiting from political polarization online because it’s the kind of content that generates the most activity. An essential component of civic education is to produce a skeptical electorate. Yet, as news gets faster and faster, social media has become tools for targeted campaigns to channel specific falsehoods to specific types of voters likely to reach them. But regulating these platforms risks overcorrecting and silencing dissenting voices.

The answer lies in voter education. It places the responsibility on my profession, political science, as well as other social sciences dealing with accurate representations of the past and present, to have an education and research program that strives to be objective, nuanced and accessible. Above all, any viable democracy requires a set of facts shared among citizens so that they can make informed decisions.

The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Mail & Guardian.

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Flag Honors Luzerne County Man Killed in Forgotten War https://faaeeantrapologia.com/flag-honors-luzerne-county-man-killed-in-forgotten-war/ Sun, 15 May 2022 06:41:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/flag-honors-luzerne-county-man-killed-in-forgotten-war/ On display at the Plymouth Historical Society is a 45-star banner bearing the name of Julius Weil, who fell at San Juan Hill PLYMOUTH – There’s probably no one living in the United States who really remembers when the flag had 45 stars, as it did between 1896 and 1908. Similarly, the Spanish-American War of […]]]>

On display at the Plymouth Historical Society is a 45-star banner bearing the name of Julius Weil, who fell at San Juan Hill

PLYMOUTH – There’s probably no one living in the United States who really remembers when the flag had 45 stars, as it did between 1896 and 1908.

Similarly, the Spanish-American War of 1898, which lasted three months, today accounts for only a few paragraphs in the country’s textbooks, with just under 400 American soldiers killed, around 1,600 wounded and slightly more. 2,000 deaths from disease.

While the result established American power in the Caribbean for generations, the war lives on in our national memory mostly, perhaps, for the bravery of the volunteer Rough Riders – including second-in-command Theodore Roosevelt – and their legendary charge. on the hill of San Juan in Cuba, one of the decisive battles of the conflict.

Among the 144 Americans killed in this battle was Julius B. Weil of Plymouth.

His memory and name lives on today at the Plymouth Historical Society, thanks to a donation from a man from Bucks County.

One of the most significant items on display among the society’s collection of military artifacts is a 45-star flag that belonged to a group of veterans named Weil.

Similar to a post in the VFW or the American Legion – or earlier Civil War groups – Julius Weil Camp No. 141, the Hispanic American Veterans, brought together those who had served the nation in arms.

His name is printed on the flag, making this version of Old Glory particularly rare, said Steve Kondrad, chairman of the historical society’s board.

“Camp didn’t last long. The last one I found was in 1905,” Kondrad said. “After that, it looks like they broke up.”

The flag was donated to the society by a Quakertown man, who neatly folded it into a drawer.

“He was just glad someone wanted him,” Kondrad said.

Kondrad believes the flag was flown at camp meetings at the old armory that once stood on Gaylord Avenue, not far from where the historical society now stands.

According to contemporary newspaper reports, Weil was 27 when he was killed by Mauser rifle fire on July 1, 1898 in Siboney, Cuba. A clipping of this article can be read with this story on timesleader.com.

Weil had been ‘one of Plymouth’s most prominent young men’, the article says, the son of Max Weil, who ran a meat market in the borough.

Kondrad said the Weil name has been known for generations, including a later Dr. Weil and a women’s store under the family name.

Of course, the flag is just one of many treasured memorabilia kept and displayed by society. They range from Civil War photos and relics to items left at the Healing Wall when this monument to American Vietnam War dead visited Plymouth in 2019.

According to the company’s Facebook page, last week they took possession of military items that had belonged to two Plymouth servicemen: PFC Frank De Franco and PFC Fred Mahoney, both of whom made the ultimate sacrifice for our country during the Second World War.

For more information about the company and its activities, visit the group’s Facebook page; its website, https://www.plymouthistoricalsocietyluzernecopa.org/, or call 570-779-5840. Its archives and museum are located at 115 Gaylord Ave.

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Nigerian woman who led a mass uprising in Cuba, by Owei Lakemfa https://faaeeantrapologia.com/nigerian-woman-who-led-a-mass-uprising-in-cuba-by-owei-lakemfa/ Fri, 13 May 2022 20:37:39 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/nigerian-woman-who-led-a-mass-uprising-in-cuba-by-owei-lakemfa/ The uprising began in full on Sunday, November 5, 1943 at 8 p.m. when Carlota set fire to the places of torture and detention, the house and the mill of the slave master. With sharp machetes, she and her followers attacked the overseers and their assistants, killing them… Within hours, the insurgents had overthrown the […]]]>

The uprising began in full on Sunday, November 5, 1943 at 8 p.m. when Carlota set fire to the places of torture and detention, the house and the mill of the slave master. With sharp machetes, she and her followers attacked the overseers and their assistants, killing them… Within hours, the insurgents had overthrown the mayor of Matanzas, Julian Luis Alfonso Sole, who was also the owner of the local sugar factory. They also invaded five plantations.

Carlota Lukumi, a Yoruba from Nigeria, was about ten years old when slavers abducted her about two hundred years ago. She was one of approximately 12.5 million Africans abducted. She survived the dehumanizing passage of the Atlantic Ocean into slavery, during which at least 2.5 million people died. She was sold as a slave to work in the sugar and cotton plantations of the Cuban province of Matanzas.

As in almost all cases, her original name was lost as she was given a new name, Carlota. His surname, Lukumi, comes from the habit of Yoruba slaves, in recognition of their kinship, calling themselves ‘Olukumi’, which means my close friend. It was very much like the Argentine international doctor, Ernesto Guevera, referring to himself as “Che” (Buddy) and it becoming part of his name.

More than 600,000 slaves were taken to Cuba in the 19th century and subjected to inhuman and backbreaking labor in the fields. The Spanish colonialists treated slaves as beasts of burden. Their living conditions were quite harsh and some of the slaves thought the best option was the overthrow of the slave masters, who were also the Spanish colonialists. Uprisings like these were quite bloody and brutal and in almost every case associated with masculinity. But Carlota and another woman of African descent, Fermnina, decided to lead a revolution to overthrow the system. They formed a triumvirate with another African slave, Evaristo, and began mobilization in July and August 1843.

With the Triunvirato and Acana mills as their base, they employed the use of talking drums, which a number of slaves had learned themselves. Slave owners assumed that talking drums were ways for slaves to remember their ancestors, whereas these were war drums.

Unfortunately, part of the plan leaked and Fermina was exposed as a rebel planning an insurrection. On August 2, she was arrested, tortured and detained. But the slave masters did not realize that this was only the tip of the iceberg and that the insurrection, coordinated by Carlota, was rumbling like a volcano.

Three months later, on November 3, the insurgents, led by Carlota, moved from their base at Triunvirato Mill to Acana Mill, where they liberated Fermina and freed the slaves.

Carlota’s early capture and execution, rather than deterring the insurgents, galvanized them for greater action. While she carried out the full insurgency for a single day, the revolt lasted a year; the biggest against the slave owners in Cuba.

The uprising began in full on Sunday, November 5, 1943 at 8 p.m. when Carlota set fire to the places of torture and detention, the house and the mill of the slave master. With sharpened machetes, she and her followers attacked the overseers and their assistants, killing them. Some witnesses testified that Carlota personally seized and killed her overseer’s daughter. Within hours, the insurgents had overthrown the mayor of Matanzas, Julian Luis Alfonso Sole, who also owned the local sugar mill. They also invaded five plantations.

It was a very brutal uprising, with neither side taking any prisoners. When Carlota was captured, she was promptly put to death on November 6, 1843. It is not known how she was executed, but a popular claim by witnesses was that: “Repressive forces tied her to horses sent to run in opposite directions in order to completely destroy her body so that she is forever unrecognizable.

Carlota’s early capture and execution, rather than deterring the insurgents, galvanized them for greater action. While she carried out the full insurgency for a single day, the revolt lasted a year; the biggest against the slave owners in Cuba.

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Fermina and seven others were shot in March 1844. This year became known as the “Year of the Lashes” because angry slave owners and the Spanish armed forces massacred many Cubans of ancestry African, regardless of gender and status; slaves and freed men and women.

The uprising had an international echo. A few days after the start of the rebellion, an American warship, a navy corvette, the Vandalia, docked in Havana. Its commander, Rear Admiral Chauncey brought a letter of solidarity to Leopold O’Donnell, the Captain General of Cuba, offering American assistance in crushing the “Afro-Cuban” rebellion. Mr. Campbell, United States Consul in Havana, accompanied Rear Admiral Chauncey to the official ceremony where the letter was presented. It revealed that as early as the 1880s, and even before the Berlin Conference of 1844-45 where Africa was divided into colonies, Western Europeans and Americans were working together to dominate the world. This was also evident in their support for apartheid South Africa in Angola, Namibia and South Africa. It is still played out today in the Russian-Ukrainian war.

Carlota’s uprising occurring after the Haitian Revolution of August 22, 1791 to January 1, 1804, in which slaves faced the colonialists, alongside the British and French armies, snatched victory, freed all slaves and declared the independence, led to the dismantling of slaves and colonial systems in the 19th century.

In 2015, the memorial site hosted the 40th commemoration of “Operation Carlota”. Carlota Lukumi seems to have lived the last three centuries, as the leader of the 19th century slave uprising, in the UNESCO slave memorial of the last century, and in the 40th commemoration of Operation Carlota in the 21st century.

Carlota has become not only a symbol of the strength of the Cuban woman, but also a symbol of resistance and resilience.

When Western-backed apartheid South Africa invaded Angola in 1974, President Agostinho Neto sent an SOS message to Cuba on November 3. The positive response came two days later: “The Communist Party of Cuba made its decision without hesitation. The Cubans’ choice of November 5 to meet the Angolan demand was symbolic, as it reminded them of November 5, 1883, the day Carlota began her revolt. For them, it was time for Cuba to show its gratitude for the fundamental role that Cubans of African descent, like Carlota and General Antonio Maceo, played in their liberation. Maceo, known as the “Titan of the Bronz” because of his skin and his bravery in war, was the second in command of the Cuban Army of Liberation from colonial rule.

As Cuba sent tens of thousands of troops to Africa to halt the march of apartheid on the continent, including its invasion of various African states, its then leader, Fidel Castro, named it “Operación Carlota “(Operation Carlota) in honor of Carlota Lukumi. . The decisive Cuban military victory over the apartheid armed forces not only forced the racists out of Angola, but also led to the independence of Namibia and South Africa.

With Operation Carlota, Cubans linked not only their ancestral past to Africa, but also the ideals of the Cuban Revolution to the total liberation of Africa.

In 1991, as part of the UNESCO Slave Route project, a memorial honoring Carlota and the heroic slaves who fought for freedom, was erected on the site of the Triunvirato plantation. where the revolt began.

In 2015, the memorial site hosted the 40th commemoration of “Operation Carlota”. Carlota Lukumi seems to have lived the last three centuries, as the leader of the 19th century slave uprising, in the UNESCO slave memorial of the last century, and in the 40th commemoration of Operation Carlota in the 21st century.

Owei Lakemfa, former General Secretary of African Workers, is a human rights activist, journalist and author.


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This Spanish sentence sums Boris Johnson up in one word – The REAL Scottish Politics https://faaeeantrapologia.com/this-spanish-sentence-sums-boris-johnson-up-in-one-word-the-real-scottish-politics/ Wed, 11 May 2022 17:57:21 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/this-spanish-sentence-sums-boris-johnson-up-in-one-word-the-real-scottish-politics/ THEY don’t call it treacherous Albion for nothing, and likewise there is a reason why Spanish speakers use the phrase “hijo de la Gran Bretaña” (son of Britain) in much the same way and with roughly the same meaning as the English term “son of ab****. This is because Britain has a reputation abroad for […]]]>

THEY don’t call it treacherous Albion for nothing, and likewise there is a reason why Spanish speakers use the phrase “hijo de la Gran Bretaña” (son of Britain) in much the same way and with roughly the same meaning as the English term “son of ab****.

This is because Britain has a reputation abroad for being untrustworthy, underhanded and deceitful in its dealings with other countries. The British nationalist self-image of Britain characterized by fair play and incorruptibility is a fantasy shared by no one else.

This week we witnessed another reason why a Spanish speaker might wish to spit hijo de la Gran Bretaña in disgust and anger. The UK government is reportedly considering ripping up the Northern Irish Protocol – requiring checks on goods entering Northern Ireland from other UK countries – because the DUP is in an all-powerful sulk after losing the Stormont election last week last for the benefit of Sinn Fein and threatening to refuse to enter government with a Sinn Fein prime minister.

The DUP backed Brexit in hopes it would bring down the Good Friday Agreement and create a hard border on the island of Ireland, which they say would make Irish reunification less likely. Instead, they discovered that parading around in sashes and bowler hats while waving Union flags and proclaiming undying loyalty to the Crown and Westminster is no defense against being victimized. of that infamous perfidy of Albion.

Despite Tory assurances that if the DUP backed them in getting the Brexit deal done, the UK would never agree to customs checks on ferry crossings between Northern Ireland and Britain, the Gran Bretaña hijo in Downing Street went ahead and did just that. .

In a bid to appease DUP and Tory backbench MPs, Michael Gove today said ‘no options are on the table’ and added he was ‘super cool’ with the threats to renege on an international treaty agreement which the British government itself negotiated and signed. until. It would explode what little goodwill remains in Europe towards the UK and risk sparking a trade war with the EU amid a cost of living crisis and with prices already soaring, plunging many families in poverty and hardship.

The truth is that the DUP and other parties opposed to protocol lost recent elections, and there is a clear majority in the newly elected Stormont for parties that support protocol – 52 members in the 90-seat assembly support the protocol against only 38 who oppose it.

The DUP and its unionist allies lost a democratic election, but do not want to accept the verdict of the people. A British government that respected democracy and the will of the people of Northern Ireland as expressed at the ballot box would slap the DUP instead of pandering to the undemocratic demands of the sore losers. But instead we have a conservative government of hijos de la Gran Bretaña.

The Good Friday Agreement must be protected in order to secure peace in Northern Ireland. However, we have a Conservative government that is threatening to tear up a protocol that is only needed because of the Conservatives’ decision to leave the European single market and customs union for partisan reasons and in doing so not only to destroying a key principle of the Good Friday Agreement, but also demonstrating to the world that the UK cannot be trusted to adhere to international treaties which it itself negotiated and signed.

This article is an excerpt from today’s REAL Scottish Politics newsletter, which is emailed at 7pm every weekday with a summary of the day’s top stories and exclusive analysis from the Wee Ginger Dug.

To receive our full newsletter, including this analysis, straight to your inbox, click here and tick the box for REAL Scottish Politics

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What is the Battle of Saint-Louis? https://faaeeantrapologia.com/what-is-the-battle-of-saint-louis/ Tue, 10 May 2022 00:06:07 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/what-is-the-battle-of-saint-louis/ Long before the Gateway Arch welcomed visitors to St. Louis, a tower and trench in the same area were used to keep visitors out. In 1780, Saint-Louis was a modest fur trading village under Spanish rule. Its local leader, Fernando de Leyba, was a Spanish army officer whose cold approach to governance made him unpopular […]]]>

Long before the Gateway Arch welcomed visitors to St. Louis, a tower and trench in the same area were used to keep visitors out. In 1780, Saint-Louis was a modest fur trading village under Spanish rule. Its local leader, Fernando de Leyba, was a Spanish army officer whose cold approach to governance made him unpopular among the townspeople. De Leyba’s role at St. Louis was already a challenge. And then the British invaded.

On May 26, 1780, the hamlet became the scene of an improbable but crucial battle during the War of Independence: the Battle of Saint-Louis. Earlier that spring, de Leyba had learned of a British plan to attack the city and take control of the Mississippi River and surrounding valley. For this mission, the British recruited local Native American tribes to bomb St. Louis on their behalf. Without forts or defensive structures, de Leyba recognized that the city would be particularly vulnerable. He therefore quickly considered the construction of several limestone towers. Due to time and budget constraints, however, only one was built, Fort San Carlos. It was three stories high and about 30 feet wide, standing approximately on the current ground of the Ark. For additional protection, de Leyba also had a 2,000 meter trench constructed, from which the militia could defend the village.

When the British force of Native Americans charged from the north that afternoon, the battle was on. As the clash unfolded, St. Louis Militia began firing cannons at the invaders to stem their advance. The sound and force of the cannons shocked Native Americans, some of whom later referred to the tower as a “house of thunder.” The invaders quickly recognized that they were not equipped to withstand the guns and withdrew. Although the fighting only lasted a few hours that afternoon, 21 St. Louis residents are believed to have died and another 25 were captured.

Even the victory was not enough to repair de Leyba’s reputation among the locals. They blamed him for the loss of their livestock and crops, which were set on fire by the retreating Native Americans. De Leyba was incredulous. He had gone bankrupt preparing for battle by spending his own money on supplies and defense. Only weeks after the battle, de Leyba died destitute.

Today, this little-known part of local history has received its due, thanks to the book The Battle of St. Louis, the Attack on Cahokia, and the American Revolution in the West by Stephen L. Kling Jr., Kristine Sjostrom and Marysia T. Lopez, plus the 2021 documentary by Paul Schenkman house of thunder. As Schenkman noted upon the film’s release, the battle was “much bigger than anyone had ever imagined”.


By the ballpark

A historical marker commemorating the site of the Battle of St. Louis can be found at the corner of Walnut and Downtown Broadway, outside the Hilton at Ballpark. The plaque, donated in 1946 by the General Society of the Sons of the Revolution, reads:

Near this place stood Fort San Carlos erected in 1780. It was attacked in May [26], 1780 by the British and Indians, and successfully defended by the Spanish garrison under Captain Fernando de Leyba. This victory prevented Britain from gaining control of the Mississippi Valley in the final years of the American Revolution. War.

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Crews work until 2nd night after Cuba hotel explosion kills 27 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/crews-work-until-2nd-night-after-cuba-hotel-explosion-kills-27/ Sun, 08 May 2022 04:18:45 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/crews-work-until-2nd-night-after-cuba-hotel-explosion-kills-27/ Rescue teams remove debris from the site of a deadly explosion that destroyed the five-star Saratoga hotel, in Havana, Cuba, Friday, May 6, 2022. A powerful explosion apparently caused by a natural gas leak killed at least 18 people, including a pregnant woman and a child, and dozens injured on Friday when it blew through […]]]>

Rescue teams remove debris from the site of a deadly explosion that destroyed the five-star Saratoga hotel, in Havana, Cuba, Friday, May 6, 2022. A powerful explosion apparently caused by a natural gas leak killed at least 18 people, including a pregnant woman and a child, and dozens injured on Friday when it blew through the exterior walls of the luxury hotel in the heart of the Cuban capital.  (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Rescue teams remove debris from the site of a deadly explosion that destroyed the five-star Saratoga hotel, in Havana, Cuba, Friday, May 6, 2022. A powerful explosion apparently caused by a natural gas leak killed at least 18 people, including a pregnant woman and a child, and dozens injured on Friday when it blew through the exterior walls of the luxury hotel in the heart of the Cuban capital. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

PA

Crews worked for a second night searching for victims of a hotel explosion that killed at least 27 people in the Cuban capital and left more than a dozen missing among the rubble.

Hotel Saratoga, a 96-room luxury hotel in Old Havana, was completing renovations when an apparent gas leak caused a massive explosion on Friday.

Just steps from Cuba’s capital, the Saratoga’s facade was sheared off, burying workers inside and apparently passers-by outside under concrete and twisted metal. The explosion occurred in the late morning when the streets and square in front of the majestic hotel were reportedly full of pedestrians.

On Saturday evening, Dr. Julio Guerra Izquierdo, head of hospital services at the Ministry of Health, brought the toll to 27 dead and 81 injured. The dead included four children and a pregnant woman. Spanish President Pedro Sánchez said via Twitter that a Spanish tourist was among the dead and another Spaniard was seriously injured.

Some 37 people remained hospitalized, according to the Ministry of Health.

Earlier on Saturday afternoon, a representative from Grupo de Turismo Gaviota SA, which owns the hotel, said 13 of its employees were still missing. Governor Reinaldo García Zapata said Saturday night that 19 families had reported loved ones missing and rescue efforts would continue.

At least one survivor was found early Saturday in the shattered ruins.

Authorities said the cause of the explosion was still under investigation, but believed it was caused by a gas leak. A large crane hoisted a charred tanker truck out of the rubble on Saturday.

The explosion is another blow to the country’s crucial tourism industry.

Crews worked actively to clear surrounding streets and by Saturday evening heavy foot traffic had resumed. Some nearby buildings were also heavily damaged by the blast, which blew out windows and shook walls.

Even before the coronavirus pandemic kept tourists away from Cuba, the country was grappling with tougher sanctions imposed by former US President Donald Trump and keeping the Biden administration in place. These limited visits by American tourists to the islands and restricted remittances from Cubans in the United States to their families in Cuba.

Tourism had started to pick up earlier this year, but the war in Ukraine deflated a boom in Russian visitors, who made up nearly a third of tourists who arrived in Cuba last year.

Attention has started to shift to an official visit by Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who arrived in the capital on Saturday evening. López Obrador was wrapping up a five-country tour that started in Central America.

Cuban President Miguel Díaz-Canel visited Mexico during Independence Day celebrations last year. López Obrador recently spoke out against the US government’s apparent intention to exclude Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua from the Summit of the Americas it will host in Los Angeles in June.

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Why do Spain and Portugal get special energy treatment? https://faaeeantrapologia.com/why-do-spain-and-portugal-get-special-energy-treatment/ Tue, 03 May 2022 07:35:45 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/why-do-spain-and-portugal-get-special-energy-treatment/ Placeholder while loading article actions Spain and Portugal have pulled off a diplomatic coup with a new alliance to tackle soaring energy prices. Not against Putin’s Russia, which has its boot on the trachea of ​​European gas importers, but against their fellow partners in the European Union. In the short term, this will protect consumers […]]]>
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Spain and Portugal have pulled off a diplomatic coup with a new alliance to tackle soaring energy prices. Not against Putin’s Russia, which has its boot on the trachea of ​​European gas importers, but against their fellow partners in the European Union.

In the short term, this will protect consumers in Spain and Portugal, whose anger over inflation spilled onto the streets during the May Day protests. But in the long term, the agreement risks aggravating the visible cracks in European unity.

The two countries won a so-called ‘Iberian exception’ last week that will separate the peninsula’s electricity prices, which have wide access to renewable energy sources, from the soaring cost of natural gas on which it depends. the rest of the block. The resulting price cap of up to 50 euros ($52.55) per megawatt-hour would halve the electricity bills of 40% of consumers on the peninsula. Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Costa called it a “great achievement”.

At first glance, this measure – presented as a “temporary” emergency tool – is no different from the tens of billions of euros spent by several individual European economies to protect vulnerable consumers and businesses against higher energy bills after Covid. . But it reveals deeper energy divisions within the EU as the bloc fights to keep a unified stance against Russia.

On the one hand, it is a visible brake on the EU’s desire to unify energy markets at a time when regulators are advocating adjustments such as hedging strategies or vouchers rather than more intervention radical. It transforms the peninsula into an “energy island”, separated from the rest of the union. Spain and Portugal have a very weak interconnection with the EU market, but this decision sets back years in terms of integration.

The Iberian exception also highlights a reshuffling of power dynamics within the EU, with the influence of the German economic “model” weakened by its dependence on cheap Russian gas. Brussels is now experiencing increased French leadership. Spain and Portugal, once derided as stereotypical “Club Med” economies, could see their post-Covid growth rebound and diverge from the rest of the continent, which is experiencing a slowdown due to energy disruptions from Russia.

Redrawing the North-South divide along energy lines could have deeper ramifications, says Ramon Mateo Escobar, director of consultancy BeBartlet. If Iberian electricity prices become artificially low compared to their neighbours, he says, investments and business could change accordingly. Spain and Portugal could use their influence to influence other countries to push for more fiscal stimulus in the form of Covid funds – the model promoted by the new EU power couple, France and Italy.

The optimistic view is that the Iberian exception could offer initiatives for the rest of the EU to follow. Spain wants to be a bigger player in alternative energy sources, encouraging investment in renewable energy and storage. The two Iberian neighbors could lead the way in energy saving and subsidies, for example by advocating for energy-efficient buildings.

But the long-term risks also increase. Consumers are numb to the cost of Putin’s war, and subsidies like this will be hard to cut. If this is the start of EU members being encouraged to go it alone, Putin may also find it easier to play divide and conquer, according to Simone Tagliapietra of Bruegel, a Brussels think tank. Cracks in the unity of sanctions are already showing.

With the energy storm unlikely to subside any time soon, closer European integration and more common spending would indeed provide a very useful umbrella. Given the task facing Europe – from the cost of overhauling its energy ties to strengthening its ability to defend itself militarily – it will be difficult to find shelter in energy islands.

More from Bloomberg Opinion:

Macron’s victory is an opportunity for France and the EU: Lionel Laurent

Putin’s gas strategy offers Germany only bad and worse choices: Javier Blas

• Elon Musk is the wrong leader for Twitter’s vital role: Timothy O’Brien

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board or of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Lionel Laurent is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the European Union and France. He previously worked at Reuters and Forbes.

More stories like this are available at bloomberg.com/opinion

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Wimbledon ban of Russian and Belarusian players ‘very unfair’, says Rafael Nadal https://faaeeantrapologia.com/wimbledon-ban-of-russian-and-belarusian-players-very-unfair-says-rafael-nadal/ Sun, 01 May 2022 15:15:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/wimbledon-ban-of-russian-and-belarusian-players-very-unfair-says-rafael-nadal/ Rafael Nadal has called the Wimbledon ban of Russian and Belarusian players “very unfair” as the ATP ponder their response. Wimbledon officials reiterated their stance last week, saying a government directive about invading Ukraine left them with no viable alternative but to refuse entries from players from both countries. There has been some support for […]]]>

Rafael Nadal has called the Wimbledon ban of Russian and Belarusian players “very unfair” as the ATP ponder their response.

Wimbledon officials reiterated their stance last week, saying a government directive about invading Ukraine left them with no viable alternative but to refuse entries from players from both countries.

There has been some support for Wimbledon’s stance, particularly from Ukrainians within tennis, but the reaction has been largely negative, with the ATP and WTA both deciding whether or not to impose sanctions. .

Speaking ahead of his return to action at the Madrid Open, Nadal told reporters in the Spanish capital: “I think it’s very unfair (to) my Russian tennis friends, my colleagues. It’s not their fault what’s happening right now with the war.

I think it’s very unfair (on) my Russian tennis mates, my colleagues. It’s not their fault what’s going on right now with the war

Action against Wimbledon and previous lawn tournaments run by the Lawn Tennis Association could include the removal of ranking points.

Nadal, who is a member of the ATP Players Council, added: “The 2,000 points, every time we go to Grand Slams, they are really important and we have to go to these tournaments. So we will have to see the measures which we will take.

“At the end of the day, what happens in our game, it doesn’t matter when we can see so many people dying and suffering and seeing the bad situation they are going through in Ukraine.”

Nadal is playing his first tournament in six weeks after suffering a stress fracture of a rib (PA)

Nadal is playing his first tournament in six weeks after suffering a stress fracture of a rib in Indian Wells in March.

His loss to Taylor Fritz in the final, when he was clearly physically hampered, ended his 20-game winning streak to start the season.

Nadal is catching up to get in top physical shape for Roland-Garros time, and said: “Speaking of injury, I’m healed, I feel good. Talking about my tennis game and my preparations, well, that’s a whole different story.

I’m recovered, I feel good

“Anyone who has broken a rib knows how limiting it is, very painful, especially the first few weeks. I couldn’t do anything without a lot of difficulty, even falling asleep because of the pain.

“I’ve improved from when I arrived here but I still have ups and downs because it’s been a long time without being in these kinds of situations and it’s going to be a tough week for sure.”

At the BMW Open in Munich, Dane Holger Rune, who turned 19 on Friday, claimed his first ATP Tour title when opponent Botic Van De Zandschulp retired through injury after just seven games.

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Real Madrid’s move for Chelsea’s Antonio Rudiger is the perfect deal for the Spanish giants https://faaeeantrapologia.com/real-madrids-move-for-chelseas-antonio-rudiger-is-the-perfect-deal-for-the-spanish-giants/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 09:14:47 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/real-madrids-move-for-chelseas-antonio-rudiger-is-the-perfect-deal-for-the-spanish-giants/ Real Madrid’s Antonio Rudiger move is their perfect deal: firming up their defence, unleashing the versatility of David Alaba… and keeping free funds for Kylian Mbappe – so here’s how they could line up Antonio Rudiger will leave Chelsea at the end of his contract this season Real Madrid are set to sign the German […]]]>

Real Madrid’s Antonio Rudiger move is their perfect deal: firming up their defence, unleashing the versatility of David Alaba… and keeping free funds for Kylian Mbappe – so here’s how they could line up

  • Antonio Rudiger will leave Chelsea at the end of his contract this season
  • Real Madrid are set to sign the German international in the summer window
  • It’s a smart move for Real, with the deal impacting the squad

Real Madrid believe they have the perfect combination with Antonio Rudiger – a fiercely competitive winner and a free transfer.

The club see the Chelsea man as this summer’s David Alaba with the Austrian combining those same qualities in last year’s pre-season.

With some clubs focusing on costly additions to the center of their defense (Sevilla duo Jules Kounde and Diego Carlos are likely to provoke a mini bidding war this summer), and Barcelona looking for a free transfer but are focusing on ball-playing centre-backs such as Andreas Christensen, Madrid want someone who fits a frugal spending plan for almost everyone, not Kylian Mbappe, and someone they believe has the winning mentality of the club.

Real Madrid set to sign centre-back Antonio Rudiger on a free transfer this summer

The centre-back will leave Chelsea when his contract expires at the end of the season

The centre-back will leave Chelsea when his contract expires at the end of the season

Rudiger's arrival would help Madrid unlock David Alaba's versatility

Rudiger’s arrival would help Madrid unlock David Alaba’s versatility

REAL MADRID 2022-23

What Carlo Ancelotti’s squad could look like next season:

GK: Courtois (Lunin)

DEFENSE: Carvajal, Militao, Rudiger, Alaba

(Lucas), (Nacho), (Mendy)

MIDFIELDER : Modric, Casemiro, Kroos

(Camavinga), (Chouameni), (Alaba)

OFFENSIVE: Mbappe, Benzema, Vinicius

(Valverde), (Rodrygo).

The bonus for them will also be to unleash the versatility of David Alaba and avoid scenarios like this tonight at the Etihad when, potentially, they are without Casemiro and don’t really have an obvious option for him. replace.

Alaba is more than happy in a midfield role and he can play at left-back, so with Rudiger able to link up with Eder Militao, he could now replace both the Brazilian midfielder and Ferland Mendy who have struggled with fitness this season.

Another freebie means all funds go to Mbappe’s coffers. At least it will be like that if he decides to take what could end up being a record signing from Real Madrid and not Paris Saint Germain. Madrid remain confident that he will.

Madrid will also buy a midfielder. Spending big on Mbappe is likely to rule out a successful bid for Borussia Dortmund’s English midfielder Jude Bellingham.

Madrid have a good relationship with Dortmund, who have loaned out Achraf Hakimi and Reinier Jesus in the past, but 22-year-old Monaco midfielder Aurelien Tchouameni is likely to be more accessible.

The German club won’t need to sell after offloading Erling Haaland to Manchester City and Bellingham has a contract until 2025.

Massive spending in midfield will not be the priority if Rudiger arrives and there is the possibility of advancing Alaba. There’s a lot of confidence in Eduardo Camavinga’s ability to keep improving as well.

PSG's Kylian Mbappe remains a target for Madrid but his future beyond this season is unclear

PSG’s Kylian Mbappe remains a target for Madrid but his future beyond this season is unclear

Real have holes in their squad as seen in the potential impact of Casemiro's absence against Manchester City in their Champions League semi-final

Real have holes in their squad as seen in the potential impact of Casemiro’s absence against Manchester City in their Champions League semi-final

Midfielder Eduardo Camavinga is a player Real Madrid have high hopes for in the future

Midfielder Eduardo Camavinga is a player Real Madrid have high hopes for in the future

He is part of a group of young players, along with Vinicius, Fede Valverde and Rodrygo who are seen as the club’s future. Their youth means that experience is another thing valued in new recruits.

Rudiger is a player who left Germany when he was only 22 years old. He won a Champions League and convinced three of the best coaches in Europe: Joachim Low, Hansi Flick and Thomas Tuchel.

It’s not a bet, it’s just another in a long line of shrewd moves in the market. Eden Hazard and Luka Jovic aside, it really feels like Madrid haven’t set foot with signings for a long time.

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15 rare vintage images of Nelson’s Royal Navy flagship, HMS Victory https://faaeeantrapologia.com/15-rare-vintage-images-of-nelsons-royal-navy-flagship-hms-victory/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 03:55:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/15-rare-vintage-images-of-nelsons-royal-navy-flagship-hms-victory/ Included are Le Redoutable, a 74-gun Temeraire-class ship of the French Navy engaged with Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson’s flagship, HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Four different incredible engravings which depict the wound and the death of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson on the after deck of his flagship at the Battle of […]]]>

Included are Le Redoutable, a 74-gun Temeraire-class ship of the French Navy engaged with Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson’s flagship, HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Four different incredible engravings which depict the wound and the death of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson on the after deck of his flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar fought between the Royal Navy and the combined fleets of France and Spain during the Napoleonic War of the Third Coalition on 21 October 1805 off Cape Trafalgar, Spain and ‘HMS Victory’ being towed to Gibraltar with Nelson’s corps afterwards.

You will also see an earlier image of HMS Victory, flagship of Admiral Sir John Jervis, delivering a full broadside to the Spanish ship Salvador del Mundo in the Battle of Cape St. Vincent during the French Revolutionary Wars on February 14, 1797 near Cape St. Vincent, Portugal. .

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