united states – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 20:59:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png united states – FAAEE Antrapologia http://faaeeantrapologia.com/ 32 32 Pakistani minister says OIC meeting is ‘a matter of national security’ https://faaeeantrapologia.com/pakistani-minister-says-oic-meeting-is-a-matter-of-national-security/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 20:59:58 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/pakistani-minister-says-oic-meeting-is-a-matter-of-national-security/ DUBAI: To offset Washington’s ban on energy imports from Russia, imposed in response to the war in Ukraine, US officials have quietly made overtures to an antagonistic pair of oil producers, Iran and Venezuela. It is too early to tell whether the unorthodox attempt to close the oil supply gap will bear fruit. The main […]]]>

DUBAI: To offset Washington’s ban on energy imports from Russia, imposed in response to the war in Ukraine, US officials have quietly made overtures to an antagonistic pair of oil producers, Iran and Venezuela. It is too early to tell whether the unorthodox attempt to close the oil supply gap will bear fruit.

The main result of the administration’s efforts so far has been a pushback from Republicans and Democrats, as well as stark warnings from opposition groups in Venezuela and Iran about the dangers of hasty overtures to the regimes in Caracas and Tehran.

US President Joe Biden announced a decision to block all Russian oil, natural gas and coal imports on March 8, hoping to put additional economic pressure on Moscow to end its invasion of the Ukraine, which began on February 24.

Western nations have condemned what they see as an unprovoked attack on a sovereign nation and have responded with sanctions targeting Russia’s financial infrastructure and its wealthiest individuals.

Moscow said its “special military operation” aims to protect the safety of Russia and Russian-speaking residents of Ukraine’s Donbass region.

The US ban on energy imports could remove more than 10 million barrels of oil per day from Western markets. Last year, the United States alone imported nearly 700,000 barrels a day of crude oil and refined petroleum products from Russia. These will now cease.

“This measure will deprive Russia of billions of dollars in revenue from American drivers and consumers each year,” the White House said when announcing the ban.

Crude prices were already rising sharply due to increased global energy demand linked to the easing of COVID-19 related restrictions in many countries. Today, the war in Ukraine has sent prices skyrocketing, with repercussions on the prices of imported foodstuffs and consumer goods.

Analysts at JP Morgan and Bank of America predict that the disruption in Russian energy flows could push oil prices up to $185-$200 a barrel.

“Inflation will pick up in March and April as the ripple effects of the Russian-Ukrainian war push prices even higher at supermarkets, gas pumps and on utility bills,” predicted Bill Adams, Chief Economist of Comerica Bank, in a recent report.

For months, Republicans have blamed Biden and Democrats for soaring fuel prices, linking them to what they call the president’s “war on American energy.”

“Biden’s White House talking points on oil and gas appear to have been written by an 18-year-old intern following freshman socialism,” Republican Sen. Ted Cruz said.

Some analysts have argued that the higher prices before the Ukraine invasion were due to supply-demand mismatches related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Russia is the world’s third largest oil producer after the United States and Saudi Arabia. It provides about 25% of Europe’s oil and about 40% of its natural gas needs. If Europe follows the lead of the United States and bans all Russian energy imports without having alternatives in place, the effects could be economically devastating for the continent.

An increasingly anxious Joe Biden administration is courting two global outcasts in a bid to counter the growing energy crisis. (AFP)

Additional supply from Arab oil producers, including Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, could help offset some of the supply shortfall. However, several OPEC members, including Saudi Arabia, have already ruled out an increase in oil production.

Under these circumstances, the Biden administration is turning to some of the most unlikely candidates to fill the gap, like Iran and Venezuela, regimes long shunned by Washington and pressured by sanctions.

However, years of antagonism have left these two regimes in no mood to come to the rescue – unless sanctions relief and political goodwill are offered in return.

In Iran’s case, that would mean accelerating the relaunch of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, also known as the Iran nuclear deal, from which President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew the United States in May. 2018 and reimposed the sanctions against Tehran.

Following the embargo imposed by the United States, Iran, which pumped an average of 2.4 million barrels of oil per day in 2021, was unable to sell even half of this that it produces.

Former Venezuelan National Assembly speaker and opposition leader Juan Guaido speaks during a press conference at Los Palos Grandes square in Caracas on March 17, 2022. (AFP)

Although Tehran has cultivated close ties with Moscow in recent years – a process facilitated by overlapping political objectives in Syria, for example – it feels a whiff of opportunity offered by the Ukraine crisis to free itself from at least some US sanctions, according to political analysts. . Iranian officials have said they are ready to increase oil production as soon as nuclear negotiators in Vienna approve a renewed deal.

“The Islamic Republic of Iran is ready to increase its production and exports to pre-November 2018 levels,” Javad Owji, Iran’s Oil Minister, said recently, according to a report by the regime’s official IRNA news agency.

“It is up to the major consuming countries to take the necessary measures to maintain stability and calm in the oil market,” he added after a recent OPEC meeting, according to Shana, the ministry’s official agency.

“I promise to reach the highest oil export capacity within one to two months, as soon as the green light from Vienna is given.”

Opponents of the Iranian regime have urged the Biden administration not to relax its pressure on Tehran, which the United States considers a state sponsor of terrorism. Iran’s powerful Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, a key supporter of Hezbollah and other militant groups across the Middle East, plays a key role in the country’s oil sector.

US allies in the Middle East fear Washington’s rush to fill supply gaps in the global oil market could lead to a weak new nuclear deal that will allow Tehran to retain a large stockpile of enriched uranium, continue to expand its ballistic missile program and continue to arm its proxy militias in the region.

Envoys in Vienna are holding talks on a possible relaunch of the Iran nuclear deal. (AFP)

Closer to home, the Venezuelan government, sensing a similar opportunity offered by US outreach, has signaled that it is also ready and ready to boost oil production and help close the supply gap, in exchange for sanctions relief – much to the chagrin of the opposition.

“Venezuela’s doors are open to invest, produce oil, gas and provide oil and gas stability to the whole world, including the United States,” Nicolas Maduro, the president of Venezuela, said in comments. published on the website of the public oil company, PDVSA.

Venezuela, which has the world’s largest known oil reserves, has been under U.S. oil sanctions since 2019. They were imposed shortly after Maduro was re-elected in a vote widely believed to be rigged. His socialist regime is blamed by many for endemic corruption and economic mismanagement in Venezuela, which caused an estimated 4 million people to flee the country.

So it was an important development when a delegation of senior White House officials traveled to Caracas on March 5 to meet with Maduro. These were the first high-level talks between the countries in years.

Although details of the meeting have not been fully disclosed, the delegation is believed to have discussed measures to ease sanctions and help Venezuela increase oil production, sources close to the Wall Street Journal told The Wall Street Journal. folder.

Felix Plasencia, Maduro’s foreign minister, said US oil companies would be welcome to return to Venezuela, “if they accept that the only legitimate government in Venezuela is that led by President Nicolas Maduro.”

Venezuela, which has the world’s largest known oil reserves, has been under U.S. oil sanctions since 2019. They were imposed shortly after Maduro was re-elected in a vote widely believed to be rigged. (AFP)

In what appears to have been an act of good faith, two American prisoners, including a former oil executive, were released from Venezuelan custody following the visit and Maduro agreed to resume talks with the domestic opposition .

Nonetheless, Biden’s overtures to Caracas have proven unpopular in Washington, with even prominent Democrats questioning the wisdom of mending the fences with an authoritarian regime — and a Russian ally to boot.

“The democratic aspirations of the Venezuelan people, like the determination and courage of the Ukrainian people, are worth far more than a few thousand barrels of oil,” said Democratic Senator Bob Menendez, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

Republican Senator Marco Rubio said, “The White House offered to abandon those who sought freedom from Venezuela in exchange for an insignificant amount of oil.”

Other opponents of a possible thaw in relations with Caracas point out that it would take tens of billions of dollars and years of investment to increase oil production in Venezuela, which would make this decision impractical in the face of supply problems. immediate.

Crippling Russia’s military economy by attacking its oil and gas revenues without causing significant damage to the global economy may prove too big a task for the United States to accomplish – taking it down a road littered with nasty deals with unsavory diets.

Whichever way Washington chooses to respond to the energy shortage, one thing is certain: Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has resulted in the biggest geopolitical upheaval in decades, fundamentally redrawing the global energy map.

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Spain Russian Ukraine War | Nation & World https://faaeeantrapologia.com/spain-russian-ukraine-war-nation-world/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 01:19:02 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/spain-russian-ukraine-war-nation-world/ The country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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“Nothing matters to these Republicans but power – power and wickedness” https://faaeeantrapologia.com/nothing-matters-to-these-republicans-but-power-power-and-wickedness/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 13:26:11 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/nothing-matters-to-these-republicans-but-power-power-and-wickedness/ Cruelty is the point. Adam Serger2018 atlantic trial on donald trump describes the first year and a half of his administration as a “whirlwind of cruelty», an endless storm of insults, pettiness and intimidation. He could have written on Ron DeSantis and the Republican “leadership” of Florida. The 2022 Session, an orgy of wickedness, bad […]]]>

Cruelty is the point.

Adam Serger2018 atlantic trial on donald trump describes the first year and a half of his administration as a “whirlwind of cruelty», an endless storm of insults, pettiness and intimidation.

He could have written on Ron DeSantis and the Republican “leadership” of Florida.

The 2022 Session, an orgy of wickedness, bad faith and lies, is finally over. And what did your elected officials do, you ask?

Nothing to help the thousands of Floridians evicted and unable to find affordable housing.

Nothing to fight against the toxic algae that pollute our waters.

Nothing to help the nearly 23,000 people with intellectual or developmental disabilities still on a waiting list to get state-funded Medicaid home care assistance.

There’s No Guarantee We Won’t See Another Condo Collapse Like Surfside: The Bill To Mandate Serious Inspections And Necessary Repairs deceased.

Nothing to move Florida toward sustainable energy sources. In fact, they approved a giveaway to Florida Power & Light – whose lobbyists basically drafted the bill – by punish consumers that use solar panels.

This state has a lot of problems. But the Governor and Legislature are only interested in making scared angry white people feel good about being scared angry white people.

They bet their constituents don’t notice or care about the contempt they have for the environment, the elderly and the poor, and the particular hatred they have for public schools.

Ron DeSantis just named a women to the state Board of Education who loves the Proud Boys, supports Q-Anon and calls the Jan. 6 uprising a “peaceful protest.”

He was hardly going to choose someone rational.

Are you worried that your child will learn that despite our admirable Constitution and our inspiring Declaration of Independence, the majority of the Founders of the United States had no problem with slavery? Worried your student will come home for summer vacation with a copy of “The 1619 Project?”

Fear not: the Legislative Assembly is cracking down on educators at all levels who dare to speak the truth about the genocide of the continent’s indigenous peoples, the brutality of the plantations, the laws restricting the freedom of Asians and Native Americans, the crippling injustices of Jim Crow, and any suggestion that the nation continues to struggle with the inequities of our criminal justice system, our police, and our financial institutions.

According to his Republican sponsors, HB 7 just stop “indoctrination”, because teachers are sinister subversives who “can force their thoughts on students when they don’t know how a student can interpret the ideas of certain things.”

These same teachers perhaps say “gay” a little too often. Ron DeSantis took to protesting the “transgender injection” into our youth, which obviously can be accomplished simply by acknowledging that Trey has two dads or Heather has two moms.

Danny Burgess of Pasco County felt that children should be able to hold on to their “innocence” – and their parents’ ossified understanding of gender roles – so that a “little girl” can aspire to be a fairy tale princess. fairies and that a “little boy” can imagine being Captain America.

Someone should tell Senator Burgess: there is now a homosexual Captain America.

Sen. Ileana Garcia of Miami exhibited his mind-boggling ignorance by insisting that “gay is not a permanent thing, LGBT is not a permanent thing.”

Denis BaxleySenate companion bill sponsor SB 1834 (which is also approximately the year he last formed a coherent thought) the quiet part said aloud, “Why is everyone now ready to come out when you’re at school?”

He went on to explain that a lot of kids will want to be gay or transgender or something like that because “all of a sudden, overnight, they’ve become famous.”

Florida Republicans are now happy to say the quiet part out loud because they no longer care about moderates, socially tolerant people, or people who believe in basic human decency. These people are not their constituents. Their constituents applaud the racism, homophobia and misogyny on full display in the 2022 session.

Women will no longer be allowed to terminate a pregnancy after 15 weeks. No exceptions for rape, incest or trafficking.

Democratic senator. Janet Cruz of Tampa said the new law will “absolutely result in women seeking unsafe abortions and dying as a result.”

republican senator Kelli Stargel ignored this argument. Adult women be damned; it’s about “protecting these babies”.

Other babies, now: Those who are already born, those who come from other countries and who may have brown skin, they don’t really matter. They might even be a threat to the American Way of Life.

To that end, Florida will now prohibit state agencies and local governments from doing business with airlines, bus companies, and anyone else carrying “unauthorized strangersin Florida unless said “unauthorized aliens” are on their way to jail or deportation.

Never mind that many child asylum seekers come to Florida to stay with relatives. Senator Stargel clearly doesn’t care about protecting these babies.

It doesn’t matter that the federal government, not Ron DeSantis or the Florida legislature, sets immigration policy.

Never mind that there is no mechanism to determine exactly who is an “unauthorized alien”. What are Florida law enforcement going to do, sit at the airport or the bus station to guess who’s undocumented? Gather someone who speaks Spanish? Arrest anyone who looks “different?”

Only a few years ago, Republicans tried to hide how much they hate people who don’t look like them. Now they are loud and proud and think they can suppress and delegitimize enough votes to win this year’s election.

They made sure it will be more difficult to vote first, especially if you’re using an absentee ballot.

The governor has gotten his election crime cops (though fewer than he originally requested), who will get millions to fight voter fraud — which basically doesn’t exist, at least. unless you count the four Trumpers in The Villages arrested for voting more than once and the miscreants in South Florida who changed voter registrations from Democrat to Republican.

This absurd law is not about electoral integrity. It’s about cracking down on voting by mail and drop boxes — used in record numbers by Democrats in 2020 — and shelling out the Trumper “Stop the Steal” base.

Nothing matters to these Republicans but power – power and wickedness. They represent nothing more than beating the other side, “owning the libs” and watching their “enemies” suffer.

As Adam Serwer reminds us, cruelty “makes them feel good, makes them proud, makes them happy, makes them feel united.”

___

Diana Robert report through Florida Phoenix.

Florida Phoenix is part of States Newsroom, a network of news outlets supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Florida Phoenix maintains editorial independence. Contact the editor Diane Rado for questions: [email protected] Follow Florida Phoenix on Facebook and Twitter.


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China urges US not to undermine Beijing’s legitimate rights in relations with Russia https://faaeeantrapologia.com/china-urges-us-not-to-undermine-beijings-legitimate-rights-in-relations-with-russia/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 09:26:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/china-urges-us-not-to-undermine-beijings-legitimate-rights-in-relations-with-russia/ On Tuesday, China urged the United States not to affect Beijing’s legitimate rights and interests when dealing with Russia over the Ukraine crisis. As US-China relations continue to sour with varying accounts of the Russian-Ukrainian war, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi was asked if Beijing is concerned about US sanctions. In response to this, he […]]]>

On Tuesday, China urged the United States not to affect Beijing’s legitimate rights and interests when dealing with Russia over the Ukraine crisis. As US-China relations continue to sour with varying accounts of the Russian-Ukrainian war, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi was asked if Beijing is concerned about US sanctions. In response to this, he said the sanctions will hurt all parties in the context of a pandemic-stricken global economy.

In one of the most explicit remarks about the sanctions threatened by the United States, Wang, in a phone call with his Spanish counterpart Jose Manuel Albares, said on Monday that “China is not a party to the crisis. and also does not want the sanctions to affect China,” adding, “China has the right to safeguard its legitimate rights and interests.”

The latest development comes against the backdrop of the United States warning China, or any other country, of sanctions against aiding Russia in its invasion of Ukraine. The Russian-Ukrainian war has now entered its 20th day and reports have emerged that Russia has asked China for humanitarian and military aid, including “ready-to-eat” meals for Russian soldiers. While China has denied sending aid to Russia, the United States has warned countries against siding with Russia.

US and China meet in Rome amid Russian-Ukrainian crisis

Amid the escalating crisis in Europe after Russia launched its invasion of Ukraine on February 24, US and Chinese officials met for a key high-level meeting in Rome on March 14. The meeting between White House National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan and China’s top diplomat, Communist Party Politburo member Yang Jiechi, continued for about seven hours during which they discussed a series of global issues, including Ukraine. It is noteworthy that US officials had begun to reveal Russia’s offer for Beijing’s military and economic assistance.

Sullivan said on CBS’ “Face the Nation” on Sunday, “there is an escalation of rhetoric from the Russian side trying to accuse the Ukrainians and the United States of potentially using chemical and biological weapons.”

“It is an indicator that in fact the Russians are preparing to do this and trying to blame it on someone else. And no one should fall into the trap,” he also said.

Notably, among the aid Russia has requested from China, CNN sources say, also included packaged non-perishable military food kits, known in the United States as “ready-to-eat meals.” According to the report, the request underscored fundamental logistical challenges that analysts and military officials say have hampered Russian progress in Ukraine — and raises questions about the fundamental readiness of the Russian military.

Image: AP

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From the Editor | Amandala Diary https://faaeeantrapologia.com/from-the-editor-amandala-diary/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 06:10:19 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/from-the-editor-amandala-diary/ When the COVID-19 virus broke out in March 2020, almost two years ago, I remember thinking to myself that the only way our roots could survive this disaster was if there was a transfer of wealth from Belize’s super rich to the poor. This does not happen. In fact, the super rich grabbed more. Over […]]]>

When the COVID-19 virus broke out in March 2020, almost two years ago, I remember thinking to myself that the only way our roots could survive this disaster was if there was a transfer of wealth from Belize’s super rich to the poor. This does not happen. In fact, the super rich grabbed more.

Over time, I asked my eldest son, Mose, how our people survived. I knew things had been tough even before the coronavirus, so the virus was, as they say, a case of bad for worse. Mose said it was the Belizean diaspora in the United States that made survival in the home country possible. In the absence of any other explanation, I accepted his analysis.

When we watch our destitute and mentally retarded stagger so pitifully through the streets of the old capital, those of us who know the story feel a dagger in our chests. They are our people, and there was a time, for centuries in fact, that our people, our enslaved people, were the backbone of this land. Our centuries-enslaved people constituted the vast majority of the population of this British colony, called British Honduras by the colonial masters of London.

All Guatemalan children learn in school that the land of Belize was stolen from Guatemala by the British and that we Belizeans of color who live here were British property. It’s a whole story in itself, which will culminate in a judgment of the International Court of Justice (ICJ).

I have told you before that we Belizeans were luckier than other British subjects in this region of the Caribbean, because we had a land bridge through Mexico to the United States of America, the wealthiest economy of the world. British Honduras was the only British possession in Spanish-speaking Central America. So when US immigration officials at the US-Mexico border heard black people speaking English, they assumed those people were black Americans, not “wetbacks”.

It was World War II that opened the eyes of the working class of Bosnia and Herzegovina to the wealth and generosity of America, compared to the suffering imposed on us by British “geechs”. During World War II (1939-1945), Belizean workers were hired to work in the Canal Zone in Panama, where the Americans ran things. Belizeans began to want to travel to the United States.

The larger context of this situation had to do with the Monroe Doctrine, a declaration by the United States government in 1823 that they would no longer tolerate interference in the Western Hemisphere by any European power, a designation that would include the Great Britain, which was in possession of British Honduras in 1823. (The United States of America had declared independence from Britain in 1776.)

But there was a special relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom in the 19th century (white supremacy), so in 1859 the United States “sponsored” an agreement whereby Guatemala joined the borders international to define The Jewel – 8,867 square miles – as British. territory.

A few decades later, the commercial/industrial and military classes in power in Guatemala began to complain about the 1859 treaty, but in 1919 there was a massive uprising of black people in Belize (the so-called “Black British ), which was essentially rejecting British colonial rule. Yet Guatemala, the hostile 1,000-pound gorilla, remained on Belize’s western and southern borders, and it was the British who had to send a warship here in 1948 to protect Belizeans, the majority of whom were black.

In 1950, however, because the British devalued the Belizean dollar, Belizeans began campaigning for self-rule and independence. This original Belizean push for autonomy was supported between 1951 and 1954 by a Guatemalan government led by Jacobo Arbenz.

But Arbenz was too nationalistic for the Americans, so Washington engineered his overthrow and began installing CIA puppets like Carlos Castillo Armas and Miguel Ydigoras Fuentes to run Guatemala. The result was a terrible civil war in Guatemala, which began in 1960 and lasted until 1996.

During this period of bloody violence in the republic, Belize was completely peaceful and was granted autonomy in 1964. The British were now beginning to transfer British Honduras to the hegemony of the Americans who, following Hurricane Hattie in 1961 , began to absorb Belize. black population in the Union.

Today, Belize is a minority black population. The transition from black majority to black minority was peaceful because we Belizeans wanted to move north.

So now this is where Belize is today, where Washington has decided we are. The one thing that really sets us apart from the two Central American republics around us – Guatemala and Honduras – is that English is the official language of Belize. When that changes, it becomes a whole new ballgame. Believe me.

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MiradasDoc Film Festival Prize Ukraine, Cuba, Palestine Crises Docs https://faaeeantrapologia.com/miradasdoc-film-festival-prize-ukraine-cuba-palestine-crises-docs/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 15:51:00 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/miradasdoc-film-festival-prize-ukraine-cuba-palestine-crises-docs/ Documentaries on the conflict in Ukraine, the situation of Cuban migrants and the Palestinian refugee crisis were among the big winners of MiradasDoc, Spain’s most important documentary film festival, which closed its 15th edition on March 12. Based in Tenerife, in the Canary Islands, the festival was an in-person event from March 4-12, while its […]]]>

Documentaries on the conflict in Ukraine, the situation of Cuban migrants and the Palestinian refugee crisis were among the big winners of MiradasDoc, Spain’s most important documentary film festival, which closed its 15th edition on March 12.

Based in Tenerife, in the Canary Islands, the festival was an in-person event from March 4-12, while its market (March 8-11) remained virtual for the second consecutive year.

The prize for best international documentary went to “Option Zero” (“La Opcion Cero”) by Cuban filmmaker Marcel Beltran while the prize for best first feature was extended to “Trenches” by French journalist Loup Bureau who covered the Arab Spring in Egypt, the Syrian War and the Russian-Ukrainian conflict in the Donbass region.

“Trenches” follows the fearless young men and women who fight against Russian-backed separatists in Ukraine’s Donbass region. In a video message sent to the festival, Bureau said: “The current situation in Ukraine is still catastrophic and I have tried to reach my friends all over the country but it is complicated because some have left to fight and others are already dead; everyone I know in this country fight or flee.

Bureau, which has covered Ukraine for the past eight years, said the award was the only good news it had received in the past two weeks. Expressing their fears that the conflict could last for months, a visibly moved Bureau commented: “’Trenches’ sort of explains how we got into this situation. Ukrainians pay a very high price for being a free and independent nation.

“I think that we Europeans must do everything we can to help them and not look the other way,” he said, stressing that what is happening in Ukraine has a vital impact on the future of the EU. Europe.

The Cuban, Brazilian and Colombian co-production “Option Zero” revolves around Cuban migrants who have crossed Central America to reach the United States and find themselves in limbo in a refugee camp in Panama. Beltran had access to their cell phone videos that captured over 100 hours of their journey through the Colombian jungles. These videos are punctuated with footage of Beltran on the camp, contrasting their harrowing journey and the insecurities of their life at the camp, where they could easily be deported to Cuba.

Expressing his gratitude to the festival and the jury in a video message, Beltran dedicated his prize to Cuban migrants “who continue their transit, their lives and their experiences” and thanked them “for their friendship which made this documentary possible”.

Zero option
Courtesy of MiradasDoc

“Little Palestine, Diary of a Siege”, by Abdallah Al-Khatib, which won a special mention in the category best first feature film, delves into another refugee crisis. This focuses on Yarmouk, the largest Palestinian refugee camp in the world from 1957 to 2018, located in the Yarmouk district of Damascus, Syria. When the Syrian revolution broke out, Bashar Al-Assad’s regime suspected that the camp was a refuge for the resistance and besieged it from 2013, depriving it of food, medicine and electricity. Al-Khatib was born in Yarmouk and lived there until his expulsion by Daesh in 2015.

The Best Short Film award went to Vietnamese-Czech director Diana Cam Van Nguyen’s “Love, Dad,” which delves into the relationship between a child and a parent. The court participated in the Anidoc Sur Lab in 2020.

Meanwhile, the MiradasDoc marketplace saw record attendance in its second virtual race, which helped attract more participants from around the world.

A variety of prizes were distributed among selected international projects in development, led by Uganda’s “The Woman who Poked the Leopard” by Patience Nitumwesiga, which focuses on medical anthropologist, gay rights activist and feminist Stella Nyanzi who, despite threats to his life, combines radical discourtesy and traditional resistance tactics to deal with oppression.

Winners of the XV MiradasDoc

PRIZE FOR BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM

“Zero Option” (Marcel Beltran, Cuba, Brazil, Colombia)

BEST FIRST FILM

“Trench”, (Loup Bureau, France)

BEST FIRST FILM, SPECIAL MENTION

“Little Palestine, diary of a siege” (Abdallah Al-Khatib, Lebanon, France, Qatar)

BEST SHORT FILM

“I Love You, Dad” (Diana Cam Van Nguyen, Czech Republic)

BEST SHORT FILM, SPECIAL MENTION

“In a flow of words” (Eliane Esther Bots, Netherlands)

BEST SPANISH SHORT FILM

“Outtakes” (“Descartes”) (Concha Barquero & Alejandro Alvarado, Spain)

MIRADASDOC MARKET PRICE

MIRADASDOC DEVELOPMENT AWARD

“The Woman Who Pushed the Leopard” (Patience Nitumwesiga, Uganda, South Africa)

DOCMONTEVIDEO PRIZE

“The Vanished” (Sophie Chevalier & Omar Zeballos, Chile)

“Searching for Words” (Joel Stängle, Colombia)

DURBAN FILM MARKET PRIZE

“The camera never cries” (Elsadig Abdelgayoum & Abuzar Adam, Sudan)

PRICE DOCSMX

“Searching for Words” (Joel Stängle, Colombia)

“Un Hogar Sin Armarios” (Eduardo Cubillo Blasco, Canary Islands, Spain)

PRICE DOCSSP

“Minha Carne Sabe” (Zica Pires & Simone Giovine, Brazil)

AFROLATAM PRIZE

“Afromilonga” (Alejandro Espolsino, María Eugenia Lombardi, Mawete Paciencia & Leticia Rodríguez Taboada, Argentina, Uruguay, Angola, Kenya)

SUBBABEL PRIZE

“La Fábula de la Tortuga y la Flor” (Caroline Campo Lupo, Uruguay)

SAPFICCALI AWARD

“Carmela y los Caminantes” (Esteban Coloma & Luis Herrera R, Ecuador)

“Carabali” (Medhin Tewolde Serrano, Mexico)

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Russia-Ukraine war: the discredit of the European right aligned with Putin https://faaeeantrapologia.com/russia-ukraine-war-the-discredit-of-the-european-right-aligned-with-putin/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 18:20:52 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/russia-ukraine-war-the-discredit-of-the-european-right-aligned-with-putin/ The war in Ukraine has challenged the support network Vladimir Putin has forged in Europe with far-right politicians for years. This is not surprising because Putin considers himself “conservative”, and partly critical of the Soviet era he lived in the last years of the USSR as a young officer of the KGB, the legendary secret […]]]>

The war in Ukraine has challenged the support network Vladimir Putin has forged in Europe with far-right politicians for years.

This is not surprising because Putin considers himself “conservative”, and partly critical of the Soviet era he lived in the last years of the USSR as a young officer of the KGB, the legendary secret service.

Moreover, from a declared atheist, he has already converted to power to the Orthodox Christian religion during a ceremony presided over by the Patriarch of All Russia, Kirill. His dream is to revive the Russian Empire.

The most important figure on the list is Italian Matteo Salvini, a member of the Rome government and leader of the right-wing League, who in 2018 won 34.6% in the European Parliament elections held in Italy .

From that peak, it has since fallen to the current 18%. Salvini was the right-wing candidate in next year’s Italian general election.

Salvini, in the crosshairs

The slippage he suffered following Putin’s warlike adventure hurt him so much that his own party discreetly asked him not to move and to speak as little as possible.


Salvini, uneasy, when they take out a T-shirt with Putin’s face. (AP)

Salvini was a member of the European Parliament and at the Strasbourg Palace he spoke openly in favor of Putin on several occasions. Once on television, he declared: “I am exchanging a Mattarella for Putin”, a boast directed against the President of the Republic, Sergio Mattarella, today the most respected and beloved figure of Italians.

Salvini’s pro-Putin proclamations abound. The aggression against Ukraine forced him to affirm that he was against the war without criticizing the Russian president and to go to the border with Poland, where a stream of refugees arrives every day.

“I came to help women and boys,” he told reporters. His visit included a meeting with the Polish mayor of Przemys, Woichec Bakum, who received him surrounded by journalists. A video broadcast hundreds of times in Italy showed that when Salvini arrived, the mayor unsheathed a white T-shirt bearing the image of Putin, who realized he had fallen into a trap .

It was the “maglietta” that he knew how to distribute to thousands of people and with which he walked around carrying it in 2017 in Moscow’s Red Square. The mayor did not invite him and Salvini withdrew amid cries of repudiation.

In France, the Putin affair fell like a bomb on the far right, which is divided in the first round of the presidential elections scheduled for April.

Marine Le Pen’s admiration for Putin

National Rally candidate Marine Le Pen, who shares a group with Salvini in the European Parliament, told Russian newspaper Kommersant in 2011 that she admired Putin.

Now he had to condemn the war in Ukraine. On February 24, when the invasion began, Le Pen called for the withdrawal of troops, saying the military operation “breaks the balance of peace in Europe”.

Marine Le Pen, loyal ally of Putin.  (AFP)

Marine Le Pen, loyal ally of Putin. (AFP)

Taking some distance does not make us forget that in 2017 Marine Le Pen was received by Putin when she was the face-to-face candidate of the far-right National Front, founded by her father.

Le Pen now denies his closeness to Putin. “I was one of the few politicians who always sought to maintain an equidistance between the United States and Russia. The newspaper “Liberation” reported that the Lepenists had to destroy a million electoral leaflets which depicted Le Pen with Putin.

Zemmour also bowed to Putin

Eric Zemmour, the other far-right candidate in the French presidential elections – where President Emmanuel Macron is increasingly favored – challenges Le Pen but last December predicted that Russia would never invade Ukraine, denouncing the “American propaganda”. This week he should have condemned the invasion in an act.

The pearl that the French press has discovered is that in 2018, Zemmour declared: “I feel like a French Poutine”. He comes out in favor of an alliance with Russia, which “would be the most reliable ally”.

Italian counter-terrorism services have detected that since 2014, when the war in Ukraine’s Donbass region began, more than sixty extremists have been fighting alongside small far-left groups in Italy for Russian claims. There are also right-wing groups that have taken up arms in support of Ukrainians.

The two main Italian neo-fascist groups are divided. Forza Nuova blames the United States and NATO, the Western alliance, for the conflict.

Pound House, named after the great American poet Ezra Pound, with fascist sympathies, is openly pro-Ukrainian “in defense of foreign imperialism”.

In Belgium, the extreme right of the Nation is on the side of Russia while the ultra-fascists of Bruges have taken the side of Ukraine. In Croatia, extremist groups of organized supporters have sided with Putin, while the ultra-nationalist far-right has sponsored enlistment in the neo-Nazi Ukrainian Azov Battalion, which is fighting in Mariupol.

In France, the Les Nationalistes party, led by Yvan Benedetti, justifies President Putin, while Bordeaux Nationaliste defends Ukraine.

The German Neo-Nazi Right

In Germany, the neo-Nazi alternative right defends Ukrainian President Zelensky with “a Europe that must free itself from Russian and American power”.

In Spain, the Democracia Nacional is mobilizing in favor of Ukraine, while another far-right movement, La Phalange, wonders if Putin is the only culprit.

In the Netherlands, far-right leader Geert Wilders and his Freedom Party vindicated Putin. Wilders himself visited the Russian Duma (Parliament) showing Russian and Dutch benderites.

In 2017, he repeated that “Putin is not an enemy” and denounced “hysterical Russophobia”. Russia “is on our side”. Now his enthusiasm has cooled.

Another very important character is missing. The ultra-conservative Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán, who in the European Union leads the four sovereignist countries, including Poland. A month ago, he flew to Moscow to meet Putin, an unwelcome gesture in the European Union.

When the Russians began the invasion on February 24, Orbán quickly changed his position: he endorsed European Union sanctions, backed Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, and traveled to Hungary’s border with Ukraine to welcome the fugitives. “We’ll get everyone in,” he promised.

A big change because Orbán was the sworn enemy of immigrants from Asia and Africa.

TOPICS THAT APPEAR IN THIS NOTE

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Meet Sister Lucía Caram, the nun who traveled 4,000 miles in one weekend to save Ukrainian refugees https://faaeeantrapologia.com/meet-sister-lucia-caram-the-nun-who-traveled-4000-miles-in-one-weekend-to-save-ukrainian-refugees/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 22:02:18 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/meet-sister-lucia-caram-the-nun-who-traveled-4000-miles-in-one-weekend-to-save-ukrainian-refugees/ Russian President Vladimir Putin’s war against Ukraine has not only caused the deaths of hundreds of civilians, including many children, and the terrible destruction of towns and villages; it has also involved in different ways more than 30 European countries, the United States, Canada, Japan, South Korea, Israel, Turkey, China (to some extent) and other […]]]>

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s war against Ukraine has not only caused the deaths of hundreds of civilians, including many children, and the terrible destruction of towns and villages; it has also involved in different ways more than 30 European countries, the United States, Canada, Japan, South Korea, Israel, Turkey, China (to some extent) and other states.

The war has already caused Europe’s biggest humanitarian crisis since World War II, forcing more than two million people to seek refuge in other countries. But it has also caused a tidal wave of solidarity across the continent, unprecedented since 1945.

An extraordinary example of this solidarity was the incredible effort made last weekend by Lucía Caram, OP, 55 years old. Saint Ignatius of Loyola wrote the famous spiritual exercises— to Romania’s northern border with Ukraine. She went to offer concrete help to the refugees arriving from the attacked country.

Sister Lucía left Manresa at 6 a.m. on March 4 and arrived in Romania the following evening. She immediately went to a refugee camp in the north of the country. The next day, the morning of March 6, she began the journey back to Spain, bringing with her six refugees: three women and three teenagers who had nowhere to go.

Sister Lucia spoke with America via Zoom hours after he returned safely to his convent in Manresa, having traveled 3,725 miles in four days. It’s his story.

“I spent restless nights wondering how I could help”

Sister Lucía is a dynamic and contemplative Dominican living in a community that is renewing itself. Her work is very much in the spirit of Pope Francis, who knows her. She has extraordinary organizational skills and is well known in Spain for her aid to refugees and her work to combat child poverty. She is a fan of the Barcelona football team and is a friend of footballer Lionel Messi, who has helped her and many others to support his extensive charity work for young people, families in need and people in need. immigrants.

The Dominican community of Sister Lucía welcomes Ukrainian refugees. (Photo courtesy of Lucia Caram)

For four years, Sister Lucía and her community have assisted three Ukrainian families and, more recently, they have taken care of a mother and a child who came from Ukraine. Thanks to these experiences, Sr. Lucía was already well informed about the situation before the start of the war.

The day after Russia invaded Ukraine on February 25, Sister Lucía held a prayer service for peace in the large chapel of her convent. She had expected a handful of people to attend, but there were so many that they couldn’t all fit into the church. “The desire for peace was palpable,” she said.

On Saturday, February 26, she joined Ukrainian families she knew at a peace demonstration in Manresa.

“We can’t just look the other way because peace depends on everyone,” she said. “We are all under threat and Ukrainians are our brothers and sisters. Sister Lucía said she was “deeply impressed” by the large crowds who came to protest against the war. He revealed that “people want peace, not war,” she said.

“People want peace, not war,” said Sister Lucía.

After the rally, she said Inna, a young Ukrainian woman living in Manresa who the sisters are helping, said she was deeply worried about her parents who lived in Kyiv but hoped to flee to northern Romania in the next few days. days ; one of his parents suffers from a serious health problem. Inna asked Sister Lucía if she could get them to safety in Spain.

“I spent restless nights wondering how I could help,” Sister Lucía said, “until Wednesday, March 1, when Luis, one of the volunteers helping with the work of our foundation, half-said jokingly: “Lucía, why don’t we just go to Romania and bring them back?’”

She thought about his suggestion, prayed and decided to go to Romania to bring back Inna’s parents. Early in the morning of Friday, March 4, she began the long journey by minibus, accompanied by Luis, who took turns driving with her.

“A River of Refugees”

When they arrived in Romania on the evening of March 5, Sr. Lucía received a message from the young Ukrainian woman saying that her parents could not leave Kiev because of the shelling in the area. But, she said, she had a friend with a child who had managed to flee the city and was now entering Sighet, a town in northern Romania. Inna sent Sister Lucía pictures of the woman and child and asked if she could bring them instead.

Sister Lucía went to Sighet to find the friend and her child. She searched for them in the refugee camp in the town of Satu Mare, where people were given food, clothes and a place to rest after fleeing the terror of Russian bombs. At the camp, she met Marian, a Romanian who had worked in Spain for 18 years as a carpenter but was now serving as a volunteer, helping refugees. Marian helped Sister Lucía search for the woman and her son among the thousands of refugees in the camp.

In Satu Mare, “I was deeply moved watching a stream of buses bringing Ukrainian refugees, and a river of refugees, arrive on foot, after traveling many, many miles,” she said. “They came with little or nothing, clutching their few belongings. They were exhausted. They all looked scared; they were like sheep.

“I will never forget seeing so many men, some young and alone, walking towards the Ukrainian border, carrying a backpack or a bag, with tears in their eyes,” she said. “They were coming back to fight for their homeland.”

At the camp, she says, “we saw the best of human nature,” but she also learned that this war has brought out a darker side: at some entry points on Romania’s borders with Ukraine and Hungary, what she described as “mafias” demanded money from refugees to be allowed to enter Romania and Hungary.

At the start of the war, some 75,000 foreign nationals were studying in educational institutions across Ukraine, but their status was disrupted during the war. At the Satu Mare camp, Sister Lucía said she saw a group of 30 medical students from Turkmenistan, as well as people from India and Africa who had residence permits for Ukraine but had no documents. allowing them to enter the European Union beyond Romania. . Their right to asylum not being recognized, they found themselves stranded. “They were the poorest of the poor! she says.

Sr. Lucía also remarked that Ukrainians are “very religious people” and that many religious groups, including Pentecostals and Orthodox, wanted to be close to refugees at this tragic time in their lives.

But “I will never forget seeing so many men, some young and alone, walking towards the Ukrainian border, carrying a backpack or a bag, with tears in their eyes,” she said. “They were coming back to fight for their homeland.”

Welcome the unknown

As Sister Lucía moved around the camp, Inna’s friend Olena Rozhova spotted the nun. She recognized Sister Lucía from a photo Inna had sent her. Mrs. Rozhova ran to Sister Lucía and said, “I love Jesus very much. Sister Lucía was overwhelmed with emotion; she kissed Olena and then kissed Nikita, her 12-year-old son. “It was a great moment,” she recalls.

Soon after, Sister Lucía noticed another woman, Irina Antonenko, 39, with two teenage children, Illia, 13, and Alexandra, 14. Ms Antonenko had said goodbye to her husband in Kiev, where he was staying to fight. She didn’t know anyone in the camp and had nowhere to go, so Sister Lucía invited her and her children to join the group back in Spain, and Mrs. Antonenko happily accepted. Then Sister Lucía noticed another woman, Alessa, 39, who was visibly sad; she had left her mother in Kiev. She too looked lost, so Sister Lucía invited her to come with her as well.

Sr. Lucia and the refugees stop for a snack on their journey
Sister Lucía and some refugees stop for a snack on their journey to Spain. (Photo courtesy of Lucia Caram)

Sister Lucía now had a group of six refugees. She invited them to board the minibus, and they left for the Hungarian border in the early morning of Sunday, March 6. None of the three women knew each other; they were total strangers to each other and had met for the first time in this tragic situation.

They set out on the 2,000+ mile journey to Manresa but soon ran into trouble at the Hungarian border after being stuck in traffic for more than four hours. Ms. Antonenko did not have a biometric passport for herself or the children; they only had a family identity card issued by the Ukrainian authorities. Sister Lucía tried to convince the Hungarian border authorities to let Ms Antonenko and her family pass. Her patience was tested, she said, but being a nun helped, and she eventually made it. “It was the hardest experience I had on this trip,” she said.

En route to Spain, “the six refugees slept the whole way, except when we stopped to eat or go to the toilet,” she said. “They came with nothing, no money, and some only had the clothes they were wearing.”

The refugees were warmly welcomed upon their arrival at the convent. The sisters of the community of Sister Lucía awaited them with many young people, older volunteers and members of the press. News of Sister Lucía’s bold enterprise had traveled quickly.

Sr. Lucía’s next step is to work for the integration of the refugees, first teaching them Spanish and then helping them find a home. She said that for the first week the refugees will stay at the convent, and after that she will relocate them to apartments in and around Manresa. News of her initiative sparked an outpouring of solidarity: more than 500 apartments were offered to refugees, along with all sorts of other aid, she said.

Sr. Lucía works with 17 couples of lay volunteers, who will do the necessary bureaucratic work to ensure that the refugees obtain residence permits and social security cards. The European Union has passed legislation guaranteeing Ukrainian refugees residence permits for up to two years, with social benefits.

Sister Lucía Caram, however, does not consider this a moment of rest. She has now partnered with NGOs and a local business. With their help, next Saturday she plans to rent a plane and fly from Spain to Poland to bring another 200 Ukrainian refugees back to Manresa.

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Despite Notorious Obstacles, IT Talent Seekers See Brazil as a New Frontier https://faaeeantrapologia.com/despite-notorious-obstacles-it-talent-seekers-see-brazil-as-a-new-frontier/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 17:30:33 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/despite-notorious-obstacles-it-talent-seekers-see-brazil-as-a-new-frontier/ Tech recruiters in Brazil are struggling. The talent market is a limitless competition for salaries, benefits and work-from-home offers. The country’s vast internal market pits its domestic rivals against each other, while Portuguese companies circle overhead, looking for top talent willing to outsource their workforce. But more and more nearshore players, traditionally uninterested in engaging […]]]>

Tech recruiters in Brazil are struggling. The talent market is a limitless competition for salaries, benefits and work-from-home offers. The country’s vast internal market pits its domestic rivals against each other, while Portuguese companies circle overhead, looking for top talent willing to outsource their workforce.

But more and more nearshore players, traditionally uninterested in engaging in the beauraratic and tax-heavy process of incorporating or hiring directly in the country, are also joining the fight, according to stakeholders.

Barriers that once seemed to take too long to mount with other markets more favorable to abundant foreign investment in Latin America and no longer appearing so great.

Isabela Lorenzi Tori, Technical Recruiter at Visionaire

Isabela Lorenzi Tori, Technology Recruiter at Visionary, an international software development company based in Curitiba, is witnessing firsthand the entry of Nearshore players. While Portuguese companies remain the strongest competition, American companies are also in force.

“Recruiters can lose up to 50% of our candidates to Portuguese companies. For engineers who speak English, we lose one out of three or four,” Tori said.

A large local market

Brazil’s economic potential requires little explanation. The country’s population of 212 million, its vast and diverse geography and its GDP (PPP) of US$3.2 trillion – by far the highest in Latin America – set the scene.

But the strength of Brazil’s domestic market was such, along with the difficulties for foreigners to set foot in the country, that until recently, domestic companies and domestic talent had much less reason to push for Nearshore development.

The change happened slowly. As previously reported by Nearshore Americas, cities like Curitiba, the eighth largest metropolis in Brazil with a reasonable size of 2 million inhabitants, have been trying to position themselves as regional technological hubs for some years. A two-year recession in 2015 turned the heads of some tech leaders toward the export market for the first time. In 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic caused the country’s worst GDP drop in decades. Interest in working beyond Brazilian borders has increased.

Bernardo Carvalho Wertheim, CEO of The Bridge Social

With the talent shortage looming, the slow change has taken on a sense of urgency. Bernardo Carvalho Wertheim, CEO and Director of Happiness at The social bridgea global recruitment company and hailing from Brazil, has seen a huge jump in international interest in talent in its home country, as well as an increase in the number of people looking for jobs outside .

“It’s exploding,” he said.

On its database alone, The Bridge Social has approximately 120,000 Brazilian technology, data and design professionals. The company hires and outsources some 200 Brazilian profiles per month for clients across Latin America and the United States. The tech talent pool is huge and well-trained, Carvalho Wertheim points out.

“Brazil is an absolute gold mine in terms of talent,” he said.

The middle classes tend to dominate the tech industry, and English instruction is the norm in private schools. Brazil’s demographic history means that people can also speak Italian, Spanish or German, and some even hold passports for these countries. Global companies like IBM, SAP and Microsoft have used the country as their mainstay in the region for years.

Tedious tax, but useful for those who do

Barriers that have traditionally kept Nearshore away from Brazil remain, says Douglas David, COO of a Latin America-focused market entry company, Latin business center.

Douglas David, COO at Biz Latin Hub

“Put simply, Brazil is just not that easy to get into. Brazil is still one of the most bureaucratic countries to start a business in Latin America,” he said.

Taxation is a problem that international companies must solve.

“Initially, foreign investors find it difficult to understand the entire Brazilian legal system, not just its tax aspects. It is important to mention that Brazil is a federation, divided between the federal government, the states and the municipalities. Each of the 3 federative entities has the power to institute its taxes in accordance with the federal Constitution,” explained David.

Incorporating a business takes much longer in Brazil than in other Latin American cities, and there are many unique legal restrictions that must be understood by businesses venturing there. Direct hiring doesn’t seem any easier. Despite all this, companies are getting into it.

“The pool of English-speaking talent is already drying up,” David said. “Six months ago, we needed a few weeks to find talent. Now it takes us months. Salaries are a big part of that. »

Rising wages

In Curibita in 2020, the average salary for a software engineer was 5,681 Brazilian reals (BRL) per month. The pandemic and the interest of international customers have had the same flattening effect on wages as elsewhere: although in 2020 wages in Sao Paulo or Rio de Janeiro would probably have been much higher, the difference between wages across the country are shrinking.

In 2020, the exchange rate was 5.1942 BRL for each USD. Today it is 5.0592 BRL for USD. However, wages are rising.

A senior React Native engineer will likely earn around BRL10,000 to BRL15,000 per month (approximately $1,980 to $2,970), while a mid-level engineer will earn around BRL10,000 to BRL12,000 ($1,584 to $1 $980). Project managers can earn between BRL 15,000 and BRL 20,000 ($2,970 to $3,960), estimates Lorenzi Tori.

And there’s a big difference for tech professionals working for global companies versus local competitors.

“Entry-level professionals working for international companies earn the equivalent of mid-level salaries in the domestic market. Middle levels earn higher salaries,” said Lorenzi Tori. “The dollar makes a big difference.”

No change for the Brazilian Nearshore BPO

The same increase in activity cannot be said for the Brazilian BPO industry. Never having been part of the Nearshore strategy but more focused on Portugal and to a lesser extent Spain, BPOs in Brazil remain on the sidelines.

Marc Hillary

Fluency in English is not a given in all sectors of society and salaries remain relatively high compared to other countries.

CX and technology analyst and writer Mark Hillary compares Brazil to China: “very focused on the big local market.”

“Brazil is not a low cost environment,” he said. “That may change for freelancers and on-demand, but traditional outsourcing from the US doesn’t seem that important.”

Brazil: part of the coastal puzzle

An industry that has long viewed Brazil as something of an outcast is now making its voice heard in the country. Whether this shift was born out of necessity or the realization that Brazil’s tech offering is too good to pass, Carvalho Wertheim has some advice for Nearshore players.

“Don’t think of Brazil in isolation, but as part of the puzzle, part of the strategy for Latin America. Yes, it’s a politically difficult market, but that’s the reality for most of the region. Brazil is more and more digitized and there is not as much red tape as before,” he said.

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Canada fines private jet chartered by Russians https://faaeeantrapologia.com/canada-fines-private-jet-chartered-by-russians/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 17:33:07 +0000 https://faaeeantrapologia.com/canada-fines-private-jet-chartered-by-russians/ While most media coverage of aviation-related sanctions has focused on the seizure of the assets of designated oligarchs, including their private jets, the actions of the UK, European Union, Canada and the United States to forbid Russian nationals from chartering private jets. A note last week, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said: “Notice to Air […]]]>

While most media coverage of aviation-related sanctions has focused on the seizure of the assets of designated oligarchs, including their private jets, the actions of the UK, European Union, Canada and the United States to forbid Russian nationals from chartering private jets.

A note last week, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said: “Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM) and regulatory orders will suspend operations of all aircraft owned, certified, operated, registered, chartered, leased or controlled by, for or for the benefit of a person who is a citizen of Russia. This includes passenger and cargo flights, as well as scheduled and charter flights, thereby closing US airspace to all Russian commercial air carriers and other Russian civil aircraft. »

According to a report in the national postCanada may have caught the first private jet charter flight attempting to circumvent sanctions.

A large cabin Dassault Falcon 900 registered in the Cayman Islands, its crew and passengers were detained in Yellowknife after landing from Geneva, Switzerland last Tuesday. The plane was jettisoned and returned to Europe on Friday.

The Russian charter customer was fined $3,000, as was the pilot of the jet. The plane’s owner, listed as Dunard Engineering Ltd., was fined $15,000.

Diane Archie, Minister of Infrastructure, told Canadian regional lawmakers: “It appears that the plane and its passengers were en route to Resolute, Nunavut, with the intention of taking part in a planned land expedition in the Arctic in a large all-terrain utility vehicle.

MORE FORBESHere’s how Russian sanctions could impact private jets

It is unclear how authorities were led to the jet or whether the actions were the result of normal customs and immigration processing. Russians are not allowed to charter jets; however, they may travel as passengers.

David Hernandez, Vedder Price partner and former FAA and DOT attorney, warns industry and consumers to act proactively to comply with sanctions. He says US officials are taking a “shoot first, ask questions later” approach.

He says the sanctions apply to holders of dual passports, so anyone who holds Russian citizenship is subject to the charter ban.

MORE FORBESThe teenager who followed Elon Musk’s plane is now following the private jets of Russian oligarchs

Last week during a webinar organized by Business Jet Investor, one participant noted: “Yesterday we had a flight with a European operator between Italy and France. Because the captain was Russian – he has lived in the Czech Republic for 10 years – the plane was seen refuse entry into France.”

Another participant expressed concern about what will be expected of industry to ensure compliance, particularly with customers who have multiple passports.

Robert Baltus, COO of the European Business Aviation Association, warned brokers and operators against allowing customers to use workarounds.

Reading the EU sanctions, he noted: “It is prohibited to participate, knowingly or intentionally, in activities the object or effect of which is to circumvent the prohibitions set out in this decision, including by acting in the place of the natural or legal person persons, entities or bodies subject to these prohibitions, or by acting for their benefit by using one of the exceptions provided for in this Decision. »

While Canadian fines may seem light, Hernandez says operators are risking their certificates and aircraft owners could have their aircraft confiscated.

So far, it is unclear what steps industry players have taken to ensure Russian nationals do not charter their jets. One executive said he expects operators to require principal passengers and brokers to certify that the customer does not hold a Russian passport or is not the principal of a Russian-controlled business.

Another operator executive said it was a hot topic. “It’s a discussion right now. I think it’s going to be a bit like Covid. There are daily developments. Once everyone understands that (Covid) was not short term, and that there were (compliance issues), you saw the industry figure out how to comply. Aviation is highly regulated. This may be one more form for customers to sign, but I think (the authorities) will say that we have a responsibility to inform customers. If a customer gives us a Spanish or American passport, and they provide an affidavit that they do not have a Russian passport, that they are not subject to sanctions and that we are doing our normal due diligence, against no-fly lists etc. hopefully this will show that we are doing our part (but) we are paying our lawyers to tell us what to do.”

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